Scott Co, Iowa USGenWeb Project

Charles W. Lau Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Lau, Sehl, Kreiter, Down.

A well developed farm of one hundred and sixty acres, owned by Charles W. Lau, forms one of the attractive features in the landscape of Lincoln township. This is the old home place of the family and it was in this township that Charles W. Lau was born, March 26, 1855, his parents being Peter N. and Maria (Sehl) Lau, who were early German settlers of Scott county. They were both born in Holstein, Germany, and were there reared and married. The father followed the occupation of farming and had charge of a large estate in his native country, where he continued to reside until after a birth of four of his children. He then brought his family to the United states, landing at New York on the 22nd of May, 1853. Two of his children, William and Fritz, had died at sea and their remains were interred in a cemetery at Brooklyn, New York. The family then continued on their westward way to Davenport, making the journey by rail to Chicago and thence by prairie schooner. They arrived in June, 1853, and Peter N. Lau purchased prairie land. He left his family for about a half year in Davenport, while he prepared the land for cultivation, built a house and otherwise placed his farm in condition for a family home. With the exception of a brief period spent in the city, he continued a resident of Lincoln township from the time of his arrival until called to his final rest. As the years passed by he prospered and at one time was an extensive landowner. Later, however, he disposed of much of the property and at the time of his demise owned only a half section. He was prominent in community affairs, serving in a number of township offices, including that of school director and trustee. His last years were spent in retirement from active business, and he died on the 5th of March, 1884, at the age of sixty-four years. His wife passed away in 1897, at the age of eighty-one years. In their family were six children, four of whom are yet living: Henry, of Lincoln township; Margaret, of Davenport; Charles W., of this review; and Elizabeth of Davenport.
Charles W. Lau has spent his entire life in Lincoln township and his early education, acquired in the district schools, was supplemented by study in Griswold College. He then returned home and assisted his father in the cultivation of the farm. In 1881 he married and took possession of the farm, while his parents retired and removed to Davenport. Here Charles W. Lau ha resided continuously sine, devoting his time and energies to the further development and improvement of his land as the years have gone by. He is diligent and persevering in all that he undertakes and his farm is one of the highly developed properties of the locality. He makes a specialty of raising alfalfa and has given much time to introducing the crop here. He also carries on general farming and keeps a number of cows, making a specialty of the production of butter. The house which he occupies was erected by his father in 1866 and is one of the old landmarks of the county. The father purchased this place when it was all wild prairie land, not a furrow having been turned nor an improvement made upon it, but as the years went by the labors of the father and son have transformed it into one of the best properties of this section of the state.
It was on the 10th of March, 1881, that Mr. Lau was married to Miss Elizabeth Kreiter, a daughter of Charles and Marie Kreiter, of Davenport township. Her parents, of German birth, came to the United States about 1866. her father died in 1906, at the age of seventy-four years, and the mother is still living. Mrs. Lau was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, and by her marriage has become the mother of six children: Alfred H., at home; Oscar M., who wedded Ethel Down and makes his home in Des Moines, Iowa; Carl S., who recently enjoyed a trip around the world and is now at home; Elmer H., who is in the Navy; Cora M., who is a high-school student; and Victor Charles.
In addition to his farming interests Mr. Lau is serving as vice president of the German Mutual Fire Insurance Company and has been active along many lines whereby the interests of the community and the county at large have been promoted. He has served as a trustee of the township and for about eleven years was school director. He is a prominent member of Grange No. 2029, of which he is master and he is also master of the Pomona Grange, and president of the Farmers Cooperative Association. He was one of the organizers of the Grange, has always taken a prominent part in its meetings and has been actively identified with the Farmers Institute work, which he helped to organize, serving on the board of directors. He is likewise identified with the German Pioneer Society of Scott county. His labors have resulted not only to his own benefit but have been of material assistance in promoting general progress

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


James B. Padgham, M. D. Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Padgham, Rager, Bell, Battey, Kniffen, Kischner.

Dr. James Padgham, who has recently taken up the practice of medicine in Donahue, Allens Grove township, was born at Inland, Cedar county, Iowa, March 30, 1883, a son of Dr. George W. and Magdalena (Rager) Padgham. The father was born near Troy, New York, in 1849, but as a mere child came to Iowa with his parents, settling in Scott county. He received his early education in the public schools, after which he attended the State University of Iowa, from which he obtained his medical degree. For a number of years he practiced in Cedar county then removing to Scott county, made his home in Dixon for ten years, after which he returned to the former county, where, in the town of Bennett, he spent the last four years of his life. His death occurred July 4, 1898. His wife was born near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in 1848 and was about fourteen years of age when her parents located in Cedar county, Iowa, where she grew to maturity. She is now living in Dixon, Scott county. Five children were born to Dr. and Mrs. George Padgham: Mary Myrtle, who died at the age of seventeen years; John T., a physician in Dayton, Iowa, who attended the high school at Davenport ad later the State University of Iowa, from which he was graduated June 16, 1909; Laura Edith, the wife of P. R. Bell, of Bennett, Iowa; Benjamin Walter, a resident of Dixon; and James B., the subject of this sketch.
James B. Padgham was about three months old when his parents left their Cedar county home and removed to Dixon, Scott county, where he attended the public schools. Later he was a student in the State Normal School at cedar Falls for one year and having determined to make the practice of medicine his profession he was enrolled as a student in the State University of Iowa, from which he received his degree of M. D. June 16, 1909, at the conclusion of a four years' course. On the 11th of August of that year he took up his residence in Donahue, and in the few months he has been here there have been many occasions on which he has proved his efficiency. As he is becoming better known daily there is every reason to believe that in less than a year he will have built up a large practice.
Shortly after his arrival here, Dr. Padgham was married, September 8, 1909, to Miss Ida Louise Battey, who was born in Hodgeman county, Kansas, July 18, 1886. Her grandfather, William C. Battey, had been a physician, practicing in the vicinity of Muscatine, Iowa, while her father, Dr. Francis H. Battey, was also a member of the medical profession. He wedded Miss Minnie Kniffen and shortly after their union moved to Kansas, later attending the high school at Springdale, Cedar county, Iowa, and at West Liberty, from both of which institutions she obtained a diploma. She was also pupil in the business college at Muscatine. For a period of four years she was telephone girl at the West Liberty exchange and for the two years prior to her marriage was a stenographer, spending half of that time in the employ of Dr. E. T. Kischner, the superintendent of the State Sanitarium for the Treatment of Tuberculosis, at Oakdale, Iowa. She is a young woman of many attainments who should prove of valuable assistance in advancing the interests of Dr. Padgham in Donahue.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William T. Goering Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Goering, Gasseling.

William T. Goering, one of the influential men of Hickory Grove township, was born in Blue Grass township, December 9, 1870, and is a son of Henry G. Goering, a native of Prussia, whose birth occurred June 11, 1929. The paternal grandfather was John Goering. Henry Goering had a natural penchant for books and study and loved nothing better than to delve in a library. In consequence, although he never had any regular schooling, he acquired a great deal of useful knowledge and was better educated than the majority of men. Upon coming to America he was advised to locate in Iowa and for the first nine months of his residence here found employment on a farm in Blue Grass township. For the next three years he rented land and by prudent management found himself in a position to buy a farm, the nucleus of his present property of six hundred and forty acres in Blue Grass township. He ahs a timber tract in addition to this splendid tract of cultivated land, and makes his home on section 10. He was married in 1855 to Mary E. Robison, and they became the parents of thirteen children, of whom seven sons and four daughters are now living.
William T. Goering resided under the parental roof until 1893, when he removed to Colorado and for five years engaged in agricultural pursuits on his own responsibility on a farm fifty miles north of Denver. In 1899 he returned to Iowa and the following year began cultivating his present homestead, although only as a renter. Later he purchased this and is now the possessor of some two hundred acres of valuable land, one hundred and twenty in Hickory Grove township and eighty acres in Blue Grass township. He has met with great success in general farming and stock raising.
Mr. Goering was married January 30, 1895, to Miss Mary Gasseling, who was born on the present home farm, April 7, 1871, her father being J. H. Gasseling. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Goering, namely: Gertrude, Naomi, Aloysius, Harvey and Madeline. Both as a progressive agriculturist and a conscientious man Mr. Goering is a valuable asset to the community.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William A. Barnes Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Barnes, Speer, Vance, Moorhead, Burnsides.

Among the important farmers and stockmen of Blue Grass township is William A. Barnes, a son of Isaac and Lucinda (Speer) Barnes, both natives of Pennsylvania. The father, who was a son of William Barnes, was born in 1816, while his wife, whose birth occurred in Apollo, Armstrong county, was born in August 1830. On the 1st of April, 1865, they came to Scott county, Iowa, where Mr. Barnes bought one hundred and fifty-five acres of land on the boundary between blue Grass and Buffalo townships. He followed farming and as success attended his efforts he invested quite extensively in land, until at his death, July 1, 1889, he was the possessor of five hundred and fifteen acres. Two sons ad two daughters were born to him and his wife: William A., the subject of this sketch; John D., who married Minnie Vance, a daughter of Richard Vance, of Muscatine county, Iowa, and is now engaged in the drug business in Chicago, Illinois; Nancy, who became the wife of M. E. Moorhead; and Ella S., who makes her home with her brother William A. The mother died November 15, 1908.
William A. Barnes was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, January 30, 1859, but received the greater part of his education, however, in Scott county, for he was little more than six years of age when his parents removed to this state. Reared to the life of a farmer, he has followed it as his vocation, and on the death of his father inherited one hundred and fifteen acres of timber land in Muscatine county, which he has held as an investment. It is from his arable fields that he has derived his success, for he has tilled the land with care and diligence, and, being thoroughly conversant with agricultural methods, has known the character of crops best adapted to the soil. While he has consistently followed diversified farming, he has devoted considerable time to the stock business, making a specialty of raising shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. This branch of his business has proved most profitable, so that he well deserves to be numbered among the successful men of
Blue Grass township.
It was in 1890 that Mr. Barnes was united in marriage to Miss Minerva Burnsides, a daughter of Amos Burnsides, of Buffalo township, and a descendant of one of the early families of Scott county, for her grandfather, James Burnsides, was one of its pioneers. Three children have been born to them, namely: Chester, Wilma and Roland, all of whom are at home.
Mr. Barnes is a consistent member of the republican party and for the last twenty-five years has served as school treasurer. With a realization of the advantages of educational institutions of high grade, he has steadily given his support to progressive measures and everything that is calculated to advance the welfare of his fellow citizens. While he is ever interested in public affairs he has never sought any public office.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Maurice F. Donegan Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Donegan, Lucey, Martin.

Maurice F. Donegan, a practitioner at the Davenport bar since 1901 and now filling the office of city attorney, was born in Welton, Clinton county, Iowa, on the 2d of September, 1871. As the name indicates, he is of Irish lineage. His father, Jeremiah Donegan, a native of the Emerald isle, came to the United States when seventeen years of age and after living in various parts of the country went to California in 1849, attracted by the discovery of gold on the Pacific coast and the business opportunities incident thereto. After a few years spent in the west he returned to Ireland on a visit but in 1853 again came to America and settled in Clinton county, where he secured and followed farming until his death, which occurred in 1895. He wedded Miss Mary Lucey, who was born in England but was of Irish lineage.
Maurice F. Donegan was reared on a farm with the usual experiences and environment of rural life and pursued his early education in the district schools, after which he continued his studies in Dewitt high school and in Creighton University at Omaha, Nebraska, from which institution he was graduated with the class of 1895, the degree of Bachelor of Arts being then conferred upon him. He afterward pursued a post-graduate course in Georgetown University in the District of Columbia, where he won the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. He pursued a two-year's law course in the same institution and continued his preparation for the bar in the Iowa State University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1901.
Immediately afterward Mr. Donegan located for practice in Davenport, where he has since remained. He was in partnership with E. M. Sharon from 1903 until 1908, and the firm enjoyed a liberal clientage. In the latter year, however, he with drew from that association, having been elected city attorney, which position he now fills. The local press has said of him: "The thorough preparation for his work which his scholastic years gave him and the ambition to succeed which that preparation evinced, were high recommendations to the friendship and assistance of his employer. A close association proved him not only willing and anxious to succeed by hard work but, having unusual character and traits of individuality, made the association as partner agreeable and eventually beneficial.
On the 29th of November, 1905, Mr. Donegan was married to Miss Mary I. Martin, a native of Davenport and a daughter of C. D. Martin; of this city. They now have one son, Charles Maurice, who was born July 5, 1907. Donegan is prominent in the Knights of Columbus lodge. He has served as its recorder and has held the office of chancellor for three years. His standing in his profession is indicated in the fact that in 1904 he was called to the presidency of the Davenport Bar Association, a position which he filled with dignity and credit. He is modest and quiet in demeanor, free from ostentation and display, yet is a congenial companion and one whose true worth gains him many friends. His strong intellect and the analytical trend of his mind are evidenced in the success which he has achieved and I the excellent service which he is now giving to Davenport as its city attorney.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


August N. Heden Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Heden, Hogberg, Rowley.

August N. Heden, residing at No. 1426 Bridge avenue, Davenport, is a retired harness maker, whose persistent labor in former years brought to him substantial return. He was born in Sweden, March 8, 1831, and is a son of Gustave and Christina Heden, both of whom spent their entire lives in Sweden. August N. Heden is indebted to the schools of his native country for the educational privileges he enjoyed and after putting aside his text-books he learned the harness maker's trade. He worked in a number of places in Sweden and in other parts of Europe and in 1869 he came to America, for his fellow countrymen had sent back favorable reports concerning business conditions in the United States. He landed at New York on the 2d of May of that year and made his way directly westward to Chicago, where he worked for about four months. He then went into the interior of the state, where he was employed as a harness maker in various places until he determined to make Scott county, Iowa, his home.
It was in February, 1876, that Mr. Heden settled in Davenport and soon afterward secured employment in the harness department of the Rock Island Arsenal, where he was employed for more than thirty-one years. He then retired in 1907 and is now enjoying a well earned and richly merited rest.
Ere leaving his native land Mr. Heden was married in Sweden, on the 1st day of April, 1864, to Miss Caroline Hogberg, and they have had seven children, three of whom died in childhood, while one died at the age of twenty-two years. Mrs. Heden was born in Sweden, April 27, 1837. the surviving children are: Emma A., who resides at home and is a public-school teacher of Davenport, Edith C., who also lives at home and is instructor in writing in the Davenport schools; and Phillip E., of this city who married Katherine Rowley, by whom he has three children, Richard R., Katherine M., and Phillip E. The children were all provided with good educational privileges and are a credit and honor to their parents. The two daughters built the fine residence which the family occupy, while Mr. Heden built the adjoining dwelling. He worked persistently year after year in the Arsenal and his long service there was proof of his excellent workmanship, his reliability and his energy. His fellow workmen and those under whom he served entertain for him high regard and in the long years of his residence in Davenport he has made many friends.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Charles H. Suiter Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Suiter, David, Bartine, Dennis, Shaff, Dennis, Pollock, Morey.

Each opportunity that has been presented in the life of Charles H. Suiter has been improved by him for further advancement. This has led to his present position as cashier of the Farmers Saving Bank of Princeton. He represents one of the oldest families of Scott county, his great-grandfather, Philip Suiter, having located here in 1834. He entered land in Le Claire township and was identified with the development and improvement of this section of the county until his death. His son, John H. Suiter, the grandfather of our subject, was a rapids pilot on the Mississippi river for many years, and it was his son, Zach G. Suiter, who became the father of our subject. The father was born on the old homestead farm near Le Claire in 1852 and throughout his entire business career followed the river as a pilot. He wedded Miss Angeline David and they had a family of six children: Grace, the wife of C. W. Bartine, an attorney of Pierre, South Dakota; Elmer M., a druggist of Murray, Idah!
o; Charles H., of this review; Zach G., Jr., who makes his home in Scott county; and two who died in infancy. The father died June 13, 1907.
Charles H. Suiter was born in Le Claire, January 5, 1886, and at the usual age began his studies in the public schools, competing he went to northern Idaho, where he worked in the mines for a few years. Returning to LeClaire he became assistant cashier in the Le Claire Savings Bank, holding that position one year. He then came to Princeton and accepted the position of cashier in the Farmer's Savings Bank at this place. The bank is capitalized for ten thousand dollars and is managed by the following officers: J. H. Shaff, president; J. D. Dennis, vice president; and Charles H. Suiter, cashier. The service is characterized by integrity, accuracy, promptness and courteous treatment of customers and Mr. Suiter is ever interested in keeping the management of the bank up to its present standard. In addition to his work at the bank he also handles real estate and is engaged in the insurance business. He is also a notary public.
Charles H. Suiter was married on the 25th of June, 1908, to Miss Anna I. Pollock, a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Morey) Pollock, of LeClaire. They have an infant son, Charles, Jr., born August 13, 1909. Mrs. Suiter was born at herald, South Dakota, but her parents afterward removed to LeClaire where they still reside. Mr. Suiter is a Mason, belonging to Snow Lodge; at LeClaire, is also an Odd Fellow, belonging to Swan Lodge of Princeton and he likewise holds member ship with Ebony Camp, No. 35, M. W. A. at Princeton. His success in the business world ahs been uniform and rapid. He thoroughly enjoys home life and takes great pleasure in the society of his family and friends and all who know him entertain for him the warmest regard and his estimable wife shares with him in the esteem in which he is held.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


August Henry Dorman Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Dorman, Moorhead, Dutcher, Dougherty, Wenks, Frank, Metzger, Schroeder, De Lap, Patnoe, Earl, Oxner.

August Henry Dorman, a representative of financial interests in Scott county, is now bending his efforts to administrative direction and executive control as the cahier of the Buffalo Savings Bank. He is one of the best known residents of the town of Buffalo, whither he came with his father, Henry Dorman, in 1855. the latter, well known as one of the pioneer business men here, erected a home and store building and conducted a mercantile enterprise, continuing in the same until a few years ago, when he retired. Reared under the parental roof, August H. Dorman benefited by the instruction offered by the public schools and by the business training which he received under his father's direction, for at a suitable age he entered the store and assisted in the conduct of the business. As he advanced in years and experience the management of the enterprise more and more largely devolved upon him. Withdrawing from the mercantile enterprise, he engaged with the Hammond Packing Company as traveling salesman and represented that house upon the road until the organization of the Buffalo Savings Bank, when he accepted the position as cashier, in which he ahs since continued. He is also one of the stockholders of the institution, which has been placed upon a paying basis. The bank was organized may 1, 1909, and capitalized for twelve thousand dollars, with S. H. Moorhead as president, J. G. Dutcher, vice president and A. H. Dorman, as cashier. These officers are members of the board of directors, together with J. W. Walsh, of Davenport; Ed. Dougherty, of Long Grove, Iowa; Charles Wenks; C. R. Frank, of Buffalo; Joseph Metzger and Charles H. Dorman of Buffalo; and Rudolph Schroeder. The institution has conducted all departments of business that are in harmony with legitimate banking and the conservative policy inaugurated is winning a growing and substantial patronage.
In 1873 Mr. Dorman was married in Buffalo to Miss Robie De Lap, of Buffalo, and unto them have been born four children: C. E., who is manager of the Hammond Packing Company of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; A. Harold, who wedded a Miss Patnoe and makes his home in Buffalo; Francis Earl, who is employed by the Citizens Trust & Savings Bank in Davenport; and Daisy, the wife of E. W. Oxner.
Mr. Dorman attends the Methodist Episcopal church. His life, honorable in all of its relations and its purposes, has won for him the high esteem and good will of those with whom he has come in contact and his fellow townsmen have expressed their confidence in his political integrity by electing him to several village offices. In the discharge of his duties he has ever been prompt and reliable and whether in office or out of it has always been a stalwart champion of projects and movements that have promoted public progress.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William Braithwaite Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Braithwaite, Seed, Barraclough.

William Braithwaite, whose demise occurred on the 18th of December, 1904, made his home in Davenport for almost a half century and was actively identified with its industrial interests as a blacksmith. He was born in Lancaster, England, on the 21st of December, 1814, his parents being Thomas and Jane (Seed) Braithwaite, both of whom passed away in that country. He attended the common schools until fourteen years of age and then began learning the blacksmith's trade, working as an apprentice until he had attained his majority. By that time he had become thoroughly familiar with the trade in every department and was able to make anything from a common nail to a locomotive frame, using his own drawings. In 1852, having determined to establish his home on this side the Atlantic, he set sail for the United States in company with his wife and one child, landing in New York on the 24th of July. The following Saturday he secured employment and worked at his trade in New York for about twenty-two months, on the expiration of which period he removed to Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, where he accepted a position as foreman in the blacksmithing department of the Susquehanna Railroad shops. At the end of two years he journeyed westward to Laporte, Indiana, but illness was prevalent there and soon afterward he came to Davenport, arriving at this place in April, 1856. Here he entered the Rock Island Railroad shops and in a short time was made foreman of the blacksmithing department, which position he held continuously for a period of thirty-four years, when he retired from active life. His long retention in the service of the corporation speaks volumes for his capability and faithfulness as an employee. In April, 1857, he had purchased a lot at the corner of Fourteenth and Farnam streets from Antoine LeClaire, who bought it from the Indians. Mr. Braithwaite paid twelve hundred dollars for the property and during the summer erected the residence which remains his home until the time of his death and in which his two daughters are still living.
On the 29th of February, 1836, Mr. Braithwaite was united in marriage to Elizabeth Barraclough, who birth occurred in Yorkshire, England, on the 22d of December, 1809. all of their children are deceased with the exception of two daughters, Sarah and Jennie, who reside in the family home at No. 1408 Farnam street. The wife and mother was called to her final rest on the 8th of March, 1882.
Mr. Braithwaite exercised his right of franchise in support of the men ad measures of the republican party and at one time served as alderman from the fifth ward. He was a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity and, though not a church member, contributed liberally to the cause of charity and religion. An unfortunate countryman sought his aid in vain and there are many who have reason to remember his timely assistance with gratitude. He passed away on the 18th of December, 1904, at the venerable age of ninety years. He enjoyed an unassailable reputation for honesty and integrity of character, was kindly in spirit, generous in disposition and faithful to every trust.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


stender.jpg (150949 bytes)Henry Stender Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Stender, Harder, Arp, Vieths.

Henry Stender is a member of the Holstein, Germany, colony, which may be said to be a section of that old-world province transplanted within the limits of being Hans and Margaret (Harder) Stender, good German citizens how followed farming and passed their whole lives in their native land. They had the following five children: Dietlieb, who died in Germany; Lina, a resident in Germany; Henry of this sketch; Julius, who came to the United States in 1884 and is at present a citizen of Montana, and Mary, who died in Germany.
When a young man twenty years of age, Henry Stender came to the new world as so many of his associates had done before him. He first set foot on American soil June 27, 1874, no doubt a somewhat forlorn and doubtful youth, for he had been courageous enough to come quite alone. By advice, he journeyed west to Scott county, Iowa, and was so well pleased with the associations he formed here that he has remained ever since. For the first seven years he earned his livelihood as a farm hand and then found himself in a position to contemplate matrimony. Upon his marriage in 1881 he began the cultivation of a rented farm and was engaged in this fashion for the next eight years. In 1888 he purchased the farm upon which he now resides, a tract of two hundred acres located in section 28, Hickory Grove township, and at present a fine piece of property in a high state of improvement. He prospered sufficiently to add to his holdings a farm of one hundred and twenty acres on section 35, the same township, which he rents to another.
Mr. Stender was married in 1881 to Miss Cecelia Arp, a native of Hickory Grove township, where she was born May 1, 1860, and where she has always made her home. Her parents were Hans and Abel (Vieths) Arp, natives of Holstein, Germany. Her father came to America when eighteen years of age and her mother, who was born June 4, 1834, passed away January 12, 1906. To Mr. And Mrs. Stender have been born seven children: Hans, who died at the age of three months; Amanda, who died when one year old; Louis, at home; Rudolph, residing at Avoca, where he holds the position of assistant cahier of the Avoca Sate Bank; Hugo, Henry, and Hilda, at home.
Mr. Stender gives loyal support to the men and principles of the democratic party. He has been honored with several of the public trusts and for the past decade has been treasurer of the Fairview school district, No. 3. for two years he has been one of the directors of the Farmers Savings Bank of Walcott. His life record is inspiring, for without means he came to a strange land and has become a man of influence and property.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Henry Sindt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Sindt, Stoltenberg, Horst, Bennewitz.

With the passing away of Henry Sindt in 1898 Walcott lost one of if not its most public-spirited citizen, who for more than twenty years had been prominently connected with the business interests and public affairs of the city. One of Iowa's native sons, his birth occurred in Davenport on October 9, 1850, his parents being Thies and Abel (Stoltenberg) Sindt, both natives of Holstein, Germany, where the father was born o the 19th of November, 1824. The year 1847 witnessed the arrival of the parents in America, the family home being established in Davenport, where they were married. The father followed the tinner's trade until 1855. He then took up the occupation of farming in which he was engaged for a number of years. He still survives at the age of eighty-five years, and makes his home in Davenport, where he is living retired from active labor, enjoying a well earned rest.
Henry Sindt, whose name initiates this review, was the eldest in a family of eight children, and under the parental roof passed the period of his boyhood and youth. At the usual age he was sent as a pupil to the public schools of Davenport, and in Bryant & Stratton Business College of that city received thorough and comprehensive commercial training that well equipped him for the practical and responsible duties of business life. In 1873 he came to Walcott and the succeeding two years were devoted to the occupation of farming, after which, in 1875, he became identified with hotel interests, conducting a hostelry up until 1895, three years prior to his death. His excellent business training and his good judgment and wise discrimination well fitted him for carrying on such an enterprise, and with the passing of the years his establishment proved a most profitable and paying investment. The proprietor believed in providing the very best at all times, recognizing that there could be no better advertisement than satisfied patrons, and the hotel, modern and up-to-date in all of its appointments, became well known throughout the locality for its excellent service and was the favorite stopping place of a large number of persons visiting this community.
It was on the 22d of February, 1873, that Mr. Sindt was united in marriage to Miss Catharina Horst, a native of Holstein, Germany, and a daughter of Jochim Horst, who also became a citizen of Walcott. Four children came to bless this union, of whom two are still living, namely: August, a resident of Lake Park, Iowa; and Clara, the wife of Robert Bennewitz, of Walcott. Alma passed away on the 29th of May, 1904, at the age of eighteen years, while Laura died in 1876 when eleven months old.
Fraternally Mr. Sindt belonged to the Ancient Order of United workmen of Walcott, while politically he gave stalwart allegiance to the principles of the democratic party. Public-spirited to an eminent degree, he at all times cooperated in every movement which had for its object the advancement and upbuilding of the community. His fellow citizens, recognizing his ability and worth, called him to various positions of honor and trust, and for nine years has served as trustee of Blue Grass township. For six years he filled the office of township clerk and from 1888 until 1894 acted as a member of the county board of supervisors, also serving as township constable for seventeen years. Faithful and efficient at all times in the discharge of the duties that devolved upon him in his public office, he was not only popular with the members of his own party but won the honor and esteem of his political opponents and no citizen of Walcott occupied a higher place nor more richly merited!
 the respect and admiration of his fellowmen than did Mr. Sindt. He was equally well known in the social circles of this city and therefore the news of his death, which occurred on the 9th of June, 1898, caused a feeling of personal loss throughout the entire community, with the affairs of which he had been so closely and thoroughly identified during the period of his residence here. His widow still survives and makes her home in Walcott, where she is highly esteemed by all who knew her for her many excellent traits of heart and mind.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Charles W. Pinneo Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Pinneo, Pinneaux, Stricker, Ritch, Bell, Fairbanks.

Charles W. Pinneo has completed the three score years and ten allotted by the Psalmist as man's span of life and is now living retired in the village of Princeton, where he owns some valuable property. For a long period he was identified with the agricultural interests of Princeton township and for almost four decades was a factor in the educational work of his section of Scott county. His life covers the period of Iowa's great development, and he is a son of one of the pioneers of this section of the state whose energy, courage and progressive spirit made possible the conditions which are now enjoyed by all.
Giles M. Pinneo, the father of Charles W., is especially deserving of mention on the honor roll of Scott county's early settlers, and his name frequently appears as that of the man who was a leader in various affairs. He was born in Waterbury, Vermont, April 10, 1809, and was a son of Giles Pinneo. The family is of French descent and was established on this side of the Atlantic by Jacques Pinneaux and a brother, who fled to America at the time of the French revolution. Giles M. Pinneo, Sr., the grandfather of Charles W., Pinneo, and his brother Daniel served in the American war of 1812, while two sons of the former, Giles and Haswell Pinneo, enlisted in Lincoln's troops at the time of the Black Hawk war. Haswell Pinneo was in active service through-out the conflict, but the other was taken sick and never did duty upon the field.
Giles M. Pinneo, the father of our subject, lived in the vicinity of Waterbury, Vermont, until of age, receiving his education in the public schools there. In 1832 he came west, settling first near Rock Island, Illinois, where he worked for Judge Spencer. In the fall of 1833 he crossed the river and took up a claim in Pleasant Valley township, where he secured at the government price three hundred and twenty acres of prairie land, which is still in the possession of his son Charles W. Pinneo. He did not live upon that tract at first, however, but he and his brother Haswell H. built a house upon the river bank, in which they kept bachelor quarters for a year. Then Giles M. Pinneo married and removed to his own farm I Princeton township, the claim for which is the first recorded in the books of the township, and thereon he built a log cabin, in which he and his wife lived until 1855, when he erected a fine brick house that is still standing. He made other improvements on the !
place and later went to Sangamon county, Illinois, to purchase two cows and a bull, which were the first cattle brought to Princeton township.
Giles M. Pinneo occupied a prominent place in his township and county, being the incumbent of some office through the greater part of his active life. He took the first assessment in Scott county and made his own books of foolscap paper, as it was impossible to get books for the purpose here. He also served as supervisor for a number of years. He was one of three commissioners appointed to find a location for the county seat of Polk county and it was largely through his influence that in 1846 Des Moines was determined upon, which later on led to the location of the state capital there. He and a friend, Wilbur Warren, built the first schoolhouse here, bringing all the lumber and doing all the work themselves, and Mr. Pinneo was instrumental in establishing the first Sabbath school. Later he was a member of the school board and was ever a potent factor in advancing the educational opportunities of his locality. In politics he was a democrat until 1856, when he became a stalwa!
rt republican, while his religious allegiance was given to the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he frequently held office. The cause of temperance always found in him a strong advocate. Indeed, he was a man who was ever at the head of any movement for the public good and was well and favorably known throughout Scott county and this section of Iowa. He claimed that he had witnessed the greatest miracle ever wrought for the benefit of man, namely, the transformation of the wild,  unbroken prairie into the fertile farms and prosperous towns now to be seen in this county, and in his death, which occurred July 5, 1895, the community lost one of the valiant men whose labors had been so effective in bringing about this change.
In November, 1837, Giles M. Pinneo was married to Miss Asenath Stricker, who was born in Clark county, Indiana, in 1818. In their family were three children, namely: Charles W., the subject of this sketch; Sarah, the deceased wife of Charles Ritch; and Mary E., who lives upon the old homestead. The wife and mother endured all the hardships of pioneer life bravely and was called to her final rest in 1861.
Charles W. Pinneo was born in Princeton township, December 25, 1839, and has spent his entire life in this locality. After completing the course in the district schools he entered Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa, but was compelled to leave school after the second year on account of his mother's death. Thereupon he returned to the farm, which he operated in the summer, while in the winter he taught school. As a teacher he was connected with the schools of Princeton township for thirty-eight years, for twenty-two years of that period having held classes in the same room. In 1882 he removed to Princeton and taught in the village school until 1897, when he laid aside active business. He still retains possession of three hundred and thirty acres of farm land he inherited from his father and owns the fine town property where he lives. Like his father he has participated in the public life of the township, for he served as trustee for twenty years, was clerk of elections a n!
umber of times and was a member of the town council. He has also rendered valuable service tot eh cause of education as a member of the school board, and his influence has always been exerted in behalf of improvement.
In Chicago, Illinois, December 24, 1868, Mr. Pinneo was married to Miss Josephine E. Bell, a native of Machias, Port Maine. Her father, Dr. George L. Bell, owned considerable land in this county and for a short time practiced medicine here, but his but his professional labors were for the most part confined to Boston, Massachusetts. He died in Chicago in 1891. His wife, who was Miss Eliza A. Fairbanks in her maidenhood, was born November 9, 1817, and is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Pinneo have on son, George M., who was born June 7, 1874, and is now a railroad man.
Mr. Pinneo holds active member ship in Independent Order of Odd Fellows society and has passed all the chairs of the lodge. The circle of his friends, however, is not limited by the number of his fraternal brethren, for he is widely and favorably known in this county, where his entire life has been passed and where he has so directed his energies and his activities as to win the respect and good will of those who have known him through a long period. Not only have his labors been productive of financial success, but he has been also afforded many opportunities to do a large measure of good for others, and the memory of his deeds will survive even after he has passed away.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


rann.jpg (87961 bytes)Fritz Rann Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

To view the picture of Mr. and Mrs. Fritz Rann that accompanies this biography, please go to the main Scott county, Iowa page at: http://www.celticcousins.net/scott/ and click on Pictures/ Documents section.

Surnames: Rann, Rusch, Stearhmann.

A valuable farm of two hundred and ten acres in Cleona township still pays tribute to Fritz Rann, although he has put aside the active work of the fields and is now living retired in Davenport. He was for many years busily engaged in tilling the soil and his labors brought him the success which enables him now to rest from further effort. He was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, September 6, 1844, and is a son of Frederick and Louisa Rann. The father was a laborer there and remained in his native country until 1872, when he and his wife came to America, joining their son Fritz, who had some time before crossed the Atlantic. They both died in Davenport, the father when eighty-seven years of age, the mother when about fifty-five years of age. In their family were three children: Fritz; Peter, who is a retired farmer living in Muscatine, Iowa; and Henry, whose home is in Omaha.
Fritz Rann attended school in Germany and afterward learned the cooper's trade, but followed farming in Germany until he came to the United States. In 1870 he landed at New York and made his way direct to Davenport. Soon he secured employment as a farm hand in Scott county and worked inthat way for about five years, after which he went to Nebraska, where he rented a farm. Two years later, however, he lost all of his money and returned to Scott county. Here he again worked as a farm hand in Cleona township and they lived thereon for about two years, after which they removed to Davenport, where Mr. Rann has since made his home.
Mr. Rann has been married twice. In 1880 he wedded Miss Minnie Rusch, who died in 1895. In the fall of the same year he wedded Louisa Stearhmann and unto them was born one child, who died in infancy. Mr. Rann now rents his farm and from it derives a good income, so that he does not have to resort to active labor for a livelihood. He is a member of the Claus Grothe Gilde and is well known among the German-American citizens of the county. All entertain fro him confidence and good will.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Bernard M. McMahon Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: McMahon, Keating.

Bernard M. McMahon, street commissioner of Davenport, belongs, doubly to the city by birth as well as by choice. He was born here, July 17, 1861, his parents being James and Mary (Keating) McMahon, and is of Irish extraction on both sides of his house. His father, who was a native of County Clare, Ireland, had already received his education when he decided to try his fortune in the land to which so many of his countrymen had come. Upon arriving in America he did not tarry long on the eastern coast, but became one of Davenport's earliest settlers. He was an active, dauntless, man, or as his son is fond of designating him, a "hustler," who tinctured every situation with flashes of keen wit and an abundance of good humor. He reared a large family of children, his home being situated at No. 418 Division street, where the subject of the sketch still resides. His death occurred in 1902.
Bernard M. McMahon was prepared for life in St. Anthony's School, from which in due time he was graduated. He crossed the threshold of his business career as an assistant to his father in the contracting business and since then no other occupation has appealed to him sufficiently to cause him to deviate from the path entered by him at that time. Like his father he has been very successful in his special line of endeavor. It was his distinction to lay the first brick pavement in the state of Iowa, this being in Clinton about twenty-two years ago, and the never varying excellence of his work and honesty of his dealings has given him an enviable reputation throughout Davenport. Three years ago the city council appointed Mr. McMahon to his present office as street commissioner, and since taking charge he has made several changes advantageous to the city in the management of its affairs. He is recognized to be a man who has the best interests of the public at heart and the estee!
m of all those who know either him or his work follows as a matter of course. He is a devoted member of St. Mary's Catholic church, and his fraternal relations extend to the Knights of Columbus and the Stone Masons Union.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


John Haak Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Haak, Kohrdt, Oldendorf, Meier, Gruenewald, Hetzel, Mason, Barbour.

One of the most enterprising young business man of Davenport is John Haak, manager of the Davenport Leaf Tobacco Company, which is located at 319 Western avenue. A native of this city, he was born August 7, 1872, a son of Ferdinand and Caroline (Kohrdt) Haak. The father was born in Elmshorn, Germany, about four miles from Hungary, in 1845, his parents being Carsten and Lesette (Oldendorf) Haak. Carsten Haak was man of means, who came to this country in 1857 and began farming in the vicinity of Davenport. He died in 1888. His son, the father of our subject, came here at about of twelve years, completing the education he had begun in Germany in the schools of Davenport. His early life was spent upon a farm, but when he reached manhood he learned the trade of a cigarmaker, became foreman of a factory, and then, in 1870, engaged in his present business, which has grown to be one of the largest in the west. In it he had the assistance of his son John, the subject of this sketch. He was married in 1867 and became the father of seven children: Minnie, now the wife of Charles Meier; Pauline, the wife of E. Gruenewald and the mother of one child; John, the subject of this sketch; Richard, living in this county, who is married and has two daughter, Ermia and Elsie; Edna and Elsie, who are at home; and Theckla the wife of Frank Hetzel, of Sioux City, Iowa. The father belongs to the Turners and is a director in the Iowa National Bank.
John Haak received his early education in the common schools of Davenport and then took a commercial course in the business college here, after which he learned the trade of cigarmaker under his father's tutelage. He worked for the latter until 1896, when he branched out for himself, organizing the Globe Cigar Company. This business he conducted profitably until February, 1905, when a severe fire destroyed his father's establishment. Thereupon he sold his plant to the latter and engaged in leaf tobacco buying and selling. He started in a small way but through good management has brought his business up to the present high standard it now enjoys. Indeed, he is the only man in his section of the county who goes into the fields and buys his stock. In consequence he obtains the very best and in its freshest condition, so that he is able to dispose of it quickly and profitably, hampered by few competitors. He has evinced strong business qualities, is keen in discovering opportunities and, having made a reputation for honesty, his word is as good as his bond.
On the 19th of October, 1899, Mr. Haak wedded Miss Mae Barbour, a daughter of John and Katherine (Mason) Barbour, of Ainsworth, Iowa. Three children have been born to the couple: Minnie, Gertrude and Ferdinand, Jr., all of whom are attending school. Mr. Haak belongs to the Turners Society and to the fraternal lodge of the T. P. A.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Mrs. Kathryn W. Bluedorn

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Bluedorn, Petersen, Hencher, Kurt, Schumacher, Sepke, Specie, Eggers.

Mrs. Kathryn Bluedorn, who owns a valuable tract of one hundred and fifty-nine acres in Davenport township, is the widow of Frederick O. Bluedorn and a daughter of August and Kathryn Petersen, who were among the very early German settlers of Scott county. They came from Germany in 1843 and upon their arrival here took up from the government the tract now occupied by their daughter. It was prairie land, and had never known the touch of plow or harrow, so that it was a difficult task that confronted the family when they set out to make their home in the new world. Mr. Petersen broke the land, prepared it for cultivation and instituted some of the improvements which now adorn the property.
On this homestead, Mrs. Bluedorn began her life, April 30, 1850. She was enrolled as a pupil in the district school of the locality, but owning to the death of her father, while she was still a child, she was forced to leave her lessons before well advanced in her studies and assist with the great amount of work there was to be done at home. She was but little more than eighteen years of age when, on the 10th of November, 1868, she gave her hand in marriage to Frederick Bluedorn, who had been born in Germany in 1840 and had come to this land with his parents, Charles and Louisa Bluedorn, when he was about fifteen years of age. He settled first in Davenport, where he worked at the trade of a cabinetmaker and later engaged in farm labor in the township of Davenport. After his marriage he assisted in the operation of the farm belonging to his wife but was called to his final rest in 1892.
Mrs. Bluedorn became the mother of eleven children. Emelia married Vernard Hencher, of Davenport, and they have two children, Adolph and Florence. Gustave, who is residing in Sheridan township, wedded Miss Anna Kurt, and they have three daughters, Norma, Mildred and Malinda. Rosie became the wife of William Schumacher, of Davenport township, and they have on daughter, Rosie. Rudolph married Miss Rosie Sepke. They live in Walcott, Iowa, and have four sons, Herbert, Rudolph, Edgar and Carl. Theodore, who lives in Sheridan township, wedded miss Emma Kurt, and they have three daughters and one son, Edna, Ermal, Hilda and Stella. Emanda married Adolph Specie, of Davenport township, and they have one daughter, Ella. Fannie became the wife of John Eggers, of Davenport, Iowa. Frank lives at home and operates his mother's farm. The other three children died in infancy.
Mrs. Bluedorn has experienced the many hardships which fell to the lot of those courageous men and women who sought to make a home for themselves in this country in the early years of its settlement, but she has also surmounted all the trials of that period and in addition to being well situated now she has the satisfaction of knowing that her children have grown to a useful maturity and, having profited by her teachings, hold honorable positions in their respective communities.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William Warnock Bailey, M. D. Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Bailey, Warnock, Campbell, Metzler, Ferguson, Deal, Sinclair

Dr. William Bailey is engaged in the general practice of medicine in LeClaire and stands high among the members of the medical profession in Scott county. He was born just across the Mississippi river in Rock Island county, Illinois, January 23, 1866, a son of James and Margaret (Warnock) Bailey, and is of Scotch-Irish descent. The father was born in County Down, Ireland, January 7, 1829, and came to the United States when a youth of nineteen years, accompanying his parents, Robert and Jane (Campbell) Bailey. The family home was established in Rock Island county and Robert Bailey being a stone mason by trade, became a pioneer in this line that county. He also entered eighty acres of raw land there, which he later improved, making his home thereon until the time of his demise. This place eventually came into possession of his son James, who for a number of years engaged in general farming and cattle raising, and as his financial resources permitted he extended the boundaries of his farm until it comprised two hundred and forty acres. He became one of the influential and enterprising men of that community, where he lived until 1897, when he was called to his final rest, his death occurring on the 18th of August of that year. He was a member of the United Presbyterian church and held various official positions, taking an active and helpful part in all departments of the church work. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Margaret Warnock, was likewise born in County Down and was a little maiden of seven years when she accompanied her parents, John and Mary (Campbell) Warnock, on their trip across the Atlantic to the United States. After a long and wearisome journey of twelve weeks on the water they located in St. Louis, Missouri, the year of their arrival there being 1848. In the following spring they continued their journey to Rock Island county, Illinois, where the father purchased land. This tract was situated in Rural township and Mr. Warnock thus became identified with the early development of the locality as an agriculturist, and both he and his wife passed away on the home farm.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. James Bailey were born eight children, as follows: Mary, who is still at home; Anna, who holds the principalship of the Ridgeview school in Moline, Illinois; William W., of this review; Jennie the wife of Roland Metzler, a farmer of Rural township, Rock Island county; John, who also resides in that township; Hugh W., who graduated from a veterinary college in Chicago and is now engaged in practice in Orion, Illinois; Ella, the wife of Roy Ferguson, of Henry county, Illinois; and Betsey, a teacher in the schools of rural township, Rock Island county.
Dr. William W. Bailey was reared to the pursuits of the home farm during the period of his boyhood and youth and in the meantime he pursued his studies in the district schools near the homestead in Rock Island county. He remained under the parental roof giving his father the benefit of his services until he had attained his majority and then for five years engaged in teaching. He used this means of livelihood merely as a foundation for a higher calling and having decided upon the profession of medicine as a life work, to this end, in September, 1894, he entered Marion Sims Medical College, the medical department of St. Louis University. He pursued a three-years' course, graduating from that institution in April, 1897, standing fourth highest in a class of ninety. During the vacation seasons he did special work in Rebecca Hospital of that city and thus gained a practical knowledge of medicine. Soon after his graduation, may 30, 1897, he opened an office in LeClaire and from that time to the present has engaged in general practice. In the years that have passed he has built up a good patronage and is numbered among the successful physicians of Scott county.
The Doctor was married December 27, 1894, to Miss Anna Mae Deal, a daughter of Henry and Sarah A. (Sinclair) Deal, residents of Rural township, Rock Island county, Illinois. They have one daughter, Grace.
Dr. Bailey is a Mason, belonging to Snow Lodge, No. 44, at LeClaire and to the Mystic Shrine at Davenport. He likewise holds membership relations with the Woodmen of the World, Modern Woodmen of America and the Court of Honor. In politics he is a republican and is a member of the town council and is president of the school board, while he is financially interested as a stockholder in the LeClaire Savings Bank. He is a man of culture and sense, generous to friend or foe, and his life of industry has brought a rich reward in the high estimate his acquaintances place upon him as a physician and a man.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann



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