BIOGRAPHIES

Henry G. Thompson, M. D. V. Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Thompson, Weber, Sparks.

Henry G. Thompson, a prominent veterinarian and stock raiser, was born in Dubuque, Iowa, in 1871, and is a son of T. T. and Laura (De Lamar) Thompson. The father lived for many years in the vicinity of Dayton, Ohio, and followed agricultural pursuits. His birthplace was New Jersey, and he was one of the first settlers in the part of Ohio in which he made his home. The grandfather, John Thompson, was also a native of New Jersey, and passed most of his life in the east. The grandmother's maiden name was Weber.
Henry G. Thompson received his schooling in Dubuque, attending both the lower and higher departments. He later matriculated at McKillip's Veterinary school in Chicago and graduated with the degree of  M. D. V. From early boyhood he had taken an unusual interest in all animals, particularly in horses, which natural bent determined his subsequent career. He engaged in stock raising and proved so successful that he was put in charge of several stock farms in Iowa and Minnesota. After engaging in his profession for five years in the latter state, he came to Davenport and has made his residence here for two years past. This period has been of sufficient duration for him to make a name for himself and to secure recognition as an expert in his line of endeavor.
On April 30, 1906, the foundations of a congenial domestic life were laid in Dr. Thompson's marriage to Miss Esther Sparks. The presence of a little daughter, Margaret Henrietta, adds brightness to the home, which is pleasantly located in flat 5 of the apartments at 404 Brady street.
Dr. and Mrs. Thompson belong to the Presbyterian church and may be relied upon to lend a helping hand to its good causes. While comparatively a new member of the community, Dr. Thompson has exhibited those qualities which have recommended him to his fellow townsmen as a citizen of value, at the same time taking high rank among the practitioners of the veterinary science.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Hannibal H. Fridley Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Fridley, Mounts, Churkey.

The strength and determination to succeed despite the presence of many obstacles-characteristics strongly evident in the pioneers of Scott county-are traits which Hannibal H. Fridley inherited as his birthright. His mother, who was Miss Harriet Mounts in the days of her maidenhood, enjoyed the distinction of being the first white girl born within the boundaries of this county. It was the 2d of September, 1835, when she was brought into the world. Jacob Fridley, the father of our subject, was born in Augusta county, Virginia, although that section of the state was later included within the boundaries of West Virginia, March 27, 1820. In his young manhood he came to Scott county, and after some experience here bought the tract of land in Buffalo township on which his son, Hannibal H. Fridley lives today.
It has, in fact, always been the latter's home, for upon it he was born January 15, 1862. Here he grew to manhood, attending the public school of the district until he was thirteen years, when he was compelled to assume some of a man's responsibilities upon the farm. In the thirty odd years that he has cultivated it with a determination to win from its soil the largest returns possible, he has become more attached to it. It has, to be sure, rendered him large returns for his labors, but it is also associated with many memories which have come to have a real place in his life.
In 1892 Mr. Fridley was married to Miss Annie Churkey, a daughter of Beard Churkey, of Iowa county. They have become the parents of four children, namely: Lincoln B., who was born February 20, 1893; Luella M., who was born October 21, 1894; Virgie F., who was born June 14, 1896; and Jacob T., who was born March 27, 1898.
Since he ahs been of an age to exercise his right to vote, Mr. Fridley has invariably given his support to the candidates of the republican party, as the choice of an organization in whose principles he places the greatest confidence. While he has not been active in public affairs, he has been sincerely interested in the subject of popular education, and, as president of the school board he has exerted his influence in bettering the lower grads that those who are compelled to leave their studies early may have the best training possible. Mr. Fridley's is a life worthy of all praise and he has devoted himself unquestionably to what he considered his duty, winning a gratifying measure of success.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Cyrillus Wirth, M. D. Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Wirth, Benziger, Monike, Barnes

The medical profession of Scott county fid a worthy representative I Dr. Cyrillus Wirth, who not only has an extensive private practice but is also health officer for the city of Princeton and also for Princeton township One of Iowa's native sons, his birth occurred in Bellevue, Jackson county, on the 9th of July, 1869, his parents being Dr. J. G. and Regina (Benziger) Wirth. The father, who was born in Switzerland in April, 1811, was there reared and enjoyed excellent educational advantages, being a graduate of Heidleberg University, Germany. For several years he practiced medicine in his native land and in Germany, and then, in 1860, sailed for the United States, locating in Cincinnati, Ohio. He remained there for only a few months, however, and then went to St. Louis, form which place he removed to Dubuque, Iowa, and later, in 1862, settled in Bellevue, where he practiced medicine until his death, passing away in 1894. He was a great sportsman, being an excellent shot, a!
nd belonged to a number of gun clubs, including the American Sharpshooters Association, winning a fine gold watch at one tournaments. His wife still survives at the age of sixty-seven years and makes her home in Bellevue. By her marriage to Dr. Wirth she became the mother of four children, of whom our subject is the eldest. The others are: Elizabeth, who is engaged in teaching school in Bellevue; Guido, conducting a real-estate business in Van Horn, Iowa; and Phoebe, the wife of W. L. Monike, of New York city.
Cyrillus Wirth spent the years of his boyhood and youth in Bellevue and acquired his literary education in the public schools of that city, passing through consecutive grades until his education in the public schools until his graduation from the high school in 1885. Then, deciding to follow in the footsteps of his father and in preparation for a professional career, he went to Chicago, Illinois, where he entered the Chicago college of Pharmacy, continuing his studies therein during the years 1886 and 1887. In the latter year he successfully passed the state board examination and in 1890 and 1891 attended the College of Physicians & Surgeons of Chicago. He was graduated from the Keokuk Physicians & Surgeons Medical college, on the 7th of March 1893, with highest honors, having been awarded the faculty gold medal for first place in the class.
In 1894 Dr. Wirth was registered as pharmacist, and, thus well equipped for the duties of his chosen calling, he opened up an office in Bellevue for the practice of his profession. He remained there for only three years, however, after which he went to Van Horn, Benton county, Iowa, where he practiced for seven years, and at the expiration of that period removed to Cedar Rapids, remaining in that city for a similar period. In 1908 he opened an office in Princeton and has since been engaged in the practice of medicine in this city. Although he ha resided here but a short time he has already gained  almost gratifying practice which is not confined merely to the limits of the town but extends throughout the surrounding territory. He is well equipped by training for the successful conduct of his life work and has ever kept in close touch with the progress that is continually going on in the medical world, while he fully realizes the obligations that devolve upon him in his prof!
ession and performs his duties in a conscientious manner. His ability is recognized alike by his patrons and his brethren in the medical fraternity, a fact that is indicated in his appointment to the position of health officer for the city of Princeton and also for Princeton township, in which office he is now efficiently serving.
It was on the 4th of July, 1891, at Central City, Iowa, that Dr. Wirth was united in marriage to Miss Laura E. Barnes, a daughter of Seymor L. and Harriett E. Barnes, and unto this marriage has been born one daughter, Lyra. The father of Mrs. Wirth was an old soldier of the Civil war, belonging to company F, Fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry.
Dr. Wirth's religious views are indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church, while in politics he gives his allegiance to the socialist party. He is a well known figure in fraternal circles, holding membership in the Star of the West Lodge, No. 1, K. P., of Cedar Rapids, with the Modern Brotherhood of America at Cedar Rapids and also with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Highland Nobles at Princeton. He is medical examiner for the court of Honor and also for the Woodmen lodge at Princeton. He ahs in his possession an old brass druggist's mortar which has been in the family for a great many years. It was made in 1658 and weighs six pounds, and is a relic of which Dr. Wirth is very proud.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Harry J. Frank Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Frank, Pryor, Jones, Hageboeck.

Harry J. Frank, sole proprietor of Frank's Foundry, is one of the many citizens of Davenport who believe that they can do their best work when engaged in business for themselves. About ten years ago he organized the concern of which he is the head, starting it upon a small scale. It has steadily advanced, however, until it has made a place for itself among the flourishing industries of the city.
Mr. Frank was born in Akron, Ohio, December 28, 1842, a son of Isaac and Melissa (Pryor) Frank. In the place of his birth he received his education and there learned the trade of a molder. At the age of nineteen years he left his home, thereafter following his profession in various cities throughout the country. He went first to Chicago, where he engaged in the foundry business. After a sojourn there he returned to Akron, Ohio, where he was employed upon the lakes for a season, but with the hope of bettering his fortunes he went to California. Upon his return east, after one year's experience, he located in Omaha, Nebraska. Going back to Akron, Ohio, he was married and then returned to the west.
At Denver, Colorado, Mr. Frank was located for the next ten years and later found employment in Leadville, Colorado, for two years. It was about twenty years ago that he came to Davenport, where he was first employed as foreman by the Davenport Foundry & Machine Company, and while in that position saw an opportunity of embarking in business for himself whereby he might increase his income and make a respected place for himself in the community. In consequence he established Frank's Foundry, which has become one of the leading enterprises of the kind in the city. Although he operated it for a time alone, alter he took his brother with him and, as his health failed, assigned more and more the cares and responsibilities to him.
In 1877 Mr. Frank was united in marriage to Miss Mary Anna Jones, of Akron, Ohio, and they have become the parents of eight children: Walter and Jennie, who are deceased; Eleanor, who married Arthur Hageboeck; Grace, who is at home; Harry, a student at Purdue University; Helen, a senior in the high school of Davenport; and Thomas J. and George Dewey, who are also in school.
Mr. Frank belongs to the local lodge of the Independent Order of odd Fellows and to the Columbia Sick Society, while he is an honorary member of the Iron and Molders Union. As the success which he has won in the business world is due entirely to his own efforts he enjoys the proud distinction of being one of the self-made men of this republic.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Emil Priester Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Priester, Leptien.

A large percentage of the citizens of substantial worth in Scott county have come from or trace their lineage to the fatherland. Among this number is Emil Priester, who now follows farming on one hundred and sixty acres of land lying partly in Butler and partly in Lincoln townships. This property is owned by his father, Fritz Priester, who is mentioned on another page of this volume.
It was upon the old home farm that Emil Priester was born on the 15th of July, 1877, his parents being Fritz and Wilhelmina Priester, whose names indicate their German ancestry. He has lived on the farm all his life and in his youthful days divided his time between the pleasures of the playground, the duties of the schoolroom and the work of the fields on the old homestead. He gained practical knowledge of the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops and in the year 1901 he took charge of the farm, which he has conducted continuously since. He raises good crops and at the same time makes a specialty of raising Duroc Jersey hogs, light Brahma chickens and Bourbon red turkeys. He utilizes the latest improved machinery in carrying on the work of the fields and the place is equipped with all the modern improvements and accessories that constitute features of a model farm of the twentieth century. He is also a stock holder in the Farmers Elevator Company of Eldridge.
On the 17th of October, 1900, Mr. Priester was married to Miss Louisa Leptien, a daughter of William and Minnie Leptien, of Cleona township. Mrs. Priester was born in Davenport and on the 20th day of September, 1881, in which city her parents settled on coming from Germany to the new world, the father there entering the employ of the Mueller Lumber Company. Later he turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits and is now engaged in farming in Sheridan township. Unto  Mr. and Mrs. Priester have been born three children, Wilma, Athol and Elna, but the second child died September 8, 1908, at the age of five years and eight days.
Mr. and Mrs. Priester have many friends in the community and their own home is a hospitable one. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias of Eldridge and his life is in harmony with its beneficent principles.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Charles Thodt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Thodt, Hinrichsen, Koehler, Rohwer, Adrian.

No better testimony of the industry and thrift which was characteristic of the life work of Charles Thodt can be given than one of the well improved farms of one hundred and sixty acres which he left to his heirs when he passed to his reward on the 26th of October, 1908. For half a century he had been associated with the people of Scott county, for it was in Long Grove that his birth occurred, March 4, 1858. Through the period of his youth, and early manhood he remained in the home of his parents, Jochim and Catherine (Hinrichsen) Thodt, the former a native of Holstein, Germany. When a young man he emigrated tot eh new world and the year 1851 witnessed his arrival in Scott county, Iowa. He assisted in building the Rock Island Railroad through this county and became a well known citizen of this section of the state. He was married here, his wife being a widow with five children. By her marriage to Mr. Thodt she became the mother of  a daughter and son but the daughter, Emma, passed away at the age of two years, leaving our subject as the only child of that union. The mother was called to her final rest September 25, 1881, and following her demise the father made his home with his son for thirteen years, when he met death in Davenport by drowning in April, 1895.
Charles Thodt remained at home until he was twenty-four years of age, when he established a home of his own by his marriage on the 3d of January, 1882, to Miss Jette Rohwer, who was born in Allens Grove township, January 10, 1857. Her parents, Claus and Magreatha (Koehler) Rohwer, were both natives of Germany, the father emigrating to the new world in 1848, while the lady whom he afterward made his wife arrived three or four years later, their marriage being celebrated in Scott county. Both still survive and they now make their home in Donahue, this county.
Following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Thodt began their domestic life on the present home farm, which Mrs. Thodt had previously received from her father. This place comprises on hundred and sixty acres located on sections 29 and 32, hickory Grove township. All the buildings which are here seen were erected by MR. Thodt and for many eyars he devoted his time and energies to its cultivation, and also raised stock. He was a stockholder in the Walcott Savings Bank and in the Farmers Elevator of Walcott. Besides their property in Scott county, the family owns a section of land in Osceola county, Iowa.
A democrat in his political views, Mr. Thodt served s road supervisor for ten years, while for sixteen years he was trustee of Hickory Grove township. For twenty-three years he likewise acted as secretary of the independent school district, which included three schools. Fond of hunting, he belonged to the Schuetzen Verein, a German shooting organization at Marysville. Although he performed many acts of kindness and did much public service of an important character, he never spoke of this in social intercourse but such acts are kept in remembrance and the importance of those services acknowledged. His example is an object lesson to those who come after him and long after all recollection of his personality shall have faded from the minds of men the less perishable record may tell the story of his life and commend his example for imitation.
With the widow, five children survive the father's death. These are: Katharine Mary, the wife of August Adrian, of Osceola county, Iowa; Robert J., of the state of Washington; and Henrietta Amanda, Carl Christian and Alfred Henry, all at home. The fifth in order of birth, Martha Margaretha, died at the age of sixteen years. The family is a prominent and highly respected one in the community and the hospitality of their pleasant home is extended to many friends.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William Murrison Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Murrison, Macklem, Lundy, Krouse, Long, Marti Schlegel, Balch.

For more than fifty years William Murrison has been a resident of Sheridan township and annually derives rich harvests from his eighty-two acres, which are a part of the tract of one hundred and sixty acres which constituted his father's estate. Successful in his own affairs he ahs also won the regard and esteem of his fellow citizens and at their behest has rendered valuable service in different capacities to his township for a long period of years. He was born in Canada, thirty miles from Toronto, August 22, 1846, his parents being Alexander and Mary Ann (Macklem) Murrison. The father was a native of Scotland, his birth having there occurred September 2, 1808. He attended school in the old country and learned the trade of a shoemaker, but at the age of seventeen crossed the Atlantic alone and took up his residence in Canada, where he worked at his calling, was married and lived until 1852, when he came to the United States. For five years he resided in Michigan, during which time he was engaged in shoemaking, farming and teaming, and then in 1857 removed to Scott county. He had come here some years previously, however, and bought one hundred and sixty acres, for which he paid the government price of one dollar and a quarter an acre, but the tract was unbroken prairie and after he brought his family to  the county they lived for a year upon a rented farm, until the ground could be plowed and some improvements made upon it. He built thereon a small house and in 1858 the family made it their home, he himself residing there throughout the remainder of his life, or until August 4, 1899, when his demise occurred. During the long span of his years he had witnessed the great development of the country. When he came here first wolves roamed over the prairies, and Indians were frequently seen. The first year he lost all his crops, because of the quantity of the rain fall, and for many years after was obliged to work at this trade in order to supplement the income he derived from his farming, but later, through diligence and perseverance, he was able to win a large return for his labors. He also occupied an important position in the public life of his township, for he rendered efficient service as school director and road supervisor. His religious support was given to the Baptist church of LeClaire township, of which he was an elder. In his death, Sheridan township lost one of her esteemed citizens.
While still residing in Canada, Mr. Murrison had wedded Miss Mary Ann Macklem, who was born in that country March 16, 1817, and after the death of her husband she lived at Wilton until her death, December 2, 1909, at the age of ninety-two. She was a daughter of James and Anna (Lundy) Macklem and her maternal grandfather, Mr. Lundy, owned the farm on which the battle of Lundy's Lane was fought, it having been so called from the fact that the British and American forces met upon her ancestor's property. Through her marriage Mrs. Murrison became the mother of nine children, as follows: George, who is deceased; Susie, who is the wife of Martin Krouse, of Davenport; James, of Wilton, Iowa; William, who is the subject of this sketch; Mary J., who became the wife of John Krouse, of Wilton, Iowa; Ellen, who is the wife of Emanuel Long, of Mount Vernon, Iowa; Thomas and Andrew, were twins and have passed away; and Nancy, who is residing in Davenport township, this county.
William Murrison, whose name introduces this review, attended school for a short time in Michigan and after his parents established their home in Scott county, he was a pupil in the district schools here. It was but a meager education he received, however, for at best the training was but crude and the many duties attendant upon pioneer life prevented him from giving much time to the preparation of lessons, so that he had to look to practical experience for substantial training for the responsibilities of life. He was twelve years of age when in 1858 he came to live upon the farm which is now his home, and in the half century that has passed he has devoted himself diligently to the cultivation of its fields. Knowing the nature of the soil he has made a study of the crops best adapted to it and to the climate, and every year reaps a harvest whose size is indicative of his skill as a husbandman. In addition to the cultivation of the fields he has also engaged in raising hogs,!
 deriving from both branches of his business an ample income. He has exhibited keen sagacity in his operations, thereby being able to conserve his resources and derive the greatest good from them.
On the 28th of February, 1872, Mr. Murrison married Miss Christina Marti, a native of Winfield township, Scott county, and a daughter of Bartholomew and Anna Barbara (Schlegel) Marti. The parents were born in Switzerland, but came to Scott county among the early settlers, having established their home here in 1852. Two daughters have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Murrison. Margaret, the elder, is the wife of Edwin Balch, of Chicago, Illinois and Nookie lives at home.
Mr. Murrison has been called by his fellow citizens to fill several offices of trust and responsibility. He was elected to the secretaryship of the schoolboard, a position he held for twenty-one years, while he is still a member of that body. Twelve years ago he was made justice of the peace and has been the incumbent of that office continuously since, the fairness and ability he has shown in applying the law winning for him the respect and esteem of his friends and neighbors. Fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen of the World at Long Grove. There has been no esoteric phase I his career; in his private affairs as in his public life, he has held to high standards of honorable manhood so that he well deserves the success which has attended his labors and the good will which is universally accorded him. Mr. Murrison has just bought a fine modern home in the village of Eldridge where he expects to move with his family this year (1910), but will still retain the management of his present farm.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Otto Helbig Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Helbig, Bronlee, Gearhart, Sebelieu, Schweizer, Koehler, Creighton.

Otto Helbig, who passed away at his residence, 331 East Fourth street, Davenport, October 4, 1900, had been for thirty-three years one of the more important business men of this city. He was born in Neumark, Germany, March 22, 1835. His parents, Christian and Mary Helbig, spent all their lives in that province of the fatherland, where the former pursued the trade of a miller.
Otto Helbig obtained a good education in the schools of his native town, which remained his home until he was approaching young manhood. Then he decided to come to America, hoping to prove to himself the richness of the opportunities said to lie here. On coming to Davenport he learned the trade of a butcher, at which he worked as an employe for a number of years. Later he established a shop of his own first at Fourth and Rock Island streets but subsequently he removed to Iowa and Fourth streets, where he had a small place of business upon the rear of a lot. As he gained a substantial return from his business venture he was able to buy a lot and erect a large and modern brick building upon it. In this, his new quarters, he conducted operations of the next thirty-three years. Making every effort to satisfy his customers, he soon gained a large patronage, his shop being generally known as the place where the best meats and vegetables in season could be procured at moderate prices.
Mr. Helbig was twice married. His first wife was Miss Sophia Gearhart, of Clinton county, and their union was blessed with three children: Mrs. John Bronlee, Mrs. August Sebelieu, and Otto W. After her death Mr. Helbig married again, his second wife having been Miss Caroline Schweizer, to whom he was united March 22, 1881. She was a daughter of Herman and Clara (Koehler) Schweizer. Two daughters have been born of this union: Louise who became the wife of James H. Creighton; and Birdie, who having graduated from the Davenport schools, is now living at home with her mother.
Mr. Helbig belonged to the United Workmen of America and with the members of his family was a consistent adherent of the Lutheran church, very active in its work and generous in its support. Mrs. Helbig is now residing at 1516 LeClaire street.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Lewis E. Roddewig Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Roddewig, Lehnhardt, Chamberlin, Kruse, Petersen.

It would be difficult to find in the later generation a young man held more securely in the affections and confidence of his fellow townsmen than Louis E. Roddewig. He was born in Davenport, march 4, 1880, and his career has already been of greater promise than that of the usual young man of his years. He is of Teutonic stock, his father, Frederick William Roddewig, having been born in the German Empire. He was a seventh son and in accordance with the custom of the country was named for Emperor Frederick William. Early in life he transferred his citizenship from Germany to America and in 1854 located in Davenport, where he engaged in the cigar business. In 1902 he retired and now finds leisure to enjoy the associations of a home which has been his for over half a century. He was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Lehnhardt, also a native of Germany, who when a young girl accompanied her parents on their removal to the United States. Her father, Ernst Lehnhardt, located near Buffalo, Iowa, and became a successful agriculturist.
Louise E. Roddewig attended Davenport's educational institutions when a boy and made good use of their advantages. When he left school it was by no means with the idea that his education was completed. With his ambitions fixed upon becoming an attorney, he entered the office of W. M. Chamberlin and there read saw for several years. Meanwhile coming into connection with public men an interest in public affairs was developed in him as well as an understanding of them, and although remarkably young to fill such an office he was elected justice of the peace for two years. Having served his term, he entered the law department of the State University of Iowa and in 1906 was admitted to the bar. While still a student at the university Mr. Roddewig had the unique distinction to be elected police magistrate of Davenport, assuredly an unusual compliment to a young man not yet out of college and an unmistakable comment on his popularity. He was reelected in 1908 and efficiently fills
that office, at the same time engaging in the practice of law.
On May 19, 1908, Mr. Roddewig was united in marriage to Miss Olga Petersen, a daughter of Theodore Petersen, of the firm of Kruse & Petersen, dry-goods merchants. Mr. Petersen, now deceased, was for many years identified with the commercial life of Davenport.
Since attaining his majority Mr. Roddewig has given his heart and his hand to the principles of the democratic party, and his political activities have been such that they have crowned him with esteem. He has numerous affiliations, being a worthy exponent of Masonry, with membership in Fraternal Lodge, No. 221, and having the Scottish Rite and Shriner degrees. He is identified with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Independent Order of Red Men, and is also connected with the Commercial Club and other Davenport organizations.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Henry Feuerbach Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Feuerbach, Moeller, Dittmer, Soenke, Broeders.

Henry Feuerbach has always resided on the farm in Cleona township which he now occupies. Here he was born July 5, 1870. He is the so of Johannas and Marie Elizabeth (Deitz) Feuerbach, natives of Hess-Darmstadt, Germany, who were married in the old country and came to America about the year 1856. They located in Scott county and were sufficiently pleased with the neighborhood to remain here the rest of their lives, the father taking up farming as his vocation. He died February 9, 1884, at the age of sixty-six years. The mother survives and she and her son are among the largest property owners hereabout. Her holdings consist of some five hundred and sixty acres, three hundred of which are operated by Henry Feuerbach. Mrs. Feuerbach, who now resides in Walcott, was born December 18, 1832. She has two children, Carolina, wife of Henry Moeller of Walcott, and the subject of the sketch. Her husband had three children by a former marriage, these being John, deceased; Philip of Keystone; and Bertha Dittmer, deceased.
The property of Henry Feuerbach consists of the home place on section 36, one hundred and sixty acres on section 18, one hundred and sixty acres on section 17, and sixty acres on section 25, on the Hickory Grove township line, this amounting to five hundred and forty acres of land, all in Cleona township. All the improvements on this very desirable property were made by Mr. Feuerbach and his father. Here he engages in general farming and stock-raising and as an additional interest holds a director ship in the Walcott Savings Bank.
On Christmas ay, of 1893, Mr. Feuerbach and Miss Wilhelmina Soenke were united in marriage. Mrs. Feuerbach was born October 10, 1872, in Blue Grass township, her parents being Hans and Anna (Broeders) Soenke, natives of Germany, but now residing in Davenport. Five children add interest and cheer to their home. These are by name Ferdinand, Mary Anna, Elmer, Ida and Lloyd
Politically Mr. Feuerbach pays fealty to the democratic party. He takes a live interest in public affairs and several trusts have been put into his hands as a result of the confidence of his associates. He is now serving his third term as township trustee, is a member of the township schoolboard and for many years has been a trustee of the Walcott Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He is identified with the Walcott Knights of Pythias and the Modern Women of America, and in these fraternal relations enjoys the same high regard that he wins from the public in general.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Peter Dettmer Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Dettmer, Goetsch, Hendricksen, Smith, Ross, Starder, Heckendorf, Poller.

Peter Dettmer, a retired farmer and dairyman, who has taken up his residence in Davenport where he owns considerable town property, is one of the sons of Germany, who, having come to the United States in the hope of bettering his fortunes, ahs achieved his desires to such an extent that he felt justified in retiring from active farming. He was born in the province of Holstein, October 28, 1843, his parents being Peter and Margaret (Goetsch) Dettmer, who passed their entire lives in land of their birth.
In 1864 Peter Dettmer and an older sister came to the new world. They landed at New York, whence they made they made their way to Davenport, as they had relatives living here. On his arrival Mr. Dettmer found employment in a tannery, where he intended learning the trade, but the concern went out of business and accordingly he turned his attention to farming. For a few years he worked for others, but later he and his brother-in-law rented at tract of land which they operated in conjunction until 1871, when they severed their connection and Mr. Dettmer engaged in farming alone. He bought six acres of land and built a little two room house upon it, in which he lived for the next eleven years. He procured at that time about fifty head of cattle with the intention of entering extensively into the dairy business and he was successful in this undertaking for the quality of his products found a ready market. As his income increased he invested in real estate until he owned about on!
e hundred acres, a part of which was included within the boundaries of Davenport, and he divided it into town lots, from the sale of which he derived a handsome profit, a tribute to his foresight in selecting the location he had purchased. After about nineteen years devoted to farming he felt justified in retiring form active participation in that work and now gives his whole attention to looking after his financial interests.
Mr. Dettmer has been three times married. His first wife, who was Miss Anna Hendricksen in her maidenhood, died January 8, 1879. To them were born three children: William and Dora, who are deceased; and Fred, who married Miss Freda Smith and lives on a farm in Rockingham Township, where he is rearing his five children. Mr. Dettmer's second wife was Miss Anna Ross, who has also passed away. They had three children: Lewis, who married Miss Anna Starder and lives in Rockingham township; Paulina, who became the wife of Paul Heckendorf, living on the Rockingham road; and Peter. On the 5th of May, 1906, Mr. Dettmer married Miss Helen Poller, a daughter of W. W. and Helen Poller, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her father was for thirty years superintendent of the United States mint at Philadelphia.
Mr. Dettmer has always taken a keen interest in local affairs, and in recognition of his success and as a tribute to his character as a man, he was elected a member of the board of education, an office he held for five years. He is also a member of the improvement committee of the Fairmount cemetery. Some years ago he made a trip to his old home in Germany. At present he lives in a handsome home which he erected in 1885 and in which he enjoys the many comforts to which his former toil so well entitles him. For twenty years he has been a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Ernst H. Ihms Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Ihms, Lutt, Rolth, Kehl.

Ernst H. Ihms, a successful representative of the agricultural interests of Sheridan township, where he owns a tract of one hundred and twenty acres on which he lives, is one of the sons of the fatherland who in his life work has been able to realize some of the ambition which led him to cross the Atlantic and try the opportunities of the new world.
He was born in Holstein, Germany, August 14, 1853, his parents being Johan and Louisa Ihms, both of whom are deceased. Eleven children were born to them, namely: Claus, who died in Walcott, Scott county, Iowa; John, who is now a resident of Davenport and before coming to America served in the Holstein war of 1848-50; Henry, who died in Russia; Anna, the widow of John Lutt and a resident of Sheridan township, this county; Peter, who is living in Germany; Katie, the deceased wife of Henry Rolth; Christ, of Cherokee county, Iowa; Ernst H., the subject of this sketch; and three who died in infancy.
Ernst H. Ihms enjoyed the educational privileges afforded by the public schools of Germany and I that country obtained some experience in farm work before coming to America. It was in 1871 that he crossed the ocean with the determination to avail himself to the fullest extent of the opportunities for advancement he had heard awaited the man who was willing to work. On landing in New York he came direct to Scott county, for his brother Claus had come here some years before and was residing in Davenport and here he secured work as a farm hand with several persons. Later he rented land in Lincoln township, and in 1892, when as the result of his diligence and careful economy he was able to buy a place, he purchased a tract of fifty-eight acres on which he now lives. Since it has been his home he has made a number of improvements upon it, the character of the buildings and the excellent cultivation of the fields being a tangible evidence of the progressive ideas which have guided him in his work.
It was on the 14th of September, 1880, that Mr. Ihms led to the marriage altar Miss Lizzie Kehl, who was born in Germany, April 3, 1852, and came to Scott county with her brother in 1869. Her parents, John and Louisa Kehl, spent their entire lives in the fatherland and there died. Mrs. Ihms has also passed away, her death having occurred December 9, 1908. She had been a faithful wife and devoted mother, and her loss was deeply mourned by her family and by the large circle of friends her gentle spirit had gathered about her. Five children were born to her and her husband, as follows: One who died in infancy; Emma, who married Ivan Wrisley, of Muscatine, and is now the mother of three children, Ernest, Mina and Lucile; and Detlef, Harry and Ruth, who are at home.
Mr. Ihms holds member ship in the Turners Society of Eldridge, and has there made many friends. The hope that led him to leave his native land and seek a home in America has been more than realized. He here found the opportunities he sought, and, making the most of them, has steadily worked his way upward, until he well deserves to be numbered among the substantial citizens of Sheridan township.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


George S. Shaw Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Shaw, Renwick, Crossett, Ross, Lynds, De Lescaille.

Through the period of his residence in Davenport, George S. Shaw made for himself an honorable position in business circles and a firm place in the affection of his fellow citizens. It is meet, therefore, that his record by perpetuated in the pages of this volume inasmuch as his labors were an element in the progressive business development of the city. He was born in Chelsea, Orange county, Vermont, April 14, 1824, and resided in the east until the outbreak of the Civil war. Within that period he acquired his education and learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed continuously in that section of the country until failing health caused his removal to the west. Hoping to be benefited by a change of climate, he went as far as Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where he lived for a short time. In 1864 he came to Davenport and was identified with building operations as a contractor for a considerable period, being an expert workman at his trade. As time advanced he saw and utilized his opportunities for real-estate speculation and laid out what is known as Shaw's addition, north of the Renwick estate, laying out three additions in all. In 1875 he became a member of the firm of Renwick, Shaw & Crossett, which for a number of years operated a sawmill and conducted a lumber business in Davenport, the interests of the firm being capably conserved so that excellent results rewarded the efforts of the partners. About 1885 Mr. Shaw removed to Cloquet, Minnesota, where his firm purchased two large sawmills, beginning operations there under the name of the Cloquet Lumber company. After a time Mr. Renwick and Mr. Crossett both withdrew, but Mr. Shaw remained in his field of labor, building up a mammoth business in the lumber trade, so that he became known in lumber circles throughout the entire country. In fact he was one of the most prominent representatives of the lumber interests of the north and his success was the legitimate and direct outcome of judicious investment, well directed enterprise and indefatigable energy.
Mr. Shaw always retained a warm place in his heart for Davenport and had intentions of making this city his home again, but he passed away at Cloquet, Minnesota, November 5, 1897. While residing in Davenport he was a member of the city council for a number of years and served as alderman from the sixth ward. He was the most popular alderman ever elected from that ward and the regard entertained for him by his fellow townsmen was manifest in the gift of a gold watch from the people of his ward It was an expression of high regard for Mr. Shaw personally and of appreciation of his official service, which resulted in many substantial benefits for his section of the city.
In 1846 Mr. Shaw united in marriage to Miss Mary Ross, who, surviving her husband for several years, returned to Davenport, where she had many friends. Here she died September 30, 1905. There were four children in the family: Mrs. J. E. Lynds, Mrs. Jules J. De Lescaille, Edward and William. The memory of Mr. Shaw, his kindly spirit, his genial nature, his business integrity and his public-spirited citizenship, are still enshrined in the hearts of many who knew him while he was yet an active factor in the life of Davenport.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Jules J. De Lescaille Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: De Lescaille, Shaw, Stafford.

Jules J. De Lescaille was a resident of Davenport for but comparatively brief period, yet within that time his genial nature won him expressions of warm friendship and he became recognized as a most honorable, upright man. He was born in Belgium in 1849 and was brought to this country when but eight years of age. His education, therefore, was acquired on this side the Atlantic. On the 14th of September, 1884, he married Miss Harriet Shaw and unto them were born four children: Victor, who is now at home; Raymond, who is at Cloquet, Minnesota, where he is learning the lumber business; Mrs. Mary Stafford, a resident of Chicago; and Jules, at home. In 1898 Mr. De Lescaille removed with his family from Cloquet, Minnesota to Davenport, where his remaining days were spent. He manifested in his life many traits of character which won him high and favorable regard and gained him a large circle of friends. In Masonry he attained the Knight Templar degree and in his life exemplified the beneficent spirit of the craft. His religious faith was manifest in his membership in the Episcopal church and he lived in harmony with his professions, seeking to deal justly with all men and to recognize at all times the rights and privileges of others.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Charles Hamann Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Hamann, Petersen, Sebbelen, Schneckloth, Brockman, Arp.

Among Scott county's native sons who are seeking their fortunes in agricultural lines and through their well directed efforts and untiring industry and diligence are meeting with gratifying prosperity, is numbered Charles Hamann, whose birth occurred in Davenport on the 17th of October, 1859. His parents, Henry and Christina (Petersen) Hamann, were both natives of Holstein, Germany, the former's birth there occurring on the 12th of August, 1821, and the latter's on the 10th of September, 1815. In 1856 they came to the United States, making their way direct to Davenport, and with the exception of about four years spent in Clinton county soon after their arrival in Iowa, their remaining days were passed in Scott county, the greater portion of the time being spent on a farm in Cleona township. The father followed the occupation of farming throughout his entire life, and, although a poor man when he came to this state, at the time of his death was the owner of three hundred and!
 twenty acres of valuable land, all well improved and under a high state of cultivation. He passed away on the 28th of June, 1905, his wife's death occurring on the 4th of September, 1899. In their family were six children, of whom our subject was the youngest. The others are: Henry, a resident of Durant; Lena, the deceased wife of Rudolph Sebbelen; Dora, who married Christopher Schneckloth, of Sunbury, Cedar county, Iowa; George, residing in Durant; and Adolph, who lives in Portland, Oregon.
Under the parental roof Charles Hamann spent the period of his boyhood and youth, acquiring his education in the district schools of Scott county. He was about eight or nine years of age when his parents took up their abode on the old homestead, and here our subject has made his home continuously since. At an early age he began working in the fields, assisting in the cultivation of the farm, and under his father's direction learned many valuable lessons concerning the best methods of plowing, planting and harvesting. Agricultural pursuits have always characterized his efforts, for, upon attaining man's estate he wisely chose as his life work the occupation to which he had been reared. He has made a close study of farming, possesses good business ability and is progressive and up-to-date in his methods, and that he has met with gratifying success in his undertakings is indicated by the fact that he is now the owner of three farms in Cleona township, each consisting of a quar!
ter section of land, all under a high state of cultivation. The home farm is located upon section 22, and is a well improved and valuable property, containing two sets of substantial buildings and equipped with all modern conveniences and accessories for facilitating farm labor. In connection with his general farming he also deals largely in stock, raising and fattening from three to four carloads annually. This branch of his business is proving very profitable.
It was on the 4th of December, 1884, that Mr. Hamann was united in marriage to Miss Thrina Arp, a native of Germany, who was born in Holstein on the 30th of July, 1866, and came to Davenport with her parents, who arrived in this country in the spring of 1870. She is a daughter of Hans and Liza (Brockman) Arp, both natives of the fatherland. The father, who was born on the 18th of July, 1841, was a weaver in the old country, but after coming to America was engaged as a farmer and laborer for a number of years. His death occurred on the 19th of April, 1896. The mother, whose natal day was the 11th of August, 1840, still survives and makes her home in Davenport. In their family were five children, as follows: Hans, who passed away at the age of six years; Helena, who died when twenty-one years old; Thrina, the wife of our subject; Julius, residing in Minnesota; and Rudolph, of Davenport. Unto Mr. And Mrs. Hamann have been born eight children, namely: Albert, operating one of his father's farms in Cleona township; Emil, also making his home in that township; and Hugo, Leonard, Walter, Leona, Luella and Leroy, all under the parental roof.
In the political life of the community Mr. Hamann has never taken an active part for, although he gives stalwart support to the principles of the republican party, he has never sought nor desired public office as the reward for party fealty. Public-spirited and loyal in his citizenship, however, he is thoroughly identified with the interests of the community and gives ready cooperation to all measures which have for their object the general progress, advancement, improvement and reform. Having passed his entire life within the borders of Scott county, he has become well known here, the circle of his friends being almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances, and all who know him entertain for him high regard and respect because of his many excellent traits of character.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann