From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

JAMES WELCH, farmer; P.O. De Witt. Mr. Welch was born in County Wexford, Ireland; he came to the United States in 1854; lived in Dutchess Co., N. Y., for five years; came to Clinton Co. in 1859, and settled on the farm he now owns in 1861; he has 212 acres of land. His wife was Catherine Hall, a native of Ireland; they have seven children-James, Helena, Catharine, Mary, Ellen, Ann and John.


History of Counties of Woodbury and Plymouth, Iowa; Will L. Clark, et al.;  Chicago: A. Warner & Co., 1890-91

Matthew Flood, farmer and stock dealer, Battle Creek, was born in County Wexford, Ireland, in 1846, and received his entire schooling in Ireland. He came to America in 1868, and located at Springfield, Illinois, and was naturalized in 1878. After remaining in Illinois eight years, he came to Dallas county, Iowa, and in 1883 to Woodbury county, always engaged as a farmer. His parents, Matthew and Kate (Furlong) Flood, were Irish, and are both deceased. In 1871 the subject of this sketch married Bridget Diskin, whose parents, Michael and Mary (Cusic) Diskin, are both dead. He has five children: Mary Ellen, Katie, Maggie, Mattie and John. All are members of the Catholic church. Mr. Flood is a member of the Farmers' Alliance. He has a farm of 320 acres, all under cultivation, on which he raises mostly corn. At the present time (1890) he has 100 head of cattle and 200 head of hogs.


History of Tama County, Iowa; Springfield, Ill.: Union Pub. Co., 1883.

John Doyle was born in county Wexford, Ireland, in October, 1834. During 1853 he came to America, and first settled in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, where he soon engaged in farming. In 1865 he removed to Scott county, Iowa, and at the end of three years, came to Tama county, settling on section 28, Columbia township, where he now lives on a fine farm of 200 acres. Mr. Doyle was married in 1861 to Miss Ellen Enright, a native of Ireland, and born in 1839. They have ten children living-Annie, born July 31, 1862; Michael, born February 14, 1864; Maggie, born August 7, 1865; John, born February 3, 1867; Maurice, born March 31, 1869; Peter, born August 28, 1871; Dennis, born October 5, 1873; Martin, born November, 19, 1875; Mary, born October 28, 1877; Stephen E., born May 22, 1881.


Portraits and Biographical Album of Jefferson and Van Buren Counties. Chicago: Lake City Pub. Co., 1890. p. 657

     Joseph Warren is a native of County Wexford, Ireland, born July 12, 1814. His parents were Christopher and Sarah Warren, who were both natives of Wexford County. His father was a farmer by occupation, to which pursuit Joseph was reared. The schools of that locality not being good he received but a limited education which however he largely supplemented by reading and observation. He remained at home assisting his father in the management and cultivation of the farm until he was twenty-five years of age. On the 17th of February 1840, he married Miss Mary Ann Pierce who was also a native of County Wexford. After his marriage he engaged in farming for himself and continued to successfully operate a large farm until his emigration to America. That he thoroughly understood all branches of agriculture is attested by the fact that he has in his possession a silver medal, that was presented to him by the Agricultural Association for being the best farmer in the county. In the summer of 1853, he decided to seek a home in the New World and with his wife and four children, sailed for America, landing at New Orleans, and continuing his journey, arrived at St. Louis on the 26th of December of that year. In the spring of 1854, he landed in Van Buren County. He was not without means, for upon his arrival he had about $3,000 as the result of his successful tenant farming in his native land. He located at Vernon Township, where he bought one hundred and twenty acres of land and began the development of a farm. His labors were successful, and he continued to increase his possessions until he became the owner of seven hundred acres. He had been in the county but a few years, when the people recognizing his ability and worth as a citizen elected him to the office of Township Supervisor, and the County Board elected him President of the body. He served his constituents faithfully. He was subsequently elected Justice of the Peace, but not caring to act in that capacity he held the office but a few years.
     Mr. and Mrs. Warren became the parents of seven children, four of whom grew to mature years and are yet living, viz: Christopher, who is a farmer of Vernon Township; Ellen Jane who is the wife of Samuel H. Warren, a successful farmer of Vernon Township, and Sarah who wedded Samuel Herron, of Van Buren Township. Mr. Warren has given his children good educational advantages and provided each with a good farm, though he still retains three hundred and forty acres for his own use and maintenance. Idleness is no part of his nature; he has always been industrious, and though amply able to lay aside all business cares, and spend his declining years in ease and luxury, he still keeps himself employed looking after his farms and stock, not so much as a source of profit, as for the pleasure it affords him. He has acted as guardian for several orphan children, and administrator for the settlement of a number of estates, and in every case his course has been marked by the strictest integrity. In his many and varied business transactions he has never had a lawsuit on his own account. He has been a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church ever since he came to the county, as was also his good wife, whose loss he was called upon to mourn in 1882.
     In the summer of 1888 Mr. Warren visited his native land and spent about five weeks in traveling in that country, and visiting many places of interest, most notably the beautiful "Lakes of Killarney," and the famous "Blarney Castle." On his return to Iowa he felt more strongly than ever his preference for the land of his adoption to that of his nativity. In the public questions of the day he has always taken an interest, and in national elections has supported the Republican party. He is a liberal supporter of the church and other deserving institutions. To the poor and needy he is a friend, to whom he dispenses with charity and genuine Irish hospitality; by reason of a good constitution, correct and intemperate habits he has by several years exceeded man's allotted three-score and ten and is still well preserved, and in the enjoyment of his faculties both physical and mental. He can now look back over a long, busy, and well-spent life of usefulness, with the pleasant consciousness of having in all things honestly endeavored to perform his full duty to God, to his fellow-men, to his family and to himself.
     "Good actions themselves with lasting days. Who well deserves, needs not another's praise."