TIPPERARY BIOS

DOUGHERTY

"From History of Scott County, Iowa 1882 Chicago: Interstate Publishing Co."

William Dougherty, a native of Tiperary Co., Ireland, was born Aug. 15, 1811. Margaret Bryan was born in Ireland in 1855. They were there married about 1833 and came to the United States and landed in New York, where they remained three years, thence to Davenport, Iowa, arriving in April, 1854. He worked at this place in a brick-yard two years, then purchased a farm of 160 acres on section 10, this township, where he lived 20 years; subsequently bought 122 - 1/2 acres more in section six, where he is living at present. Mr. Dougherty values his land at $75 an acre. He is considered one of Scott County's most energetic farmers and has seen the various changes which it has undergone, from a vast prairie covered with grass to one of the finest counties in the state, abounding in highly cultivated farms and comfortable homes, ample evidence to the thrift and economy which the early settlers and their posterity practiced. Mr. and Mrs. Dougherty have had four children, viz.: Bridget, who married John Kennedy, and lives in Le Claire, Le Claire Township; William, who married Kate Kelly, and makes her home in Winfield Township; Edward, married Alice Glenn and resides with his father in this township; and Ellen, who married Patrick Glenn, and resides in Winfield Township. The parents of William Dougherty, Edward and Margaret (Lubey) Dougherty, were of Irish nativity and the parents of two children. Mrs. Wm. Dougherty died March 12, 1872, and was laid to rest at Walnut Grove; she was a member of the Catholic church.

DOUGHERTY

"From Vol. 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

In the development of the natural resources of Iowa and in the promotion of business interests which have had much to do with the upbuilding and advancement of Davenport and the state at large, Edward J. Dougherty took active and prominent part and came to be recognized as most influential in the promotion of business interests, as a leader in financial circles and as a promoter of various mining projects. The extent and importance of his work well entitled him to rank with the representative residents of this city. Mr. Dougherty was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, March 17, 1846, a son of William Dougherty, who in 1851 bade adieu to the Emerald isle and with his family sailed for the new world. Becoming a resident of Davenport, he started the first brickyard in this city. Two years later later he established his family upon a farm on the Utica road and there Edward J. Dougherty remained until twenty-six years of age, his youthful experiences being those that usually fall to the lot of the farm lad. He acquired his education in the public schools and through the summer months worked in the fields.

Two years before leaving the old homestead Edward J. Dougherty was married to Miss Alice E. Glynn, whose father was a prominent farmer of Lone Grove. After leaving the old home place Mr. Dougherty and his family resided on a farm in Sheridan township until 1888, when he purchased the old Brownlie farm on Brady street. There he made his home until he removed to this city and took up his residence in the old Dr. J. L. Reed homestead at No. 1504 Main street. He was one of the organizers of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank and at the time of his death was a director and the chairman of the executive committee of the bank. The extent and variety of his business interests and connections made him one of the most prominent residents of Scott county. His labors contributed in large and substantial measure to public progress and improvement and he well deserves mention with those who have been the real upbuilders of this section of the state. He promoted the Davenport and Southern Railroad and was its first president, continuing in that office until his demise. He promoted and financed the Guaranty Mutual Life Insurance Company, becoming one of its directors, and was chairman of its executive committee. He was also the president of the Scott County Coal Mining Company, the president of Schick's Express & Storage Company, president of the Silvis Coal Mining Company of Carbon Cliff, Illinois, and a director of the Norris Coal Mining Company. As his financial resources increased he made extensive investment in realty and became one of the largest landowners of the county, holding title to twelve hundred and thirty acres in Princeton township, one hundred and sixty-two acres in Butler township, two hundred acres in Sheridan township and one hundred and sixty acres in Lincoln township. He also had extensive holdings in the Dakotas and Nebraska, together with much real estate in Davenport. Whatever he undertook he carried forward to successful completion and his business affairs were ever of a constructive nature, contributing to the general growth and prosperity of the community. He was a man of strong character, of domestic virtues and of moral and religious spirit. He was widely known as an efficient public official, serving for several terms as supervisor during his residence in Sheridan township. In religious faith he was a Catholic and gave generously to the support of the church and its charities. He stood as a splendid example of the type of self-made man. Reared in the growing west, he saw and improved the advantages which Iowa afforded her citizens and in the establishment and conduct of important business interests he became recognized as one of the foremost men of Scott county, his labors being of far-reaching and beneficial effect in relation to public welfare and at the same time constituting a source of substantial individual profit.

CARROLL

A History of Tama County, Iowa Vol II; Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1910.

     Rev. P.J. Carroll has been pastor of St. Patrick's Roman Catholic church at Tama since the fall of 1887, when he was transferred from Fonda, Iowa, to take charge of what was a weak but struggling parish. Under his inspiration and downright hard work, the spiritual and material conditions of the charge assigned to him have completely changed. The Catholic families which he found in the parish were inspired with hope and faith in the work of the church, new households were brought into the fold, and in 1893 educational affairs had become so prosperous that the erection of a school was commenced. It was opened in the fall of the succeeding year; later, the fine parochial residence was completed, and May 28, 1901, the handsome brick church now occupied was thrown open to worshipers. The church property is valued at $30,000, the school property at $10,000 and the parsonage at $5,500, while the charitable and spiritual labors are performed by Father Carroll, and under his counsel and supervision, are invaluable according to earthly standard. The parochial pupils, numbering about one hundred and twenty, are directly taught by the Franciscan Sisters of Mount St. Clair, Clinton, Iowa. They are divided into twelve grades, as to their regular studies, and are also taught music and other special branches.
     Father Carroll is a native of Macon, Georgia, born November 29, 1857, and is a son of Patrick Henry Carroll. In 1847 his father emigrated from Tipperary, Ireland, where he was born, and spent the first few years in this country as a railroad foreman, engaged in the handling of large construction gangs. While thus employed he married Miss Frances Tucker, a native of Frankfort, Kentucky, and of an old southern family, who some years afterward became a convert to Catholicism. Mrs. Carroll owned a plantation in her own name, upon which the couple lived for a number of years, when the family settled in Macon, Georgia, where the husband engaged in the wholesale grocery business. In the fall of 1868 the family homestead was transferred to Jackson county, Iowa, where Mr. Carroll purchased the Wright and Sullivan farms. In that locality, just south of Dubuque, the parents spent some of the later years of their lives. When the father retired from active work the family home was fixed in Dubuque, where he died in the summer of 1878, at the age of sixty-eight years. The mother survived him, spending several years with her son after his ordination to the priesthood and finally passing away at Fonda, Iowa, in 1885.
Rev. Father Carroll was primarily educated in the south; completed his theological course at St. Joseph's College, Dubuque, and was ordained May 28, 1882. His first charge was at Fonda, Iowa, where he built up a strong church through the arduous and trying labors of a missionary priest. It was the nature of his work in that field which caused his transfer to the more metropolitan field at Tama. In addition to his labors there in direct connection with the church and school of his parish, Father Carroll has been foremost in the establishment of such societies approved by the Catholic authorities as the Foresters  and other church societies, and irrespective of religious faith, he is held in the highest respect by the people of the community.

REDDEN

Wolfe's History of Clinton County, Iowa; Vol 2; B.F. Bowen & Co; Indianapolis, Indiana: 1911

     The name of William Redden holds a high rank among the business men of Clinton county. He is a man who would win his way in any locality where fate might place him, for he has sound judgment, coupled with great energy and business tact, together with upright principles, all of which make for success wherever they are rightfully applied, if persisted in,and by reason of the exercise of these principles he has not only won business success but also the confidence and good will of his fellow men.
     Mr. Redden was born in Clinton, Iowa, October 16, 1873, and he is the son of Michael and Elizabeth (McCarthy) Redden, the father born in county Tipperary, ireland, in 1845, and the latter born in Wicklow, Ireland, in 1844.
     The father was a laborer and when a young man he came to Clinton, Iowa, from Ireland; he was an honest man and a hard worker and found ready employment here. His family consisted of four sons, Matthew, Andrew, William, and Ambrose.
     William Redden was educated in the parochial schools of Clinton, and when but a small lad he determined upon a mercantile course, and after leaving school he began clerking in the retail store of Kief & Clancy, learning here the "ins and outs" of this business thoroughly. He remained with the same firm for a period of ten years, giving the utmost satisfaction and proving an excellent employee owing to his promptness, his aptness and his courtesy to customers. He could always be relied upon. In 1900 Mr. Redden and Mr. Donlan, the latter also a clerk at the Kief & Clancy shoe store, started in a retail shoe store of their own under the firm name of Redden & Donlan, located on Second street. In 1906, they moved to No. 215 Fifth avenue, and there they still maintain one of the most popular and best stocked stores in the city. They started in business on a small scale and were compelled to work up the trade, but both being young men of unblemished reputation and of indomitable energy, they succeeded admirably well and now their place of business in known throughout the county and well patronized by both the people of the rural districts and from Clinton and Lyons.
Mr. Redden and all his family are earnest members of the Catholic church.
     On February 15, 1909, Mr. Redden married Flora Herrin, a native of Ohio, born in 1885. She is the daughter of Francis and Agnes Herrin, an excellent family of the Buckeye state. One child, Joseph, was born to Mr. and Mrs Redden on December 8, 1909.

O'MEARA

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

JOHN O'MEARA, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. Delmar; was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1852; when he was 3 years of age, his parents, Patrick and Catherine O'Meara, emigrated to Canada, thence to this county. Mr. O'Meara married Jan. 21, 1874, in this county, Miss Bridget, daughter of Richard and Mary Powers, early settlers of Waterford Township, Clinton Co.; they have two children- John and Patrick, and an adopted child-Thomas E. Mr. O'Meara and wife are members of the Church of the Immaculate Conception, which is situated but a short distance from his farm. He owns 200 acres of finely improved land, possessing many natural advantages. Democrat.

COSTELLO

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

JOHN H. COSTELLO, Sr., farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Charlotte; was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1814. In 1832, he emigrated to Ottawa, Canada, where he married, in 1840, Miss Margaret Burnett. She was also a native of County Tipperary, Ireland; was born in 1815, and emigrated to Ottawa, Canada, in 1838. In 1852, Mr. Costello and family emigrated from Ottawa to where they now reside. He has, by his own exertion and honest effort, accumulated a large and valuable property. He owns 535 acres of land, 520 in one body, where he resides; the rest in Jackson County. His home farm is well improved, and possesses many natural advantages. Mr. Costello and family are members of the Catholic Church. His living children are-Thomas, who is married, and lives in Shelby Co., Iowa; Ellen, now Mrs. William O'Grady, of Bloomfield Township; Mary, married to Simon O'Grady, of Bloomfield Township; John is married and lives in this township; William; Michael; Margaret, now Mrs. William McGonegle, of Bloomfield Township. Deceased are Mathew and Annie. Mathew was Mr. Costello's oldest son. He was born in Ottawa, Canada, Sept. 7,1847; resided with his parents until the breaking-out of the war, when he enlisted in Co. A, 26th Regiment I. V. I.; was a gallant soldier. He was killed at the battle of Arkansas Post, while bearing the flag of his country in front of his company, during a fierce charge. Mr. Costello has been elected to various local offices. During his residence in Canada, he was a member of a militia company, and was elected Sergeant in 1842-43. He was one of the organizers and prime-movers in building the Church of the Immaculate Conception, this township.

HANRAHAN

Wolfe's History of Clinton County, Iowa; Vol 2; B.F. Bowen & Co; Indianapolis, Indiana: 1911

     For a number of years William F. Hanrahan, well known merchant, general stock and coal shipper and grain dealer, of Charlotte, Iowa, has been a potent factor in promoting the progress of Waterford township along material, social and civic lines, consequently his name well deserves a place in the record of the representative citizens of this locality.
Mr. Hanrahan was born in Upper Canada, near Ottawa, March 10, 1837, and was reared on his parents' farm and received a good practical education. He is the son of William and Ellen (Flynn) Hanrahan, both natives of Ireland, he born in county Tipperary and she in Cork. both came to Canada when young, in 1825, and were married there. He was the son of Daniel Hanrahan, a farmer and an early settler in Canada, where he reared his family, an there his death occurred. After this event, in May, 1861, his widow and all the family came to Clinton county, Iowa, the father of the subject having come in the fall of 1860, bought land and returned to Canada and in the spring moved the family here; his mother spent the remainder of her days here, dying at the advanced age of ninety years. Her family consisted of eight children, all of whom settled in this county and all died here. William Hanrahan, who married in Canada, was born in 1802 and his death occurred in 1880, at the age of seventy-eight years. He bought land here and improved it, spending the remainder of his life here. He was very successful as a general farmer and he raised and handled large numbers of livestock for the market, shipping to Chicago. He paid seven dollars per acre for his first land, and by thrift and industry added to the same until he owned to hundred and forty acres. He had one of the best farms and most comfortable homes in the early days here. Politically, he was a Democrat and was a member of the Catholic church. He was a good and useful man in his community, charitable and ready to assist in any good cause at all times, and he was highly respected by all. His wife died in December, 1880, at the age of seventy-two years; she was the daughter of James Flynn, a native of Ireland, where he spent his life. She had three brothers in Canada, James, Thomas, and Patrick, who later settled in New York. Five sons and five daughters were born to the father of the subject, named as follows: Daniel, a farmer, died, leaving six children; William F., of this review; Ellen, Mrs. Magin; Margery, Mrs. T. Dunn; Julia entered the convent and later went to France, thence to South America; Mary, Mrs. Boyle; Nancy A., also a sister at an orphan's home, New York, where she died aged thirty-four years; Thomas, a successful farmer, died leaving five children; Martin, farmer, died in the East; Patrick, farmer, is yet single.
     William F. Hanrahan spent his youth at home and assisted with the farming until he was twenty-four years of age, then came to Iowa and assisted his father start a new home. He then engaged in farming for himself and in buying fat stock and marketing them before the days of the railroads, and was very successful. He continued thus for several years, then, in 1871, he and C. McGinn erected a building at Charlotte and engaged in the mercantile business. After a year or two he bought Mr. McGinn's interest and he has continued to conduct the business alone and has been rewarded with abundant success. In the early days he was obliged to do credit business, and the most he ever lost in one year was about one hundred dollars. his business grew until he was not only busy himself, but his wife and various clerks assisted. He has several farms, and he is also a stockholder in the Farmers and Merchants Bank at Charlotte, Iowa. He has built three valuable properties, which he rents. He has furnished coal to the people of this vicinity for thirty years, and since 1881 he has been engaged in buying and shipping grain. He has been very successful in whatever line he has turned his attention to, and he is one of the leading financiers and men of commerce in this vicinity, and has done as much as any other man for the good of the town and community. During Cleveland's administration he was appointed postmaster and filled the position for four years in a very creditable manner. He has witnessed and been a most important participant in the general development of the town and surrounding country,  and he is widely known and commands the respect and confidence of the people. Politically, he is a Democrat and he has filled the office of tax collector for several years. He has been a notary public since 1876 and he has performed a great deal of successful business. He was reared in the Catholic faith and has never departed from the mother church.
     Mr. Hanrahan was married to Mary O'Toole, who was born in Canada and who has made a worthy and faithful helpmeet. She is the daughter of Thomas O'Toole, of Ireland, who came to Canada in an early day, thence to Clinton county in 1853, having had but very little capital when he reached here. He first rented a farm, later bought and sold farms and engaged in stock raising, feeding and shipping. He made a specialty of grading up young short-horn cattle, visiting cattle countries and bringing young thorougbred stock to this county, becoming widely known as a stock man, and thus by his industry he created a large estate. Politically, he was a Democrat and he filled the office of justice of the peace. His death occurred May 20, 1908. He was a member of the Catholic church and was a good and useful man, honored by all. In his family were ten children, an equal number of sons and daughters, the wife of the subject being the third in order of birth.
     The following children have been born to Mr and Mrs Hanrahan: Frank is assisting his father in the store; Laura is still at home; Charles is assistant cashier in the Farmers and Merchants Savings Bank at Charlotte; Birdie is the wife of Frank Monahan,undertaker; Aloysious is assisting his father in the store; Sarah is at home and is engaged in teaching music.

HUNT

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

W.M. Hunt, a resident of Iowa City, and the owner and proprietor of Huntís Hotel, on College street, south side numbers 18, 20, 22 and 24, near the Opera House; was born July 21, 1839 in Tipperary county, Ireland; came to America in 1854 and landed in New Orleans; came to and settled in Iowa City the same year. He is a butcher by trade. He was married Aug 19, 1866, to Miss Annie Boylan of Iowa City. This union is blessed with four children: Mary J.B., John W.M., Maggie E and Nettie C. The family are members of the St. Patrickís Roman Catholic Church of Iowa City. A democrat in politics, and has been honored with an office at the hands of his party; he served in the city council from the 3d ward in 1878-1879. His hotel is well and favorably known, and the accommodations are good in every particular.

SPAIN

Wolfe's History of Clinton County, Iowa; Vol 2; B.F. Bowen & Co; Indianapolis, Indiana: 1911

     Among the prominent farmers and early settlers of Clinton co, Iowa mention must not be omitted of Michael J Spain, a man of such correct habits and methods that he would doubtless have succeeded in whatever locality he desired to cast his lot, coming as he did from a sturdy northern family who were not accustomed to be discouraged at difficulties or obstacles. He was born in Lower Canada, September 29, 1846, but he has spent the major part of his life in Iowa, having been brought here when five years of age. Here he grew to maturity and was educated in the common schools, having been reared on his father's farm, which he helped to clear and develop, attending the pioneer schools, which were taught three months each winter. He is the son of Cornelius and Margaret (Kenedy) Spain, both natives of county Tipperary, Ireland, where they grew to maturity and were married and where they began life on a farm. They left the Emerald Isle for America in 1815, landing in New York City, soon afterward going to Troy, that state, where they remained one year, then went to South Bend, Indiana, where they remained one year, then to Canada. There Mr. Spain bought land which he improved and continued to reside there over twenty years, having a good farm and a comfortable home. In 1851 he sold out and came to Chicago, Illinois, later went to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Not liking Wisconsin, after visiting various parts of the same, he crossed the Father of Waters, reaching Dubuque, Iowa, in June, 1851, but a few days later went to Minnesota, where he sought a location, but not liking the country, he came to Clinton, Iowa, in the fall of 1851, and bought five hundred acres, erected a log house and soon had some of his land in cultivation. In due course of time he had a large and well improved farm, being very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser, hauling his products many miles to market and enduring many privations incidental to pioneer life. At that time there was not a physician in the county, but the settlers understood the use of herbs and "home remedies".
     Politically the first vote of Cornelius Spain was cast for Mr. Buchanan in 1856. He was at first inclined to support the Whig party, but in 1856 joined the Democrats, to whom he remained faithful. He was a well-informed man on current events, and while he used his influence for the party he never aspired to public life, though he filled some of the township offices. He was a worthy member of the Catholic church. He liked to be neighborly, although when he first came his "neighbors" were about twenty miles distant. He was always ready to help those in need in any way, and he was, indeed, a strong, useful man in his day, and was highly regarded by all who knew him. His death occurred on the old homestead in October, 1867, at the advanced age of eighty-six years; his widow survived until 1884, dying when about the same age that her husband reached. They were a grand old couple. Cornelius Spain, it appears, was the pioneer of his neighborhood and was the first man to start the physical and moral development of the new Eldorado and helped lay the foundation for good government. Through his efforts the first missionary priest came to his neighborhood. Father McKenna having held mass at his house in 1852, after which annual mass was served and later regular mass in the log school house. Thus, for many reasons, no man is more worthy of an honored place in the county's history than Cornelius Spain.
     He and his wife were the parents of thirteen children, namely: Michael, number one, died in early life, as did also Thomas and Rhoda; Catherine, Mrs. Conroy; Bridget died when young; Daniel, a farmer, died in 1875; John, a farmer died in 1905; Cornelius, a farmer, died in 1884; William, a farmer, died in 1888; Michael, the subject, and Mary were twins, the latter dying in 1848 when young; Margaret and Derias also died young.
     Michael Spain, of this review, was reared on the home farm and assisted with the work on the same when he became the proper age and early in life engaged in farming. When thirty-two years of age he married and settled at the old homestead, continuing to operate the place, carrying out the plans which his father inaugurated; he later bought the interest of his brother and he has since added to his place until he now has a fine farm of two hundred and forty acres, all under a high state of cultivation, and he is carrying on general farming and stock raising in a manner that is bringing definite success. He often has as many as one hundred head of cattle in his pastures and feed lots, feeding and shipping about three car loads of cattle each year, also feeds large numbers of hogs. He has an excellent farm and a good group of buildings on the same. Although primarily a Democrat, he is inclined to be independent when it comes to voting. He was reared in the Catholic church and is loyal to the same.
     Mr. Spain was married on July 1, 1879, to Mary J. Britt, who was born in Lyons, Iowa, on September 20, 1859, and she has proven to be a most worthy helpmate. She is the daughter of Thomas Britt, a native of Ireland who emigrated to New York in 1852, and who came to Lyons, Iowa, about 1855. He engaged in farming and contracting on railroad construction work and became a useful and successful man. His death occurred here in 1881. He was a member of the Catholic church and a Democrat. He filled a number of offices, including that of Constable while living at Lyons. His family consisted of three children: George died when young as did also Martin; Mary J., wife of Mr. Spain of this review.
     The following children have been born to Mr and Mrs Michael J. Spain: Cornelius is a farmer, Thomas D. is an invalid; Roger is a farmer; Margaret L, Mary G. and William P. are all at home; Catherine is teaching school; Frank is a student at Dubuque, Iowa; Oretta is a student at the parochial school at Petersville; Marcedes is also attending the same school.

MAHER

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

Mathew Maher, a resident of Iowa City, doing business at No. 12, North Clinton street, of plumbing, gas and steam fitting; was born Feb 14, 1827 in Tipperary Ireland. Came to America April 1849, and to Iowa City in 1865. He was married Feb 14, 1849 to Miss Anna Phillipp of Sheffield, England. They have seven children, five of whom are living: Mary, wife of Henry Sullivan; Sarah A., wife of William Murphy of Iowa City;  Joseph, Mathew and Margaret. The family are members of the St. Patrick Roman Catholic Church of Iowa City. He is a republican in politics.

NOLAN

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

Thomas Nolan, a farmer and stock raiser, residing on section one in Graham twp, post-office address, Morse; was born in 1828, in Tipperary county, Ireland. Came to America at five years, then settled in Graham township, in 1840. He is a son of James and Bridget Nolan, Cedar county, Iowa. They have two boys. The family are members of the St. Maryís Roman Catholic Church at Cedar county, called the Nolan Church, in the Nolan settlement. A democrat in politics.

NOLAN

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

James Nolan, a farmer residing in Union township on section sixteen, post-office address, Iowa City; was born Jan 25, 1822, in Tipperary county, Ireland, came to America in 1834, landed in Jersey City. He came to and settled in Johnson county, Iowa, in 1853. He made the overland trip to California from Missouri, in 1850, from April 10, to August 28. He was married in May, 1842, to Miss Susan Connolly; she died in 1872. They had five children; Thomas, John, James, Jerry and Rose. He was married in 1874 to Miss Annie Welch. The family are members of the St. Maryís Roman Catholic Church of Iowa City. He is a democrat in politics, he never held an office of any kind and would not have one of any kind. He is a true genuine Irish man, fond of his nationality and would not change his sweet Irish accent for any cultivated English accent known to man. A good citizen, respected by all who knew him as an honest and truthful citizen.

PETERS

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

James Peters, farmer and stock raiser, Cedar twp, post office, Morse; was born in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1832. Son of John and Johanna Peters. He came to New York, in 1852, and then moved to Ohio where he lived about eighteen months, when he came to Cedar township, and settled on a farm, and in 1862 he was married to Miss Mary Ryan, daughter of Michael and Mary Ryan of Cedar township. They have seven children living, four boys and three girls. He is a member of the Catholic Church and a democrat in politics. Mr. Peter owns one of the largest farms in Cedar township.

PETERS

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

John Peters, a farmer and stock raiser, resides in Graham township, post-office address, Morse; was born in 1822, in Tipperary county, Ireland, a son of John and Johanna Peters. Came to America in 1848, and lived in New York until 1850, when he moved to Iowa County, in 1855. He lived in Iowa City until 1858, when he moved to Cedar county, Iowa, and lived there until 1864 when he settled in Graham township. He was married in 185? to Miss Catharine Butler of Tipperary county, Ireland. They have seven children. The family are members of the Roman Catholic Church. A democrat in politics.

 

The History of Jackson County, Iowa...Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1879.

LAMEY

Michael Lamey, farmer, Section 31; P.O. Monmouth; wife owns 200 acres of land, valued at $25 per acres; he is the son of Michael and Bridget Lamey; born in Co. Tipperary, Ireland in 1830; at the age of 15 he emigrated with his parents to Monroe county, New York, where they remained but a short time, when they came to Shullsburg, Wisconsin and followed railroading on the I.C.C.R. and on other roads in LaSalle County. In 1856 he came to Monmouth in this county and engaged in the old Lyons and Anamosa railway with his 3 brothers. In the Spring of 1857, went to Dubuque, his father dying shortly after. In the fall of 1857 returned to Monmouth Township, but continuing railroading at intervals up to December 15, 1864 when he married Mrs. Allen Keller, daughter of H.V. Cook, of Sharon Township, Clinton county, Iowa; she was born December 20, 1835 in Erie county, Penn.; she had 3 children by first marriage- Sarah, now wife of Henry Banghart, of Monmouth; Ida M. Carrie S.; by this marriage 7- John, William, Mary, Martha, Maggie, Joan and Charles. Mrs. Lamey is a member of the M.E. church; Mr. Lamey is a member of the Catholic church, Democrat.

MULLANY

History of Dubuque County, Iowa; Weston A. Goodspeed, ed. by F. T. Oldt and P. J. Quigley; Chicago: Goodspeed Hist. Assoc. 1911

     John I. Mullany, a well known legal practitioner of Dubuque, is a native of Ireland, his birth occurring about April 1, 1847, in the County of Tipperary. He is a son of John and Catherine Hutchinson Mullany, both of whom were born and reared in that country. In 1849 the family left the mother country and immigrated to America, first locating in LaSalle, Illinois, and eventually in 1857 coming to Dubuque. The father was an architect and followed that business successfully until his death in 1884, at the age of seventy-two years. His wife passed away in 1873, aged sixty-one years. The early education of John I. Mullany was acquired in the parochial schools of Dubuque and this was supplemented by a course in the College of our Lady of Angels, now Niagra (New York) University. He then took up the study of law in the office of John H. O'Neill and H.B. Fouke, well known lawyers of Dubuque, now deceased, and later embarked in the general practice of that profession on his own account. From 1873 to 1883 he was thus successfully engaged in Dubuque and Clinton, Iowa, but then, owing to failing health, retired from active participation in business affairs. In 1886 Mr. Mullany was appointed deputy clerk of the district court of Dubuque county, and for twenty years honorably and creditably filled this position.
     In 1907, in partnership with Mr. Hugh Stuart, he again took up the general practice of law in Dubuque, securing offices in the Bank and Insurance building, and has since been actively and successfully engaged in his profession. Politically Mr. Mullany is a Democrat: he served for twelve years as a member of the board of education. He is a Catholic in religion and is a member of the Knights of Columbus. Mr. Mullany is regarded as a ready writer, has written for the Catholic Encyclopedia and contributes occasionally to periodicals.
on May 3, 1877, he was married at Dubuque to Miss Agnes C. Murphy, daughter of Michael B. and Margaret S. Murphy, early settlers of Chicago, Illinois, and to them were born seven children. One, Joseph, dying in infancy and the others: Robert E., traveling auditor for the Transcontinental Freight Bureau, of San Francisco; Grace C., librarian of the Clinton (Iowa) public library, died December 1, 1910; Retta, wife of Dr. Charles E. Loizeaux, of Dubuque; Blanche S., librarian of the Dubuque high school library; Marc Hutchinson, a student at St. Joseph College, Dubuque, and Jean C., attending St. Joseph Academy at Dubuque. The family reside at 60 West Locust Street, and they rank socially and intellectually among the leading people of the city.

HOREN

The History of Jackson County, Iowa...Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1879.

James Horen, farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Bellevue; owns 480 acres in Jackson Co. and 160 acres in Jo Daviess Co., Ill. He was born in the county of Tipperary, Ireland, on the 25th day of June, 1818, and at 6 years of age, his parents died, when he was adopted and raised by an uncle, James Kennedy, who lived in Canada; when 14 years of age, he came to Cook Co., Ill, where he lived until he was 20 when he moved to Galena, Jo Daviess Co., Ill, where he resided from 1840 to 1878, when in March of that year, he removed to Jackson Co., Iowa, and settled upon the property now owned by him. He has never held any offices in Jackson Co., although he has for many years held important offices of trust and ability in Jo Daviess Co., Ill. He is a strong old Jacksonian Democrat, and has always warmly supported and advocated the principles of that party. He married Ellen Maddern,  a native of Boston, Mass., in Galena, Ill. in the year 1846, and had ten children, nine of whom are living at the writing of this history, namely, James, John, Daniel, Mathias, Mary, Annie Elizabeth, Ellen and Bridget. He and his family are all members of the Roman Catholic Church. His Jackson Co. lands are valued at $25 per acre and his Jo Daviess lands at $50.

CUMMINGS

History of Crawford County, Iowa...by F. W. Meyers. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J.
Clarke Pub. Co., 1911.

     Few men in Crawford county are more highly esteemed than Henry James Cummings, now serving his second term as sheriff of the county. The respect in which he  is held is due to his fidelity to duty, and a genial and friendly manner which is one of his prominent characteristics. He was born in Clinton county, Iowa, November 11, 1856, a son of Henry James and Elizabeth (Perrey) Cummings, the former of whom was a native of Ireland and the latter of Paisley, Scotland. The father was reared in County Tipperary, Ireland, and after reaching manhood served in the English army. He came to the United States and was married to Elizabeth Perrey at Lowell, Massachusetts. Later they settled in Clinton county, Iowa, where he died at the age of thirty-two years, in 1858, and the mother of our subject passed away in 1894 at the age of sixty-three. He was a Catholic but she was reared in the faith of the Presbyterian church and so continued during her entire work life. Our subject's maternal grandfather, Malcolm Perrey, was a dyer by trade and ran large dye works in Paisley, Scotland, employing several hundred men and women. He lived to be seventy-six years of age and was the father of the following children: Alexander, Robert, Malcolm, Matthew, Elizabeth and Mary. Two sons were born to Henry and Elizabeth Cummings, the elder of whom died in infancy.
     Henry James Cummings, the younger of the sons, was reared in Clinton county and received his preliminary education in the district schools. The mother married again and when he was fourteen years of age he began making his own way in the world, working on a farm for the first four years. He then spent four years in the lumber woods and in rafting and steamboating on the Mississippi river. He followed various occupations and engaged in railroading until 1882, when he bought eighty acres of land in Charter Oak township, Crawford county. His time was devoted to breaking the prairie for three or four years. He started the first dray line in Charter Oak which was , which he operated for four years, then removed to his farm. After two or three years he sold the place and again took up his residence in Charter Oak, becoming a clerk in a store. He served six years as deputy sheriff and performed his duties so creditably that in 1908 he was elected sheriff, being reelected to the same office in November, 1910.
     On the 14th of December, 1887, Mr. Cummings was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie M. Farrell, who was born at Kankakee, Illinois, a daughter of Daniel and Margaret (Moore) Farrell. The parents were natives of Ireland and on coming to this country lived for several years at Kankakee and later in Poweshiek county, Iowa, and at Dunlap, this state. The father died at Dunlap and the mother at Omaha, Nebraska. Six of their children grew to maturity, namely: Peter J., Lizzie M., Daniel J., Anna, Andrew and Mary. Five children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Cummings, Daniel, Rhea, Andrew, Eileen and Peter, but Daniel died at the age of two and one-half years.
     Mrs. Cummings was killed by the cars September 3, 1908. The death of his beloved wife was a grievous affliction to Mr. Cummings and his children, and the entire community shared in the feeling of profound regret at the loss of one of its valued members. She was a sincere member of the Catholic church and a woman possessed of many of the most admirable traits of character, whose life was indeed a blessing to those with whom she associated.
     Mr. Cummings is prominent in fraternal circles, being a member of Sylvan Lodge, No. 507, A.F. & A.M., the subordinate lodge and encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Improved Order of Red Men. Politically he is allied with the democratic party. He has proved a most faithful and efficient public officer and is recognized as one who is fully entitled to the high honor in which he is held.

LLOYD

IOWA HISTORICAL RECORD; VOL. XV. July, 1899. No. 3

     Frederick Lloyd was born in London, May 24, 1826. He was the fourth son of Frederick and Louisa Sherin Lloyd. His father was a native of County Tipperary, Ireland, and served his country as Ensign of 32nd Royal Regiment of Foot, then as Cornet (standard bearer) of 21st Royal Dragoons at Salamanca, Spain, and later as Lieutenant of 91st Royal Regiment of Foot at Jamaica, W. I. While in service at Cape Town, Africa, he married Louisa Sherin, eldest daughter of Captain Sherin of his regiment. She was a native of County Cavan, Ireland. Dr. Lloyd's parents removed to America in 1832 and settled in Dummer, Canada. His mother lived to a good old age, dying in Chicago in 1883. Not long before her death she spent a few years with her son in Iowa City.
     Previous to 1850 Dr. Lloyd went to Louisville, Kentucky, in which place he married Isabella H. Wade, August 21st, 1850, a young lady whom he had met while residing in Canada. Mrs.Lloyd was the second daughter of Rev. Charles T. Wade, a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, and Isabella Hamilton Wade, second daughter of Henry Hamilton, Esq., of Ballymacoll, County Meath, Ireland, and was born at Burkhampstead, Hertfordshire, England, December 16th, 1825. Her paternal grandfather was Robert Wade, Esq., of Clonabraney, County Meath, Ireland. Previous to their marriage Dr. Lloyd had read somewhat in medicine. He entered the Medical College of Louisville from which he graduated and came at once to Iowa City in 1854. Upon the breaking out of the Civil War, Dr. Lloyd, following the trend of the father's life, interested himself in securing volunteers. Upon October 22nd, 1861, he was commissioned as Assistant Surgeon of the 11th Iowa Infantry. June 29th, 1861, he was promoted to the position of Surgeon of the 16th Iowa Infantry and was honorably discharged on September 1st, 1863. He returned to his practice in Iowa City which he continued, with the exception of a few months in 1868, when he visited the scenes of his birth and of the early home of his parents in Ireland, until 1878. At this time he was employed as contract surgeon in the United States Army and served in Montana, New Mexico and Arizona till 1883, when he returned to his practice in Iowa City. The Doctor's youngest brother, Edward, was killed at Resaca, Georgia, May 15th, 1864, while leading the 119th New York Volunteers of which regiment he was Lieutenant Colonel. Soon after Dr. Lloyd's return from the army he was chosen as editor of the IOWA HISTORICAL RECORD, successor to the Annals of Iowa, which he had edited for several years previous to the suspension of its publication by the State Historical Society of Iowa. In this kind of editorial work Dr. Lloyd took special delight and for it he was admirably qualified. He took pains to secure material invaluable in character. He had a wide acquaintance with men interested in historical research and secured their hearty cooperation. The pages of the RECORD for more than fourteen years of its existence bear ample testimony to his industry and his conscientious discharge of duty. Editorial work was not new to him as he had been employed for some years upon the Iowa Capitol Reporter.
     During the later years of his life his inclination lay in the direction of literary work. Several short stories have appeared from his pen in the local papers. They have been bright narratives of events which had come under his personal observation. One prepared for The Youth's Companion was accepted as a prize story. His style was simple and chaste. The language employed was always pure.
     At the time of his death he held a position upon the Board of Examining Surgeons for the Pension Department.
     His death was the result of close confinement on account of an accident which befell him more than a year previous. It was the first death to occur in his immediate family for over forty-nine years.
     His widow continues her residence in Iowa City. Four daughters and two sons survive. Isabella H., now Mrs. L. A. Clearman, of Iowa City; Louise F., Principal of Fourth Ward Public School of Iowa City; Edward S., practicing attorney at Lemars, Iowa; Adelaide C., Librarian of State Historical Society and Assistant Librarian of the City Library, Iowa City; Francis W., a practicing physician at Lehigh, Iowa; and Edith A., stenographer in office of Baker & Ball, Iowa City.
     As a physician Dr. Lloyd was most highly esteemed by those who employed him. To his patients he was more than a physician. He was not satisfied with a visit and a prescription but watched closely the effect of his medicines. His practice could not be extensive under his views of duty, but it was successful and to his watchfulness is due, in the estimation of many, the lives of some who suffered serious illness. With his signal ability in a particular line of disease he was too modest by nature to press his claims for practice. He appeared disinclined in his later years to extend his practice.
     He was timid in presenting himself to persons of distinction in military service with whom he had acted during his term as surgeon in the army. He felt a fear that he might be considered intrusive. But no man enjoyed more keenly the opportunity of conference when presented. A few tributes to the memory of Dr. Lloyd are selected from many that have come to the family.
     His brethren of the Masonic fraternity express their appreciation of the man as follows: During his long residence in this city he was one of our leading physicians and his professional skill and kindly administrations in the home of the sick and afflicted, will be long and gratefully remembered. He was a brilliant and entertaining writer and had he so desired, might easily have won worldwide fame in the domain of letters. In his personal relations he was always the kind, modest, gentle, and generous friend; in the sacred precincts of home he was greatly loved and esteemed; and in the Masonic order he was a true and worthy exponent of the tenets of the mystic brotherhood.
     Dr. Lloyd was a man to be trusted in whatever work of a public nature was assigned him. His acceptance of the trust was a guaranty of its faithful performance.
     Says one: "If any man had occasion in a selfish way to feel aggrieved at the Doctor's course as a pension examiner such was my case, for twice did he oppose an increase in my pension which at the time I felt was my due. But the ground of his opposition seemed to him so tenable that no other course would sustain his sense of justice. So strongly was I impressed with his conscientious performance of official duty, though it came in conflict with his personal desire to please a friend, that I took pleasure in recommending him for re appointment under the present administration. I was sure that though he might make some mistakes, as I felt he had done in my case, he would never use his office for personal benefit."
     Says another: "Dr. Lloyd's candor, courage, and intelligence make his death a serious loss to Iowa history."
     And still another: " After securing a large list of petitioners for the appointment of another to the office of pension examiner, I found that his reputation for probity outweighed the endorsement which hundreds of signatures of prominent men had given another candidate."

FITZPATRICK

The History of Jones County, Iowa; .Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1879

     Johanna Fitzpatrick, farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Anamosa; owns 110 acres, about all under cultivation; born in Ireland, in the county of Tipperary, in 1824; came to America in 1846; her husband, Michael Fitzpatrick, was a native of the same county in Ireland; he came to America in 1844; he died May 21, 1879; he lived in Illinois for twenty-one years and during part of that time was School Director and also, Supervisor; he lived in Jones Co., Iowa, twelve years, up to the time of his death; Mrs. Fitzpatrick came to this county in 1867. They were married in 1846 and had eleven children, five of whom are living, as follows: Thomas, Mary, Julia, Johnnie and Theresa. Mrs. F. and her entire family are members of the Catholic Church; during his life, Mr. F. was a Democrat, and the oldest son is now in the same line of politics.

HAYES

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     PATRICK HAYES is engaged in general farming and stock-raising on his large and well equipped farm on section 7, Cass Township, Since 1856 he has been numbered among the agriculturists of Jones County, though for many years prior to that he was extensively engaged in railroad contracting in this state, as well as in other states in the west.
The birth of Patrick Hayes occurred in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1845, his parents being Patrick and Johannah (Kain) Hayes, who were also natives of the Emerald Isle. The father died when his son and namesake was quite young, and in 1851 the mother came with her family to America.  They arrived in New York City, where they lived for some years, and finally in 1855 came to Iowa, making a settlement in Linn County. In the schools of the neighborhood young Hayes received his education and engaged in farm work until twenty-four years of age. At that time he became an employe of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad and took contracts for its construction. He was also in the same business in Iowa and Nebraska for the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad.  Later he received and executed contracts for construction on the Midland Railroad, and in these enterprises met with a good degree of success. Prior to this he spent three years on the Pacific Coast. His natural tastes, however, were in the direction of agriculture, and in 1871 he returned to the business, embarking in farming on his own account in Cass Township, where he has successfully conducted a farm ever since. His place of one hundred and eighty acres is nearly all under cultivation, and abundant harvests are gathered there from each year. The owner raises a good grade of cattle and  hogs and is practical and progressive in his methods and in the management of his affairs.
     In political matters Mr. Hayes is a Democrat and has always taken a leading part in public improvements and educational work. In religion he is a Catholic, and with his wife and family is a regular attendant at the services of his church. Among his friends and neighbors he is highly esteemed on account of his industrious life and habits.
         In 1871 occurred the marriage of Mr. Hayes and Miss Nancy Kairn, the daughter of Michael Kairn. Mr. and Mrs. Hayes have had a family of four sons and three daughters, who in order of birth are as follows: Ellen, Susan, William, John, Frank, Cecelia and Leo. Their parents are giving them the benefit of a good education whereby to meet the duties and battles of life and are training them to become useful citizens.

~Submitted by Becky Teubner

KENNEDY

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     MICHAEL KENNEDY.    For about forty years the subject of this sketch has been intimately connected with the growth and development of Clayton County, as he settled on a farm in Volga Township in the early days of its history, the land being then but little broken and there being few settlements within its limits. For ten years he engaged in improving and
cultivating his farm, making it one of the valuable ones of the township; he never spared his energy in any direction when he believed it might be directed to the advantage of his place. In 1866 he retired to some extent from active cares, removing his family to Elkader, where he resided for three years.
     A native of Ireland, Mr. Kennedy was born in County Tipperary September 26, 1816, being a son of Michael and Jude (Stapleton) Kennedy, also natives of the Emerald Isle. In the schools of his native land he acquired a good general education and there continued to make his home for many years after reaching his majority. In 1844 he carried into effect a resolution which had been growing within him for some time to seek his fortune in the United
States, and therefore he set forth in one of the slow sailing-vessels of that period and in due course of time arrived in New York City. Going to Syracuse, N. Y., he made that city his place of abode for a period of ten years, when in 1854 he departed for the west and for one year was a resident of Dubuque, this state, after which, as previously stated, he came to this county.
     About 1860 Mr. Kennedy went to Highland Township and there conducted a farm until 1894, when he once more retired to make his home in Elkader. His hard-earned money, which he has acquired through years of honest and industrious effort, he has invested mainly in real estate. He has never regretted the fact that he decided to cast in his lot with the inhabitants of this favored region for his efforts have been blessed with success far beyond his expectations, and he has laid up ample means whereby to spend in comfort his declining years.
     In 1848, while a resident of Syracuse, N. Y., Mr. Kennedy married Miss Catherine Burke, who was called from this life in the spring of 1855, leaving five children to mourn her loss. In the latter part of 1855 our subject was united in marriage with Mrs. Mary Mooney, who was a faithful and devoted helpmate and companion to her husband for about thirty-five
years. She departed this life on the 7th of August, 1891, leaving many loving friends, who deeply lamented her loss. In politics Mr. Kennedy is independent, preferring not to be bound by party ties but to vote for the man whom he considers best qualified in every way to carry out the wishes of the people.

~Submitted by Becky Teubner

O'BRIEN

Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamilton Counties, Iowa. Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1888.

     J.M. O'Brien, of Vincent, is prominent among the pioneers of Newark Township. He has been a resident of Webster County since the spring of 1868, first locating on river land in Webster Township, and the title being in dispute he decided to move and in the fall of 1872 bought eighty acres of land in Newark Township, on section 9, and located on it in the spring of 1878. Mr. O'Brien is a native of Ireland, born in Tipperary County, September 10, 1831. His father, James O'Brien, was a merchant, and J.M. received good educational advantages. His father died in 1844, and in 1846 his  mother came to America, bringing with her our subject and a daughter who has since died. The first summer was spent in Dutchess County ,New York, and in the fall they moved to Bergen County, New Jersey, where our subject lived until 1855, when he came west and settled in Kenosha County ,Wisconsin, going thence to Wood County in 1857, where he lived until his removal to Webster County. February 14, 1865, he enlisted in Company B, Forty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry, and served until September, 1865. Since his settlement in Newark Township, he has been prominently identified with public affairs, and has filled a number of township offices. He was first township clerk and the first justice of the peace, and has since held the latter position, with the exception of one year. He owns a good farm of 400 acres all well improved. He has served as postmaster of Vincent postoffice since December 5, 1883. In the spring of 1882 he opened a little store a mile and a half south of his present place of business, which was the first store in the township, and has built up a good business, which is constantly increasing. He was married June 6, 1852, to Mary Powderly, a native of Meath County, Ireland. They have had eight children, six of whom are living- John H., of Idaho; Thomas; Christopher L; William F.; Elizabeth Ann, wife of James C. Halligan; and Mary A, wife of W.P. Slattery. In politics Mr. O'Brien is a Democrat.

CONNORS

Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamilton Counties, Iowa. Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1888.

     Patrick Connors, one of the pioneers of Webster County, resides on section 22, Johnson Township, on section 22, Johnson Township, where he has one of the best homes in the county. His farm of 600 acres lies on section 22 and 27, and is all under a good state of cultivation. He came to the county a poor man, but by industry and good management is now one of the prosperous citizens of the county. He was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in April, 1834, a son of Charles Connors. The father died in 1849, leaving a widow and eight children- two sons and six daughters, Patrick being the youngest son. In 1850 Patrick came to the United States and joined his brother James who had come several years before, in New York, and together they subsequently came west and settled first in Whiteside County, Illinois. In 1856 they came to Iowa and lived in Des Moines until the spring of 1857, when Patrick proceeded to Webster County looking for a location and entered land, a part of which is his present farm. James was married before coming to America, but had no children. He died in Clare, this county, in 1884, and his widow still lives on the homestead at the age of eighty years. Patrick Connors was married in August, 1858, at Des Moines, to Ellen Connors, a native of Ireland, born in 1835. Her father died when she was a child, leaving her mother with nine children. When she was seventeen years of age she came to America with a cousin, Simon Gallagher, who afterward enlisted in the war of the Rebellion and was killed. She lived in Broome County, New York, seven years and then removed to Des Moines, where she met her husband and was married. Although of the same name they are not related. In 1859 they settled on the land in Webster County and together shared the hardships of pioneer life and together made a home for their family. They are now reaping the reward of a life of industry and are enjoying the comforts and pleasures to be derived from their beautiful home and the consciousness of having lived a well spent life. Mr. and Mrs. Connors have had nine children, six of whom are living- Charles, John, Patrick, Bridget, Thomas, Mary. Three sons are deceased- Michael, James and Timothy. Their son Thomas is a merchant of Barnum, a member of the firm of Connors & Burke, and although a young man is fast becoming recognized as one of the prosperous business men of the place. Mr. Connors and his family are members of the Catholic church.

DWYER

Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamilton Counties, Iowa. Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1888.

     Martin Dwyer, section 18, Badger Township, is one of the prominent citizens of Webster County. He is a native of Ireland, born in Tipperary County, in March, 1833, a son of William Dwyer. His mother died in Liverpool, England, and in 1847 his father left the old country and with his family sailed for America. They located in Cayuga County, New York, where the father died in 1853. The family consisted of seven children, three sons and four daughters. Martin Dwyer remained in New York until 1857, when he came to Iowa, and settled in Wesbster County. He lived in Fort Dodge about a year and then settled in Pleasant Valley Township, buying a tract of timber land which he improved and made his home until the spring of 1872, when he sold his farm and bought the one where he now lives. While living in Pleasant Valley Township he was one of the school directors, and took an active part in assisting to organize the township into a separate municipality. He is a quiet, unassuming man who has never been an office seeker, preferring to devote his time to the cultivation of the soil, at which he has been successful. He owns a nice farm of eighty five acres all under cultivation. He had but limited educational advantages, but is a great reader, especially of the public press, and keeps himself well posted on all subjects of general interest. He is not in any sense a politician nor an adherent to any party. He began life a poor boy and the property he has acquired is due to his industry and honorable dealing. He was married August 7, 1854, to Miss Ellen Peters, also a native of County Tipperary, Ireland, who came to America in 1849. They have one daughter, Mary, who was married January 6, 1879, to Philip O'Connor. Mr. O'Connor died on board an Atchison, Texas & Santa Fe train near Garden City, Kansas, when on the way to California for his health. Mrs. O'Connor has had three children, two sons and one daughter, only one of whom is living, Martin, born January 4, 1880.

HENNESSY

Harlan, Edgar Rubey. A Narrative History of the People of Iowa. Vol IV. Chicago: American Historical Society,  1931

p. 145

     ALBERT V. HENNESSY, surgeon, Council Bluffs, has won many distinctions in his profession in his home city and throughout the Missouri River Valley.
     Doctor Hennessy was born in Iowa City, October 15, 1884, son of Richard and Ellen (Maher) Hennessy. Both parents were born in County Tipperary, Ireland, and were young people when they came to the United States. His mother died December 30, 1906. Richard Hennessy settled in Iowa City more than half a century ago and is now a resident of Chicago. At one time he carried mail in Iowa, was a carpenter, architect and builder. He is a Democrat in politics and a devout Catholic. There were ten children, seven of whom are living. Two brothers are associated in practice at Council Bluffs, Dr. Albert V. and Dr. Maurice C. The latter was born April 18, 1891.
     Albert V. Hennessy attended parochial and public schools and graduate from the Iowa City High School in 1902. He received his medical degree at the University of Iowa in 1906, and also had the benefit of six months of work as an interne in the Mercy Hospital at Council Bluffs. He entered private practice there June 13, 1906, and for a number of years his work has been entirely in surgery.
     Doctor Hennessy married in September, 1909, Miss Marie L. Cornelius, who was born in Freeport, Illinois, October 15, 1887. She attended school at Council Bluffs. Her father, Charles R. Cornelius, has been for many years a railway conductor with the Milwaukee Railway System. Doctor and Mrs. Hennessy have had three children: A.V., Jr., attending school; Charles Richard; and Cornelius, who died in 1913.
     Doctor Hennessy and family are members of St. Francis Catholic Church. He is a fourth degree Knight of Columbus, member of the B.P.O. Elks, Ancient Order of United Workmen, Fraternal Order of Eagles. During the World war he had the rank of major in the Medical Corps and was assigned duty as chief of surgical service at Department Hospital, Honolulu, and also served as surgeon member of the medical advisory board, Hawaiian draft. He was discharged December 31, 1918. His brother served overseas in the United States army as an officer in the medical department in the late war.
     Doctor Hennessy has been president of the Council Bluffs and Pottawattamie County Medical Societies, was second vice president of the Iowa State Medical Association in 1928, and is also a member of the American Medical Association, the Missouri Valley Medical Society and the Iowa Clinical Surgical Society. He is a member of the Phi Beta Pi medical fraternity. Doctor Hennessy is chairman of the executive committee of Mercy Hospital at Council Bluffs and his brother is a past president of the staff of the hospital. He is president of the McGee Investment Company, vice president of the Automobile Finance Company, is on the board of directors of the Bennett Building and the Broadway Theatre, and is a former member of the board of the Greater Council Bluffs Chamber of Commerce, and a past president of the Kiwanis Cub. He was formerly a director of the First National Bank of Council Bluffs. Doctor Hennessy was a member of the National Guard of Iowa for a number of years and is a former director of the Council Bluffs Country Club and councillor of the Iowa State Medical Society for the Ninth District.

HENNESSY

Harlan, Edgar Rubey. A Narrative History of the People of Iowa. Vol IV. Chicago: American Historical Society,  1931

p. 188

     MAURICE C. HENNESSY is a Council Bluffs surgeon, associated with his brother, Dr. Albert V. Hennessy, in practice, with offices in the Bennett Building, and they are also associated in several business activities.
    Doctor Hennessy was born at Iowa City, April 18, 1891. His parents, Richard and Ellen (Maher) Hennessy, were born in County Tipperary, Ireland, and came to the United States when young people. His father located at Iowa City more than half a century ago and in early life carried mail for several years, later became a carpenter, architect and builder. He is now a resident of Chicago, and his wife died December 30, 1906. Of their ten children seven are living.
    Maurice C. Hennessy, the youngest of the children, attended school at Iowa City and the University of Iowa there, and graduated in medicine at  the University of Illinois in 1913. He had one year of interne experience in the Mercy Hospital in Davenport and has been practicing with his brother at Council Bluffs since 1914. Like his brother his attention is directed to surgery.
    He married in 1919 Miss Ruth Banks, who was born in New York City, but was reared and educated in Earling and Council Bluffs, Iowa. She is a graduate nurse. They have four daughters: Mary Ellen, Ruth Kathleen, Patricia Irene and Natalie Ann.
    Doctor and Mrs. Hennessy are members of the Catholic Church. He is affiliated with Lodge No. 351, B.P.O.Elks, and the American Legion, of which he was a former officer. Both he and Mrs. Hennessy saw active service during the World war. She was a Red Cross army nurse at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, four months, and he entered the service in July, 1917, and went overseas as surgeon of the Ninth Aero Squadron and later was assigned for duty at Liverpool with the American Red Cross Military Hospital No 4. He was in England from November, 1917, until January, 1919, during which time he was a member of Disability Board Base Section 3, S.O.S., A.E.F. He received his honorable discharge on February 1, 1919.
    Doctor Hennessy is a member of the Pottawattamie County, Iowa State and American Medical Associations, and the Phi Beta Pi fraternity. He was president of the Mercy Hospital staff at Council Bluffs for two years. He is a director of the McGee Investment Company and of the Mercy Hospital staff and of the City Medical Society and president of the Pottawattamie County Medical Society.

HENNESSEY

Harlan, Edgar Rubey. A Narrative History of the People of Iowa. Vol IV. Chicago: American Historical Society,  1931

p. 338

     THOMAS J. HENNESSEY maintained his home at Missouri Valley, Harrison County, more than thirty years, and during that period he was continuously identified with the undertaking and funeral directing business, in which he was engaged in an independent way during the last twenty years of his life. In his character and his communal service he meant much to this city, and in his chosen sphere of business he maintained the utmost loyalty and highest ideals, while his ministration in the hours of sorrow were ever marked by abiding human sympathy and kindly consideration. The death of Mr. Hennessey occurred in February, 1927, and it is fitting that in this publication be entered a tribute to his memory.
    Mr. Hennessey was born in Clonmel, Ireland, November 21, 1867, and his death occurred in the Nicholas Senn Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska, February 3, 1927, he having gone from his home to the Nebraska metropolis to receive treatment at the hospital mentioned. The rudimentary education of Mr. Hennessey was acquired in the schools of his native land, and he was a lad of but fourteen years when he severed the home ties and set forth to see his fortune in the United States. From the port of his disembarking he forthwith proceeded to Des Moines, Iowa, where he learned the upholstering trade in the establishment of the Harbusche Furniture Company, with which he was thus connected a few years, his arrival in Des Moines having occurred in the year 1882. In that city likewise he advanced his education by attending night school and there also he learned the undertaking and embalming business under the direction of  a man named Nelson, who was connected with the Newlen furniture and undertaking establishment and who was one of the first licensed embalmers in Iowa. After his marriage Mr. Hennessy continued his residence in Des Moines until January, 1893, when he removed to Missouri Valley and found employment in the undertaking establishment of T. Foss. While thus engaged he ingratiated himself deeply in the confidence and esteem of this community, and this fact proved an asset when, in 1907, he here engaged independently in business as an undertaker and funeral director. For this new place of business he obtained the building that had up to that time been occupied by the T.M. Gilmore Grocery Company, at 507 East Erie Street, and this he fitted up consistently for the uses to which it was to be applied. Here later additions and improvements to the building were made, and here the business has continued since the death of Mr. Hennessey, who had brought his establishment up to the best standard in equipment and service. His gracious and devoted wife proved his faithful and efficient assistant in conducting the business, and in 1925 he admitted to partnership Darwin A. VanCleave, whereupon the present firm title of Hennessey & VanCleave was adopted. Mr. VanCleave is represented in the following sketch and has continued in the management of the business since the death of his beloved partner. Mr. Hennessey continued his active association with the business he had founded until his death set its seal upon his mortal lips, and it is pleasing to record that his nephew, Harold Hennessey, has been connected with the business since 1927 and is ultimately to be admitted to the firm as the virtual successor of his uncle, whose widow still retains the latter's interest in the firm, though she now maintains her home in Sioux City. The religious faith of Mr. Hennessey was that of the Catholic Church, of which he was an earnest communicant, as is also his widow and he was affiliated with the Knights of Columbus as a fourth-degree knight, and also with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights and Ladies of Security, the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of the Macabees.
     On the 27th of November, 1888, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hennessey to Miss Nellie E. Schultze, of Chariton, Lucas County, and after his death she removed to Sioux City, which likewise is the home of their only child, Alonzo J.
    Mr. Hennessey was true and faithful in all the relations of life and his name shall long be held in gracious memory by the people of the city in which he maintained his home many years- until the time of his death.
    

FINN

A Memorial and Biographical record of Iowa. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1896

     JOHN FINN, hardware dealer and Postmaster at Decorah, Iowa, was born March 7, 1836, in the parish of Ballywilham, county of Tipperary, Ireland, his parents being Patrick and Bridget (Minogue) Finn.
     The Finns are one of the oldest Irish families, and from time immemorial the paternal ancestors of our subject had tilled the soil of their native land. On the mother's side of the house, the Minnogues had turned their attention to other lines of industry than farming, and considerable wealth had been accumulated by the family.
     John Ragen, a cousin of our subject, had made his home at Galena, Illinois, and through his accounts of the New World Patrick Finn made up his mind to locate therein. Accordingly he sailed from Ireland the latter part of 1847, being accompanied by his wife and four children. He was doomed, however, never to see the promised land for he sickened with ship fever and died, after being on the ocean eight weeks. The widow with her four small children, of whom our subject was the oldest, landed at New Orleans in February, 1848, and after a long and tedious voyage of sixteen weeks. The family came on to Galena, where they found that Mr. Ragen had a home prepared for them in the shape of a rented farm; but, the head of the household being dead, this plan had to be abandoned. The widow now located in Galena with the idea of keeping her little family together, and thus prevent the severing of home ties. She passed the remainder of her days there. Of her children, two of them live in Decorah. Mary, the only girl, married William Burge, a boot and shoe dealer, of Galena, Illinois; later they moved to Colorado and there she died, leaving one child, John Burge. Patrick, the youngest child, located in Decorah and died at the age of thirty-five years.
     Our subject, being the oldest child, was placed in the position of father to the family. He was apprenticed to Nicholas Dowling, a tinner at Galena, and there spent five years in acquiring his trade. In the fall of 1853 he went up the river to St. Paul and was there employed at his trade. In June, 1854, he returned to Galena on a visit and from there proceeded to Lancaster, Wisconsin, where he worked that summer. He determined to move into the Northwest again, and accordingly went to St. Anthony (Minneapolis), where he worked for the next few months. At this time the Northwest had no railroad facilities, and when the river was frozen over, St. Anthony and St. Paul were practically cut off from the rest of the world till it opened again in the spring. This was a condition of affairs that did not please Mr. Finn, and when Charles Schmitt, now of Spillville, Iowa, told him he thought he could get a job of Logan & Paul, hardware men at Decorah, Iowa, our subject determined to make the effort. He came down the river to Lansing, walked across country to Decorah and secured the job. He remained with this firm one year, and then worked for M.A. Bradish for a time.
     Mr. Finn came to Decorah in October, 1855. When he reached the town he had about $700 in cash, but his marriage a few months later used up about all his money. When he began business for himself in the spring of 1858, his capital consisted of a wagon, which was bought on time from John Ammon, and which he sold to a Mr. White for a kit of tinner's tools. This wagon was valued at $90, and as Mr. White was just starting on an overland trip to California, it was more useful to him than the tools; and hence the trade.
     Mr. Finn's success in life began with his independent start in business, for he was practically successful from the beginning. In 1863 his brother became a partner, but soon after went to the war. R.F. Gibson was then a partner for a year. When his brother returned from the war he again joined in the business, and thus the firm of Finn Brothers continued till 1879. In March, 1881, Daniel Noble was taken as a partner, and the firm name read "Finn & Noble," and thus continued till January 1, 1891, since which time Mr. Finn has conducted the business alone. The firm of Finn Brothers built the Strand & Duncan building in 1866. Mr. Finn moved into his present quarters in 1886, and in April, 1895, purchased the building from R.F. Allison.
     Our subject was married October 10, 1856, at Decorah, Iowa, to Miss Elizabeth Quinn, daughter of Patrick and Elizabeth Quinn. She as born in the parish of Craughan, county of Kings, Ireland, March 18, 1840, but brought to America in childhood. Their children are: Mary Elizabeth, born January 1, 1858, died December 6, 1891; Margaret, born May 30, 1859; Grace, October 9, 1861; John Patrick, May 8, 1863; Peter Emmett, born March 2, 1865, died July 10, 1875; Marcella, born in 1866, died in infancy; Annie, born July 20, 1869; and Patrick, May 3, 1875. Of the above children, five of the daughters have taken the regular course at the Prairie du Chien school, one of the best institutions of learning in this part of the country, and the father has left no stone unturned to complete their education. Mrs. Finn died February 7, 1877. During her later years she was a sufferer from pulmonary troubles, and the husband did everything that medical science could suggest to restore the lost health of his wife. As a last resort he took her to Aiken, South Carolina, where they spent the winter, but all to no avail. She died leaving a grief-stricken husband and a group of sorrowful children to mourn her loss, for she was a faithful wife and a fond and loving mother.
     Mr. Finn was originally a Republican in politics, casting his first vote for Fremont. He was converted to Democracy, however, under the powerful elegance of the late Stephen A. Douglas when that gentleman spoke at Galena as a participant in the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates. Our subject has been faithful to, and a hard worker in, the party from that time to the present. In 1879 he was the candidate for his party for the Legislature and ran over 300 ahead of his ticket, but was defeated by the overwhelming Republican majority. He was appointed Postmaster of Decorah by President Cleveland June 28, 1885, and the appointment was confirmed by the Senate July 26, 1886. He took charge of the office July 4, 1885, and held it for five years and two months. He received his present appointment as Postmaster from President Cleveland October 30, 1894, took charge of the office November 12, following, and was confirmed by the Senate January 10, 1895. Mr. Finn was elected as a member of the City School Board, and assumed his duties therein March 13, 1865. He served in that capacity for nine consecutive years, and during that time, in 1866-67, the present fine public school building was erected, at a cost of $20,000. He was a member of the Town Council at the time when Decorah became a city, and was instrumental in bringing about that event. He served as chairman of the Democratic county central committee from 1865 to 1885. He was also a member of the old Third Congressional Committee, serving from 1872 to 1885, with the exception of an intermission of one year.
     Probably no man in the county has done as much to keep the Democratic party organized in northeastern Iowa as has our subject. He has been in touch with the national leaders of the party; has been a hard worker, and his upright and successful business career has commanded the respect of his followers.

BYRNES

 History of Butler and Bremer Counties, Iowa 1883

     Patrick Byrnes - section boss - is a native of County Tipperary, Ireland, and was born in 1831. In 1850 he left his native country for the purpose of finding a new home and building up his fortune on American soil. He first located in Kane county, Illinois, where he was employed on a farm. Two years later he began railroading, and for the last thirty years, has been in charge of a corps of railroad hands. His first experience was on the Beloit and Madison branch, thence to the Racine and Mississippi railroad, where he continued until 1869. His marriage with Miss Sarah McClossen, a daughter of John McClossen, of Elkhorn, Wisconsin, occurred in 1859. Eight children bless this marriage - Michael, John, Thomas, Ellen, Maggie, Joseph, Willie, and Sadie. Mr. Byrnes owns a fine residence in Waverly. The family are members of the Catholic Church.

CLEARY

 History of Butler and Bremer Counties, Iowa 1883

     Timothy Cleary, a native of Tipperary, Ireland, was born in 1822. In May, 1851, he came to America, and upon his arrival worked for one year in the State of New York, and them moved to Illinois, where he remained until the spring of 1855, when he came to Bremer county, Iowa, and made a claim in Douglas township. He then worked in Minnesota and Illinois for the three following years, and in the fall of 1858, settled on his claim. His farm contains 490 acres on section 24. He was married in White Hall, New York, in 1853, to Miss Mary McCormick, also a native of Ireland. They have had eleven children, nine of whom are now living - Mary A., Martin, Thomas (deceased), Katie, Sarah J., John, Emma, Tim, George and Thomas (twins), Jessie (deceased.)

ANGLUM

AYRSHIRE, IOWA CENTENNIAL
Ayrshire, Palo Alto, Iowa
1882-1982
p. 129-130


THE ANGLUMS
Submitted by Florence Degnan and Maurine Sweeney.

                William Anglum and his bride left Tipperary, Ireland, in the early eighteen hundreds and landed in Stratford, Ontario, Canada. Four children were born to them: William Jr., Mrs. Mary Peyton, Mrs. Margaret Goodkind of Montana and Mrs. Henry Bradshaw of Nevada.
                William Sr. was born in Statford in 1841, and married Rachel Kirby, a native of Ireland, in 1861. He graduated from high school at the age of twenty, and taught school for many years. Some time later they came to the United States, making their home in Chicago. Later they came to Neola, Iowa. They came to Palo Alto County in 1893. His good wife passed to her eternal reward in 1911. Grandpa, as he was called, died in 1917. He had taken care of his grandchildren while he was ill. He is buried in Calvary Cemetery at Ayrshire.
                William Jr. was the father of eight children: Mary, who died in childbirth and the son was raised by his grandparents; Thomas, who died in Canada; Rachel, Mrs. Wilkson, who is buried in Montana; John, who married Catherine Bowen; James married Ann Dailey; Elizabeth, who married Patrick Bowen; Sarah and Frank Russel of Whittemore; and Winifred, who was married to Tom Smith.
                Tom Anglum decided to migrate and homestead in Canada, so his sister and her husband, Pat Brown, planned to go with him. Since the family was soon separated, they had a photo made of the group. They all went to Emmetsburg (in their surreys with the fringe on top) where they had the photo taken. It is sad to say, but they never met again. They lived where the Wilbur Heiman family now live, north of Ayrshire.
                William James Anglum was born at Neola, Iowa. His wife, Ann Dailey, was born in Ft. Dodge, Iowa, on December 27, 1875.
                James and Ann were married in Sacred Heart Church on Feb. 6, 1893. Ten children were born to them: Edward, died in infancy; William, died at the age of two; Mary was seven when she was burned to death in a tragic fire in 1904. This fire is the fire that destroyed half of the business district of Ayrshire. She and some little friends were on their way home from school, and as children will, were picking articles such as pretty buttons out of the ashes lift from the fire of the night before. Her clothing caught fire, apparently from a small spark that was in the debris. A man who was passing by threw his coat about her and distinguished the flame. She was taken to Dr. Duhigg's office and later Dr. O'Brien was called, but she was dead when he arrived in Ayrshire. At that time they were living in the house that was located where Steve Peterson's log house now is. Rachel married Harry Degnan, and died in 1972. Forence married Ralph Degnan, and lives southeast of Ayrshire. Harry (Posey) died in 1973. John M., passed away at the age of thirty-three in 1938. Matthew and Margaret
(twins), Margaret, died at birth and Matthew in 1930, Maurine (Toots) married Bert Sweeney. She lies in Ayrshire and is Postmistress of the local Post Office.
                The Anglums came from Neola, Iowa, in 1892. Later James and John operated a met market in Ayrshire for several years. Later Jim, with his family, moved to Mallard where he ran a meat market. Mrs. Anglum died while they lived there, in 1911. Jim continued in the meat market until he became ill in 1917, when they returned to Ayrshire. He passed away in 1921.