THE IRISH IN IOWA

Biographies of Those Who Came From Ireland

    ROCHE

History of Dubuque County, Iowa; Weston A. Goodspeed, ed. by F. T. Oldt and P. J. Quigley; Chicago: Goodspeed Hist. Assoc. 1911

     Michael Roche, now living a retired life in the city of Dubuque, is a native of the Emerald Isle, his birth occurring in the year 1840, and a son of Thomas and Ellen (Callahan) Roche. Thomas Roche was born in Ireland in 1805, and when forty-four years of age crossed the Atlantic Ocean to America, accompanied by his family, and settled on a tract of 120 acres in Jefferson township, Dubuque county, Iowa. Here he resided many years and in 1897 died, a man respected by all who knew him. His wife passed away in 1877, and both are buried near the old homestead. The early life of Michael Roche in this country was spent much after the manner of other country boys of those days- assisting his father on the home farm and in attending the public schools, then little more than log cabins. When the elder Roche's eyesight began to wane, the work and responsibility of the farm fell to the lot of Michael, but when the father was badly hurt from a fall, he relinquished the management of the estate to his younger brothers, John and Joseph. In 1902 he disposed of the old home place and bought a smaller farm on Asbury Road, near West Dubuque, but four years later, having accumulated considerable means, retired from the active duties of life and removed into the city of Dubuque, where he has since resided. In 1865 Mr. Roche decided to go West and visit the mountains of Montana. He accordingly went to Sioux City, Iowa, and was employed as deck hand on a steamboat at $60 per month. The water in the upper river was so low that they succeeded in getting but a few miles above Fort Ripley. The commanding officer of the fort advised them not to go any farther, as the Indians were becoming very troublesome, and to do so would be dangerous. Nothing daunted, however, they continued their journey, and about two weeks later became stranded on a sandbar some distance from the fort. The pilot and five men went out in a small boat to locate the channel, entirely unarmed, and after locating same decided to go ashore for a time. While there they were attacked from ambush by the "redskins," and being unarmed, could do nothing but try their best to escape. Two men succeeded in making their way to the boat, but were killed and the boat cast adrift, to be later picked up by the soldiers at Fort Ripley. One man dove in the water and made his way to the sandbar, where he was shot while rolling over in the water, sinking and disappearing forever. One large Irishman put up a desperate struggle, but was captured alive and never heard of again, probably perishing at the stake. Another, a German, was shot through the shoulder with an arrow, but managed to hide under the bank until the steamer came down and rescued him. The other man of the party divested himself of all save underclothing and swam the river unmolested by the Indians, who took him to be one of themselves because of the red color of his attire. When the boat returned to Sioux City in the fall, the captain offered Mr. Roche and increase of wages of $20 a month, but he declined, claiming that the desire for adventure in him had been appeased. He then returned to his old home in Dubuque county, where he has always been regarded as an honorable man and a useful and progressive citizen. he was married to Catherine Burke, February 8, 1866. Eight children have been born to this union, as follows: William T., Michael, James (deceased), May, Ella, John Francis, Joseph E., Catherine E. and Clara.

WHALEN

Past and Present in Allamakee County, by Ellery M. Hancock. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1913.

Among the most profitable farms located in Allamakee county is that of Patrick Whalen, comprising four hundred and forty-one acres on section 26, French Creek township. He is one of the early pioneers of this section, where he was brought by his mother in 1858. A native of New York, he was born in Oneida county on April 13, 1851, and is a son of Thomas and Nora (Carney) Whalen, natives of Ireland, in which county they were married. The father with his family emigrated to America and established a home in Oneida county, New York, but lived but a short time after coming to this country, passing away when his son Patrick was but an infant. In 1858 his widow and her children came to Allamakee county and here she purchased forty acres of unimproved land on section 35 in French Creek township. Courageously taking up her duties of providing for the family, she undertook the cultivation of her farm and there her children grew to maturity. The mother ever continued to make her home on that property, where she passed away several years ago. Of her six children two are now living: Patrick, of this review; and Peter, who makes his home in Decorah, Iowa. Those deceased are: Elizabeth, who became the wife of John Lauchlin, of French Creek township; William, who enlisted from Oneida county, New York, for service in the Civil war and was killed during that conflict; Thomas, who died on the old homestead in 1888; and James, who passed away at the age of twenty-one in this county.
Patrick Whalen was the youngest of these six children. He was educated in the district schools and early began to take up life's duties by assisting in the work of the farm and driving teams in order to break the land. At the age of twenty-six he had acquired the means to purchase one hundred and sixty acres, slightly improved, and by close application and following modern and up-to-date methods has succeeded in gaining such gratifying results that he was enabled to extend the boundaries of his farm from time to time until it now includes four hundred and forty-one acres of fertile land. He has greatly improved his property and has erected thereon suitable and substantial barns, outbuildings and sheds and his residence is comfortable and commodious. The latest farm machinery and implements can be found upon his property and he is ever ready to take up new methods which promise greater yields from his acres.
In 1876 Mr. Whalen was united in marriage to Miss Julia Reagan, a native of Center township, Allamakee county, and a daughter of Daniel Reagan, one of the earliest pioneers of this section. Mr and Mrs Whalen have nine children, all of whom are living: Nora, the wife of P.J. McCauley, of French Creek township; Daniel J., a plumber of La Crosse, Wisconsin; James, who is studying for the priesthood; and William T., Mary, Peter, Charles, Frank and Angela, at home.
Mr. Whalen has always supported the democratic party and is well informed upon all matters of a public or political nature. For three terms he served efficiently as township trustee and while in the office of school director gave evidence of his interest in the cause of education. He and his family are devout communicants of the Catholic church, in the work of which they take and active and helpful interest. The career of Mr. Whalen is proof of the fact that success is but ambition's answer and what he has attained is but the natural outcome of industry and energy dominated by a progressive spirit. He is highly respected and esteemed for what he has attained, and the confidence and good-will which he receives from his friends and neighbors are highly merited.

KELLEY

Past and Present in Allamakee County, by Ellery M. Hancock. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1913.

Farming and stock-raising interests of Allamakee county find a progressive and worthy representative in D.J. Kelley, who owns a fine property of one hundred and sixty-five acres in Iowa township. He is one of Allamakee county's native sons, his birth having occurred in 1869. His parents were Patrick and Bridget Kelley, natives of Ireland, who came at different times to the United States, both settling in New York city, where their marriage occurred. Immediately afterward they came west to Iowa and in Iowa township, Allamakee county, rented land, upon which they resided for a time, later purchasing a farm six miles southwest of New Albin, which the father continued to develop and improve until his death, which occurred in 1910, becoming during that time one of the leading and representative agriculturists of this section of the state. His wife survives him and resides upon the homestead, being now eighty years of age. To their union were born five children, four of whom still survive: D.J. of this review; John F., of New Albin; Annie, who makes her home with her mother; and Edward, who also lives upon the homestead.
D.J. Kelley grew to manhood upon his father's farm in Iowa township, acquiring his early education in the district schools and later attending a business college at Waukon. At the age of twenty-five he began his independent career, turning his attention to the occupation to which he had been reared, renting land near the old homestead and continuing to develop and improve it for a number of years. In 1908 he bought eighty acres in the same vicinity and to this he has since added, being now the owner of one hundred and sixty-five acres, which he has brought to a well improved and excellent condition. In connection with the tilling of the soil he engages extensively in raising and breeding high-grade stock and this forms one of the most important sources of his income. He is also a stockholder in the New Albin Creamery, a director and stockholder in the Farmers Telephone Company and a secretary of the New Albin & Irish Hollow Telephone Company and is well known in business circles of the city as a resourceful, able, and progressive business man, who always carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes.
In 1899 Mr .Kelley was united in marriage to Miss Ella Morgan, a daughter of Lawrence Morgan, who passed away, leaving a widow, who resides in New Albin, and six children, as follows: Mary, the wife of Mathew Flynn, of Dorchester, Iowa; Ella, the wife of the subject of this review; Maggie, who married Michael Donovan, of New Albin; Theresa, now Mrs. William Beckwell, of the same city; Alice, a sister in St. Francis Convent; and Francis, who makes his home near New Albin. Mr. and Mrs. Kelley are devout members of the Roman Catholic church and Mr. Kelley is affiliated with the Catholic Order of Forresters. Always a staunch supporter of democratic policies and principles, he has done a great deal to promote his party's cause in Allamakee county and in 1912 was elected township assessor, a capacity in which he is still serving. He is a believer in pure and clean politics and never withholds his support from any enterprise which he believes will advance the moral or material welfare of his city or county.

TINGLEY

History of Dubuque County, Iowa; Weston A. Goodspeed, ed. by F. T. Oldt and P. J. Quigley; Chicago: Goodspeed Hist. Assoc. 1911

Patrick Tingley died August 10, 1865. He was a native of Ireland, born in 1799. He came to America in 1818 and married Catherine Rooney in St. Louis in 1824. He was one of the first settlers of Dubuque, arriving in August, 1833, and was a member of the Wisconsin territorial legislature. He was justice of the peace in 1835, alderman, mayor, representative in 1836, and senator and receiver of public moneys. He first lived in a tent at Main and First streets; the same year his log house on Bluff street was built, and here the first Catholic services in Dubuque were held.

McCABE

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

McCabe, Patrick, an early pioneer that in 1856 located on sec. 24, was a native of Ireland. He improved and enlarged his pre-emption to 160 acres. He occupied it until his death and it is still in the possession of his wife (Dempsey) and family. He was an honest and upright man, and enjoyed the confidence of his fellow-citizens. He was one of the first trustees of the township, and in 1862, becoming a member of the second board, served four years as a county supervisor.
His family consisted of seven children:
Annie married John Condon, a farmer, who owns a large farm in Webster county, and has raised a large family.
Kate is in a Sisters' school at Dubuque.
Alice married Thomas Fitz, and lives on a farm in Jackson township.
Peter, owner of 160 acres, lives with his mother at the old home.
Margaret married Michael Fitz and located on a farm in Humboldt county, where she died about 1890.
James J. married a daughter of Thomas Brennan, owns a farm of 80 acres on sec. 24 and has three children.
Elizabeth married John Condon and lives in Wisconsin.

O'BOYLE

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

O'Boyle, Michael (b. 1826; d. 1897) resident of section 20, Lizard township, from 1876 to 1890, was a native of Ireland, the son of John and Mary O'Boyle. He came to America in 1851, and in 1856 at Pottsville, Pa., married Mary Thompson. Later he located at Shenandoah, Pa. and in 1876 in Pocahontas county. He was a successful farmer and transformed the wild prairie on which he located into a beautiful home. In 1890 he moved to Clare where he died in 1897. He was an ardent democrat and a member of the Catholic church.
His family consisted of four children:
Thomas married Alice Dalton and has been for many years the postmaster at Clare.
Kate married John Conlee, a merchant, and lives at Manson.
Mary married John Collins, a merchant, and lives at Gilmore City.
Patrick died in 1881.

COLLINS

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

Collins, Michael (b. 1821; d. 1868), member of the first board of county supervisors in 1861, became the wealthiest and in some respects the most prominent of the Lizard pioneers. His axe was one of the first to ring in the woods along the Lizard and his stalwart form was among the first to startle the Indian in Pocahontas county. He was a generous, honorable man whom to know was to become his friend. He participated in the organization of Lizard township, and also of Pocahontas county. He served as the first clerk of Lizard township, took an intelligent and active part in the management of its affairs and made a good success of his own business. He served three years in 1862-64 as county treasurer and recorder and the next year as county treasurer. Walter Ford, his friend and neighbor more than forty years, said of him: "In those early days people in search of homes were directed to Collins' grove where they found Michael Collins always willing to assist them and welcome them under his roof. He took them over the prairies in his wagon and showed them the choicest homesteads. He was often called from his work several times a day, when Lizard Creek was high, to ferry travelers across it in his dugout which was hewn from a basswood tree. His services were always gratuitous."
When he left Pittsburg, Pa., for Iowa in 1855 he was accompanied by his younger brother, Hugh (single) and James Hickey. Soon afterward he was followed by his elder brother, Patrick and their cousin, Roger Collins. Michael lived on the farm until 1877. He then moved to Manson and in 1891 to Clare, where he died in 1898.
His family consisted of three sons, Patrick and James, who died young in Ireland, Bridget, who cared for him after his retirement from the farm and Michael T.
Catherine Kinnerk, daughter of the wife of Michael Collins, Sr., came with her to the Lizard settlement in 1855. She married Thomas J. Calligan of Webster county and raised a family of two sons and four daughters. She now lives on her farm south of Clare, her husband having died in 1882.

[Note: Michael may have been from Co. Derry as his son, Michael T was born at Dunbeg.]

COLLINS

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

Collins, Patrick (b. 1819, d. 1897), elder brother of Michael, after his marriage to Nora Green in Ireland in 1853, came to Pennsylvania and remained four years. In the fall of 1857, with wife and three children he located on the se1/4 sec 12, Lizard township, and the next year secured the ne1/4 sec. 24. After a residence of five years in this county he sold his farms to his brothers, Michael and Hugh Collins, and moved to Webster County, where he died at 78 in 1897.

COLLINS

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

Collins, Hugh (b. Ireland 1833; d. 1889), younger brother of Michael came to America in his youth and located at Pittsburg, Pa. In 1854 he came to Iowa and to the Lizard settlement the next year in company with James Hickey. They were the first two settlers in the Lizard settlement, Hickey locating on the se1/4 sec. 13, Lizard township and Collins on the sw1/4 sec. 18, opposite in Jackson township. In 1871 he bought the farm of his cousin, Roger Collins, containing the Collins grove of natural timber on sec. 24, and it is now owned by his son, Michael J. Collins, of Clare.

COLLINS

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

Collins, Roger, cousin of Michael Sr., coming to America at 32, lived in New York and Ohio till 1856 when he located on a preemption on the ne1/4 sec. 23, 160 acres, Lizard township. Later he also secured the n1/4 nw1/4 sec. 24. In 1871, after a residence of 14 years he moved to a farm near Fort Dodge and later to that town where he died at 78 in 1900. His family consisted of one son, who died about 1888, and six daughters, all of whom are married, namely, Mrs. M. English, Mrs. Matthias Hanrahan of Clare, Mrs. Frank Hogan, Mrs. Frank McNamara of Fort Dodge, Mrs. Robert McNamara of Belmond and Mrs. Thomas F. McCartan of Pocahontas.

BUCKLEY

History of Dubuque County, Iowa; Weston A. Goodspeed, ed. by F. T. Oldt and P. J. Quigley; Chicago: Goodspeed Hist. Assoc. 1911

Henry L. Buckley, well known resident of Dubuque and a justice of the peace, was born in East Dubuque January 2, 1875, and is a son of John and Catherine (McManus) Buckley. The father was a native of Ireland and came to America and Dubuque, Iowa, at an early date. For a period of forty-three years he was an employe of the Illinois Central Railway Company, being at the time of his death station master at Dubuque. He died in 1898 at the age of sixty-six years, but his widow still survives him and resides in Dubuque. She came from Ireland to America with her parents when young and has always resided in Dubuque county. Michael McManus, her brother, was killed by accident during a sham battle, his head being severed from his body by a gun thought to be unloaded. Until 1893 Henry L. Buckley attended the public school of his native city, and upon his parents removal to Dubuque finished his education in the third ward school. He then entered the employ of the Illinois Central railroad as messenger boy and upon his resignation in 1902 was timekeeper. A few years later Mr. Buckley was appointed deputy county clerk, serving as such until his election in 1908 to the office of justice of the peace. In politics he is a Democrat and socially a member of the Woodmen of the World, Modern Woodmen of America and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. At St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, Dubuque, December 30, 1903, he was united in marriage with Miss Clara M. Heeb, daughter of Louis and Catherine Heeb, who have been residents of Dubuque county for the last thirty years. Mr. Buckley is one of Dubuque's public spirited citizens and is highly respected by all who know him.

KEARNEY

History of Dubuque County, Iowa; Weston A. Goodspeed, ed. by F. T. Oldt and P. J. Quigley; Chicago: Goodspeed Hist. Assoc. 1911

Frank J. Kearney, manager of the Western Union Telegraph office in Dubuque, was born in this city November 28, 1870, a son of the old pioneers, Michael M. and Mary (Griffin) Kearney. Michael M. Kearney was born in New York state in 1838 and was of Irish descent, his parents coming to America at an early date. Early in life he attended the public schools and learned the carpenter trade, and in 1859 went to Montreal, Canada, where he remained two years. He then returned to Waddington, New York, and when the government was plunged into war, and all patriotic men were urged to come forward to maintain the union of the states, the stirring call met with an answer from Mr. Kearney who enlisted with the Eighty-third New York Volunteers, which command was later consolidated with the Ninety-seventh, and he served throughout that entire struggle as a member of the Army of the Potomac. He was wounded five times, twice seriously. At the battle of the Wilderness he lost an eye and during another engagement was struck in the leg by a bullet which splintered the bone and rendered him somewhat crippled in after life. In 1865 he was honorably discharged, and came to Dubuque, his people having removed to this city during the war. Here he worked at his trade of carpenter, and in 1868 was married to Miss Mary Griffin, a native of Ireland. To them were born: Frank J.; Katherine (Mrs. D.U. Murphy); May (Sister Mary Amabalis of the Sisters of Charity, B.U.M.); Agnes; and Joseph (deceased). Frank J. Kearney, the oldest of the children and the immediate subject of this memoir, received his education in the local parochial schools and under private tutors. He also attended Bayless Business College and learned telegraphy, at which he has been engaged ever since. He is at present manager of the Western Union office in Dubuque. In 1902 he was married to Miss Effie Adams, who is descended from Rev. Robert Cushman, of Colonial fame, and to them Francis A. and Mary Adella have been born. It was Robert Cushman who, with Governor Carver, chartered the Mayflower, which brought the first Pilgrims to America, in December, 1620. He himself came in 1621, and after having been here a few weeks, preached a sermon on "Sin and the Danger of Self-Love." It is the oldest sermon extant, delivered in America. Mr. Kearney is a member of the Knights of Columbus, is a Roman Catholic in religious views, and one of the progressive and public-spirited men of the county.

GARVEY

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

Garvey John, (b. May 5, 1848) is a native of Ireland. In 1864 he came alone to America and located in New York state, and in 1867 in Allamakee county, Iowa, where in 1873 he married Sophia Williamson. In the spring of 1873 he located on his present farm on the NE1/4 Sec. 21, which he has finely improved and increased to 240 acres.
His family consists of five children: James, a well-digger, Jane and Eliza, teachers and Henry and Albert.

BEATTEY

The History of Jackson County, Iowa...Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1879.

William Beattey, farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Bellevue; born in the North of Ireland in 1835; came to America in 1852; his father lives in the old country; his mother is dead; came to Jackson Co. in 1858; lived in Bellevue six years and while there worked at his trade, which is that of plasterer; came to his present home in 1864, where he has since resided; has a fine farm, well watered, and some timber upon it. Has been Assessor, School Director and Trustee of his town. His wife's maiden name was Susan Legross, a native of France; they were married in 1856, in this county; have had seven children, six of whom are now living, named as follows: John Clinton, Cora, Eugene, Sadie, Ionia and Thomas; the one dead was named George William; was 18 years old when he was killed in the following manner, in September, 1878: He jumped on a horse that was harnessed, and put his foot into the lines, that were tied up; the horse threw him, and he was dragged a considerable distance over a rough piece of ground, his foot hanging in the lines, and was badly torn and instantly killed. Mr. Beattey also met with a severe loss in the death of his wife; she died in Dec., 1877. Mr. Beattey was raised an Episcopalian; he owns 160 acres, about 100 under cultivation.

CRAWFORD

The History of Jackson County, Iowa...Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1879.

William Crawford, farmer, Sec. 30; P.O. Miles; was born in Ireland in 1824; he came to this country in June, 1846; he lived for several years in Livingston Co., N.Y., engaged as a farm hand; he came to Jackson Co. In March 1855; in the fall of that year he went to Minnesota; returned to Jackson Co. in the spring of 1863; he located where he now lives in March, 1871. He was married to Mary Martin, a native of Ireland; they have three children- Mary J., William, born May, 1859, and James, born February, 1861. Mr. Crawford came to Jackson Co. a poor boy; by industry and economy has acquired a fine property. He and wife are members of the M.E. Church.

CRAWFORD

The History of Jackson County, Iowa...Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1879.

James Crawford, farmer, Sec. 24; P.O. Miles; Mr. Crawford is a brother of Mr. William Crawford; was born in Ireland in 1834; he and his brother Gardner came to the United States in 1849; he lived in Livingston Co., N.Y., till the fall of 1864, when he came to Van Buren Township; he purchased the farm which he now owns. In the fall of that year, he was married to Sarah A. Alpaugh, of Steuben Co., N.Y.; they have five children- Jennie, Rosetta, Robert J., Isabella and Rutherford B. Owns eighty acres of land with good improvements.

SLY

The History of Jackson County, Iowa...Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1879

Thomas Sly, farmer, Sec. 3; P.O.Andrew, was born in Ireland, and was educated in Dublin, where he married his first wife, Mary Celvert; they had one child- William. Mr. Sly's wife died in Dublin, and, in 1850, he emigrated to Iowa, bringing his son with him; he settled where he now resides; he married his present wife, Mary E. Malone, in this Jackson county; she was born in Clarion Co., Penn; they have two children- Lilly May and Louisa Pearl. Mr. Sly is a member of the Church of England; in politics he is a Republican. He is and energetic and enterprising man, and has accumulated much valuable property; he and his son, William Sly, own 320 acres of land, finely located, well improved and possessing every natural advantage known to Jackson Co. William was born in Dublin, Ireland; he married, in this county, Elizabeth C. Malone; she was born in Huntingdon Co., Penn; they have one child- Lilly Gladys. William Sly is a Republican in politics; he has been elected to various local offices, and takes an active part in any enterprise that promises to benefit the public interests. Besides carrying on farming, Mr. Sly and son are engaged in stock-raising, in which they are very successful, having every facility for carrying on the business and having it yield remunerative returns.

MULHOLLAND

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

Mulholland, Dennis (b. 1820), one of the most prominent of the pioneers of Lake township, was a native of Ireland. In his youth he came alone to Massachusetts, where he found employment in connection with the iron industry and married Margaret McEwen. A few years later he moved to St. Louis and in 1857 to a farm in Allamakee county, Iowa. In 1865 he located on the Brockshink farm on the SW1/4 Sec. 36, Lake township, with a family of six children, and during the next five years they were the only residents of the township, the next to arrive being the families of Joseph S. Thurber and Michael Fitzgerald in 1870. He was a member of the Catholic church and lived on this farm until he died in 1873. His wife died at 72 in 1892.
Their family consisted of five children:
1. John J. one of the first trustees of the township, later became an invalid and died at St. Louis in 1897.
2. James J. in 1883 married Mary J., daughter of Nicholas Nolan, and located first on the old home farm, which he still owns. Later he moved to Gilmore City and engaged in the hardware business, and since 1901 in general merchandise. His family consists of three children, William, Frank and Christopher.
3. Mary E., a teacher, is now a dressmaker at Dubuque.
4. David, a real estate agent, in 1886 married Maggie Condon and became proprietor of a general store in Gilmore City. In 1891 he embarked in the land, loan and insurance business, in connection with the purchase of hay and grain. Since 1901 he had devoted himself to the real estate business alone. He is the owner of 320 acres of land on Sec. 11, Lake township, and of other lands in that vicinity. He has become well and favorably known as one of the leading business men of Gilmore City. He served as trustee and justice of the peace of Lake township. His family consists of four children, Matthias, Mary, Emmet and Clement.
5. William F., an insurance agent, in 1889 married Catherine, daughter of John Cain, and since 1891, has been engaged in the insurance business at Gilmore City. His family consists of four children, Frances, Margaret, Lucile and William.

LEAHY

The Pioneer History of Pocahontas County, Iowa...by Robert E. Flickinger. Fonda: G. Sanborn, 1904.

Leahy Michael Anthony (b. 1818), resident of Gilmore City and owner of a good farm on Sec. 22, Lake township, is a native of Ireland and, coming to New York state in 1847, married there that year Catherin Roache (b. Ireland 1820). He found employment in railroad building, which was then a new enterprise. After a few years he moved to Michigan and two years later to a farm in Fayette county, Wis. In the spring of 1869 he located on 40 acres on Sec. 10, Lizard township, making the journey in a wagon, and ten years later on Sec. 22 Lake township where the family has secured many acres of land. His sons are practical and successful farmers. A few years ago he moved to Gilmore City. He and his wife are both four score years of age. His family consisted of eleven children, five of whom died under 16.
Nora married Michael Higgins, and Jane married James Saddler, and both live at Gilmore City. Michael P., a mason, married Ella Crowder and lives at Pocahontas. Thomas J. and Anna are at home. John, who married in 1895, and Agnes, who married Robert Hanke, a farmer, live in South Dakota.

 

 


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