THE IRISH IN IOWA

Biographies of Those Who Came From Ireland

  DALEY

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

JOHN DALEY, farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. Toronto; owns 255 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Ireland in 1829; came to America in 1854; settled on present farm in 1865. Married Margaret Carnaghan in 1862; she was also born in Ireland; have three children -- Mary, Tisey and Margaret. Members of the M. E. Church; Republican.

DEVITT

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

JAMES DEVITT, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 20; P. O. Toronto; owns 576 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre; born in Ireland June 22, 1818; came to America in 1831, and located in Canada; settled in this county on his present farm in 1847. Married Mary Moore in 1848; she was born in Ireland; have eight children -- Eliza, Catherine S., Gilbert, Mary, Ella, James, William and John Owen. Are members of the Catholic Church.

MURPHY

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

REV. JAMES MURPHY, Pastor of Catholic Church, Toronto; born in Ireland Nov. 15, 1848; came to America in 1872, and located in Toronto. Mr. M. is a graduate of St. John's College, Waterford, Ireland.

WOLFE

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

J. E. WOLFE, Sec. 13; P. O. Toronto; owns 320 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre. Born in Ireland in 1835; settled in Iowa in 1857; married Margaret Mills in 1863; she was born in Ireland; have six children -- Edmund, Anthony, Mary, Margaret, Maurice and Celia. Are members of the Roman Catholic Church.

GILROY

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

JAMES GILROY, farmer, Sec. 10; P. 0. Lost Nation; owns 325 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born in Ireland in 1822; came to America in 1844 and located in Orange Co., N. Y., and, in the fall of 1853, removed to Iowa and settled on his present farm. Married Rosanna Hart; she, too, was born in Ireland in 1839; have eight children-James, Mary Jane, John, Ann, Peter, Agnes, Francis and Rosetta. Are members of the Catholic Church; Democrat.

ROGERS

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

EDWARD ROGERS, farmer, Sec. 30; p. o. Lost Nation; owns 240 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre; born in Scotland in 1829; came to America in 1847 ; settled on his present farm in 1854. Mr. R. has been twice married; in 1853, he married Rosa Burns; she was born in Ireland, and died in 1867; had three children-William, John and Susan; married again, in 1869,Hattie Williamson, a native of Ohio ; have two children-Mary and Eva.

GILSHANAN

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

THOS. GILSHANAN, farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Almont; he was born in 1812, in Ireland; in 1839, he came to New Orleans; in 1840, he came to Elk River Township; he owns 200 acres of land. He married Ellen Gilford in November, 1847; she was born in 1830, in Pennsylvania; died May, 1851; had two [sic] children -- Ellen, Mary and Nancy Ann; second marriage to Bridget Reynolds, in 1852; she was born in Ireland; have five children, Elizabeth, Catharine, Bernard, Mary and Henry.

McGUIRE

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

THOMAS J. McGuire, farmer. Sec. 31; P. O. Elvira; owns 310 acres of land; he was born in the city of New York Nov. 7, 1838, where he lived until 5 years of age, when his parents removed to Upper Canada, near Hamilton, where he was educated. In 1851, he removed to Scott Co., Iowa, where he resided until 1873, when he removed and permanently located in Clinton Co., where he has lived since. Served one term as Road Supervisor. He is a Democrat. He married Mary Cassady, a native of Ireland, in De Witt, Iowa, Nov. 26, 1865; has five children-Ann Genevieve, Mary Philomena, Josephine Rozella, Thomas Francis, Bridget Clara, and an adopted son, Michael Brown, all members of the Roman Catholic Church. When he commenced labor in Clinton Co., he had limited capital, and has, by hard labor, industry and economy, built a good homestead and amassed a fortune of about $20,000.

WINTERS

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

JOSEPH W. WINTERS, farmer; P. O. Elvira; lives in Section 5, and owns 520 acres of hand; he was born in Philadelphia, Penn., March 19, 1839; his family removed to Pittsburgh, where be lived until he was 7 years old, when his family removed again to Washington Co., Penn., and, in 1850, he moved to Clinton Co., and is now residing upon the old family homestead, which was entered by his father in 1851; he is the oldest son of Henry and Mary Winters, both natives of Ireland; emigrated to this country when quite young, and married in Philadelphia; had fifteen children; ten now living-Ellen, Catherine, Joseph W., Michael, Mary Ann, Patrick Henry, Hugh, Rosanna, Clara and Caroline (twins). Mr. Winters has never married. Since his residence he has filled the office of Township Trustee. He follows in the footsteps of his ancestors, and is a true blue Jacksonian Democrat. He resides upon the homestead with four of his sisters, who keep house for him, and render his old-bachelor days pleasant and comfortable. Family are all Catholics. When his father died he left no will, and, consequently, he had to buy in the old homestead, as well as the lands mentioned above; he has accumulated by industry, economy and hard labor, a handsome competency, and is worth from $35,000 to $40,000.

HART

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CLINTON RESIDENTS (Pgs 669-697)
From the book "The History of Clinton County Iowa" by L. P. Allen (1879)

HIRAM A. HART, Sec. 20; P. O. Camanche; was born in Butler Co., Ohio, in 1808; came to Iowa in 1849 and entered a tract of land; returned to Indiana, where his family was residing. He married, in Indiana, in 1848, Miss Mary J. McGuire; they have four sons and four daughters living-Abraham P., Flora B. (now Mrs. Ciswell), James W. M., Clotie (now Mrs. Smith), Charles R., Francis M., John S and Mary Jane; the parents of Mrs. H., James and Susan (Fleck) McGuire, were natives of Ireland and Indiana; her father entered a very extensive tract of land in 1849, lying between Camanche and Low Moor. In 1850, Mr. Hart removed to Iowa with his family, and improved his land, a part of which he now resides upon; his home farm consists of 800 acres. The parents of Mr. Hart, William and Annabelle (Piatt) Hart, were natives of Ohio, where they resided till their deaths. Mr. Hart was elected to the office of Representative of Dearborn Co., Ind., and served one term prior to coming to Iowa. He is a member of A., F. & A. M., in the higher degrees of that Order. He is a Democrat.

KEHOE

Wolfe's History of Clinton County, Iowa; Vol 2; B.F. Bowen & Co; Indianapolis, Indiana: 1911

Edward M Kehoe
Individual enterprise, which is so justly the boast of the American people, is strikingly exhibited in the career of the gentleman whose name forms the caption of this sketch, for he has fought his own way onward and upward from none too favorable environment to a position of prominence in the business and social world of Clinton. Being a man of indomitable energy and unwilling to be subdued by the usual reverses of life, he has removed one by one the obstacles in his pathway and is eminently deserving of the success he has achieved and the popularity which is today his.
Mr. Kehoe is a native of the city of Clinton, having been born here on September 2, 1870, and he is the son of an excellent family, Thomas and Margaret (Foley) Kehoe. The father was born in 1820 in Ireland and there grew to maturity and was educated. He emigrated to America in 1855 and settled at Alexander, Virginia, where he conducted a mercantile business and became an influential citizen. He desired to cast his lot in a new and more enterprising country, and accordingly came West in 1860 and located at Clinton, Iowa. He worked as a foreman in a grain elevator for some time and afterwards owned and operated a stone quarry in Lyons. He became well established here and he lived to an advanced age, dying in 1903. He was a member of the Catholic church and very faithful in his allegiance to the same, while, politically, he was a Democrat. He was a man of intelligence, broad-minded and of high character, and was held in high esteem for his clean principles and his generous impulses. Before leaving Ireland he was married to Margaret Foley, who was born in 1823, and she proved to be a most faithful helpmeet, and was a good woman, kind and gentle to all. Her death occurred in 1905. This union resulted in the birth of seven children, three of whom are living, namely: John, of Omaha, Nebraska; Mary E., wife of E. Keating, of Clinton; Edward M. of this review.
The subject received a good common school education and during his early life worked on the river and in a stone quarry. He was always a hard worker, and by economy saved his money until he had a start. In 1903 he purchased the Hotel Columbia in Clinton, a popular and well managed house, which is neatly kept and whose service is the best. It has thirty rooms, well furnished, and guests here receive the utmost consideration, everything being done for their comfort and convenience, consequently the house is well known and popular with the traveling public. Mr. Kehoe being a genial, obliging and generous host who understands well every detail of managing a modern hotel. In 1905 he started the Brunswick billiard parlor and cigar store, which has proven to be a very popular gathering place for the young men about town and is very extensively patronized, as is also the Brunswick Mission billiard parlor and cigar store, which he opened in 1910, in Fulton, Illinois.
Mr. Kehoe is known to the local sporting world, being vice-president of the local club of the Central Base Ball Association which he manages in a very able and worthy manner, and he assisted in the organization of the Northern Association in 1909, of which he was elected vice-president in 1910. He is independent in politics, preferring to vote for the best man rather than the party. He was reared in the Catholic faith, from which he has never departed. Fraternally he belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Mr. Kehoe will open a new hotel in Clinton, May 1, 1911, to the known as The Kehoe, a European hotel, with hot and cold water in fifty-one rooms, being located at Seventh avenue and Second street. it will have a restaurant and cafe in connection, also pool and billiard room and cigar stand.

CONNOLE
Wolfe's History of Clinton County, Iowa; Vol 2; B.F. Bowen & Co; Indianapolis, Indiana: 1911

It may be that modern conditions of living are responsible for the general poor condition  of the teeth of most persons today; it may be that our ancestors had just as much trouble in the same way, but, lacking our facilities for relief and repair of those essential organs of the body, had to bear their misery unrelieved and took it as a matter of course. Dentistry is a comparatively modern profession and is making progress. The dentist who graduated twenty years ago finds that the younger members of the profession can do things which were in his time believed impossible, and that teeth which the old time dentistry ruthlessly condemned are now saved, and the necessity for artificial teeth with which the earliest dentistry concerned itself, is largely being removed by repairing the remains of those which nature has given us. And while the profession is one which greatly benefits the race, it also usually gives to the one who practices it a fair monetary reward.
Cecil Vincent Connole was born in Clinton County, Iowa, January 14, 1878, son of Thomas L. and Fidelia E (Wampler) Connole. Thomas L. Connole was born in Jones county, Iowa, January 9, 1847, attended the public schools and has been in the grocery business for about thirty-five years, at which he has been very successful. In politics he is a Democrat, and he and his wife and family are Catholics. He was married to Fidelia Wampler, a native of Illinois, daughter of Peter Wampler, who spent his last days in Illinois.
Doctor Connole's paternal grandparents were Thomas and Hannah (Malone) Connole, both born in Ireland. In 1840 Thomas Connole came to Dubuque, Iowa, and his wife about the same time. They were married in Boston, Massachusetts. They were the parents of ten children, four sons and three daughters. Thomas was a farmer and died about 1898 and his wife in 1905. They were members of the Catholic church.
Cecil Connole grew up in DeWitt, attended the public high and parochial schools there, and took a classical course at St. Mary's, Kansas, and graduated from the Chicago College of Dental Surgery in 1901. After graduation he practiced in Chicago for about six months, then came to DeWitt to practice, and has had a very successful practice here. He is a member of the Iowa State Dental Society and of the Chicago Dental Society. In politics he is an independent voter. He and his family are members of the Catholic church.
Dr. Connole was married on October 12, 1909, to Dolorossa Schneider, who was born in Lyons, Iowa, daughter of John H and Hannah (Redden) Schneider. Her father was born in New York, her mother in Iowa, and they are still residents of Lyons, Iowa.
Doctor Connole is a man who, by the agreeableness of his nature, has made many friends. His professional success has been good, and he stands well in dental circles. He is progressive and up-to-date in all matters and takes much interest in the development of the community.

KENNEY

Wolfe's History of Clinton County, Iowa; Vol 2; B.F. Bowen & Co; Indianapolis, Indiana: 1911

It is a rare privilege to be able to spend our lives on the old home place; there is a charm under "the roof that hears our earliest cry," that never vanishes, but for some caprice of fate few of us are permitted to remain at our birthplace; we are ushered out into strange lands among strange people and are compelled to form new ties and often adopt different modes of existence. This has not been the case with Charles W. Kenney, of Clinton county, who was born on December 24, 1868, on the farm which he now occupies. He is the son of Patrick and Margaret (Blessington) Kenney, both born in Ireland, from which country they came to America in 1847 and 1840, respectively. The father came alone and after a few years spent in New York, Michigan and Wisconsin, he came to Clinton county, Iowa, in 1851 or 1852 and entered government land, being among the pioneers. He developed his one hundred and sixty acres in Hampshire township into an excellent farm, by clearing and improving it, and he was married in this county, having been a young man and single when he came here. The maternal grandparents, the Blessington famiy, came to America about 1840 and located in Vermont. They left their daughter Margaret in the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, where she found employment in the cotton mills; later she came to Clinton county, Iowa, and married Patrick Kenney. To this union eight children were born, seven of whom are living. Patrick Kenney has never been a public man, living a quiet life, yet interested in local affairs. He has lived retired in Lyons since 1893. His wife died in 1905.
Charles W. Kenny was educated in the common schools and reared on the home farm where he assisted with the work of clearing and developing and he has never cared to follow any other line of work. About 1900 he bought the old home place of one hundred and sixty acres. He has managed the same very successfully and has made a great success in stock raising, breeding high grade Aberdeen Angus cattle, draft horses and other good stock, which always find a ready market owing to their superior quality.
Politically, Mr. Kenny is a Democrat. He has been township assessor for six years and is now township trustee, and is also secretary of the school board at present. He belongs to St. Iraneaus Catholic church at Lyons, and to the Woodmen of the World.
On April 10, 1893, Mr. Kenny married Rosa V. Shannon, daughter of Patrick and Julia Shannon, old settlers of Washington township. This union resulted in the birth of eight children, namely: Charles J., Francis P., Beatrice M., Andrew, Joseph (died in infancy), Rose Lillian, Monica and James G. The mother of these children was called to her rest on May 18, 1910. She was a woman of beautiful Christian character and had a host of friends.

BERRY

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

James Berry, a resident of Iowa City, and engineer of the State University was born in Ireland in 1824; came to American in 1854; settled in Johnson county in 1858. He has been engaged at his present occupation of engineer since he came to Iowa City and has been an engineer at the State House for seven years. He was married Thanksgiving day, 1856, to Miss Sisk, a native of Ireland. The family are members of St. Patrick's church of Iowa City. They have four children living: Daniel, William, Lizzie and Hannah.

DONOHOE

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

Michael Donohoe, farmer and stock-raiser, residing on section one in Graham township; post-office, Morse, was born 1833 in Ireland, son of James and Mary Donohoe; came to America in 1853, landed in New Orleans; went to Ohio, and from there to Illinois, and finally in the fall of 1854 settled in Clear Creek township, Johnson county,  Iowa; lived there three years and moved to Iowa City and in 1859 settled in Graham township. He was married in 1856 to Miss Ellen Peters of Iowa City . This union is blessed with ten children: two boys and eight girls. The family are members of the St Maryís Roman Catholic Church. He is a democrat in politics.

DONOHOE

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

Patrick Donohoe, a farmer and stock-raiser, residing in Graham township, on section 1, post office address, Morse; was born in March 1825 in Ireland; came to America in 1849 and landed in Mobile , Alabama and lived a short time in New Orleans; moved to Ohio in 1850; remained there nine months, and moved to Warren county Illinois; lived there until 1852 and that year settled in Iowa City, and made that his home until 1855 and finally settled in Graham township. He was married in 1855 to Miss Catherine Peters of Johnson county. Iowa. The have four children, three boys and one girl. The family are members of The St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church in the Nolans settlement in Cedar County. A democrat in politics.

DUFFY

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

Michael Duffy, the subject of this sketch, was born in Ireland in 1810; came to America and to Iowa City in March 1840. He was married June 14, 1841, to Miss Helen Burns. They raised a large family of children, and he lived to see them all matured and well settled in life and able to take care of themselves. He died in March 1882 on his old homestead In section 35, twp 79, universally respected by all who came in contact with the influence of his good natured ways. He made his claim on Old Manís Creek in the Ricord settlement in 1843. He often spoke of possessing the honor of having worked on the foundation of the old capitol building, and the great pride he felt in being the man selected to throw the first shovel of dirt in breaking ground for the foundation.

FORD

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

Michael Ford, a farmer  resides in Hardin Township, post office Windham. Was born in Connaught, Ireland in 1844; came to America and landed at New York, April 18, 1873, and settled in Iowa City the same spring. He was married in 1879 to Miss Mary Drunomy of County Sligo. This union was blessed with five children: Bridget, John, Ann, Katie and Michael.

McGOVERN

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

Hugh McGovern, the present efficient county treasurer; was born in Ireland, May 8, 1824. He came to America in 1849, and settled in Iowa City in 1856.He was married in Aug, 1855, to Miss Julia Deheney. They have four children: James, Hugh, Mary, and Margaret. He is a member of the St. Patrick Catholic Church of Iowa City. He is a democrat in politics, and was elected treasurer o Johnson county in 1881.

HANLEY

History of Johnson County, Iowa...from 1836 to 1882; Iowa City, Iowa: 1883

Bartlett Hanley, a resident of Iowa City and proprietor of the Mansion House, on the corner of Maiden Lane and Lafayette street. Was born in May, 1838, in Ireland; came to America in 1848; landed in New York; came to Iowa City in 1856. He was married Feb 12, 1861, to Miss Julia E Carney of Iowa City. This union is blessed with five living children: Anthony, George, Mary, Midgie, and Johnnie. He is a democrat in politics and always takes a lively interest in the question of his party ticket. The family are members of the St. Patrick Roman Catholic Church of Iowa City. He built the Mansion House in 1879, a frame building two and one-half stories high with sixteen rooms.

O'CONNOR

Wolfe's History of Clinton County, Iowa; Vol 2; B.F. Bowen & Co; Indianapolis, Indiana: 1911

The name of Thomas C. O'Connor will ever stand in the front rank of progressive citizens of Clinton County, for he is a man who has ever manifested an abiding interest in whatever tended to promote the general good and while advancing his own interests he assists his neighbors along the highway of life, establishing a record for upright living and clean citizenship, enjoying the esteem of all classes.
Mr. O'Connor was born at Lyons, this county, November 26, 1854, and was reared on a farm. He was educated in the rural schools of the days of the old log cabin school house. He is the son of Patrick and Ellen (Dolan) O'Connor, both natives of Ireland, from which country they came to New York when young and there married. Mr. O'Connor was then employed at railroad construction work, working westward, after his marriage, on New York lines to Galena, Illinois, and crossed the Mississippi river at Lyons, Iowa, to work on the old "Calico" railroad, so called a a result of the fact that those employed in its construction were compelled to take calico for their pay. It was in 1851 that he came to Iowa, the country then being sparsely settled, when wild beasts roamed the prairies and game was plentiful. He is still living, being now ninety years of age, hale and hearty. it is interesting to hear him relate how he has seen the country grow from its virgin state to its present thriving condition. He underwent the usual hardships and deprivations of the early settler, but, being brave and not afraid of hard work, he overcame such obstacles as opposed him and played well his part in the general development of the county, and no man is worthier of a place in its history. He is a strong Democrat, but has never been a public man, preferring to be merely a plain, quiet, honest farmer. He has always been a most worthy member of the Catholic church. His cabin was often the place of worship in the days when Father McKinney, the first missionary priest, visited this locality. He was charitable to the afflicted and needy, and excellent neighbor and true friend,and was well known and highly honored by all. He now makes his home at Lost Nation. He was in the great blizzard of 1856. he and his family started to Lyons with his ox team, the morning being clear and pleasant, the storm striking in the afternoon without warning. Had they not taken shelter in a farm house they doubtless would have frozen to death. His wife died in 1906. She was the daughter of a very early settler , Mr. Dolan having been prominently identified with the early development of the county. His family consisted of ten children. The same number of children were also born to Patrick O'Connor and wife, all of whom died in early life but four, namely: Thomas C., of this review; Mike, who is farming in this county; Mary, Mrs. John Connor; Agnes has remained single.
Thomas C. O'Connor lived under his parental roof until he was thirty-two years of age, then married in 1888, soon afterwards renting a farm in Berlin township, later moving to Waterford township where he rented another farm and lived there ten years, then bought the old Williams farm, which he improved. In 1906 he bought the old homestead of his wife's father, John Bulger, which contained two hundred and ninety-five acres. He yet holds forty acres of the old Williams farm, making a good farm of three hundred and thirty-five acres, in Waterford township. He has placed extensive and modern improvements on his land and has the choice farms of the township.
In politics Mr. O'Connor is a Democrat and served very ably as constable for ten years and refused to serve longer, having no aspirations for public office, preferring to devote his time exclusively to his general farming and stock raising pursuits. He is widely known as a breeder of Belgian horses of a very high grade, also handles all kinds of good live stock, and, all in all, he is one of the prominent farmers and citizens of Waterford township. He was brought up in the Catholic church, from which faith he has never departed.
Mr. O'Connor was married to Mary E. Bulger, who was born on he old homestead, where she yet lives, in 1866, the daughter of John and Catherine (O'Brian) Bulger, both natives of Ireland, coming to America when young, and they were married at Barrington, Illinois. Soon afterwards they moved to near Fulton, that state, where Mr. O'Connor worked on a farm, later bought and improved a good farm, fed and shipped cattle and was a successful farmer and stock man. Politically, he was a Democrat and filled several minor township offices. He invested in various tracts of land about Charlotte, Clinton county, and became a well known citizen here; being among the early settlers, he helped start the physical and moral development of the township. His death occurred in January, 1882. His wife survived and remained on the old home farm twenty years, then moved to Charlotte, where he declining years were spent, dying May 6, 1905. They both belonged to the Catholic church. Their children were: Eliza, Mrs. Johnson; Margaret, Mrs. John Reid; John remained single and is now deceased; Mary E., wife of the subject; Catherine married T. Homes; Alice married John E. Dunn, of New York, he being a lighthouse engineer.
Six children have been born to Mr and Mrs Thomas O'Connor: John, born August 9, 1889, is still a member of the home circle; Silviries, born June 16, 1893; Burnadate died young; Francis, born January, 1897; Alice, born July 11, 1899; Charles, born May 25, 1907.
Fraternally Mr. O'Connor is a Woodman and politically a Democrat. Mr. O'Connor remembers well the terrible blizzard of January 1, 1856, though he was only  two years old at the time. He was with his father, who was on his way to Lyons when they were overtaken by the terrible storm, and as a reminder of the storm he shows the absence of the index finger of his right hand. So severely was he affected by the cold that Mrs. Lauderbaugh, at whose house he took refuge, thought he was frozen to death. Mr. O'Connor tells another incident of boyhood. He and his father found a deer eating their crops and they shot and wounded the animal. Instead of running away, he made at his pursuers and gave them a hard chase. The father yelled at Tom to get over the fence, which he proceeded to do with considerable alacrity. He says he was so scared he could have jumped a fourteen-rail fence if necessary.

CAIN

Wolfe's History of Clinton County, Iowa; Vol 2; B.F. Bowen & Co; Indianapolis, Indiana: 1911

Prominently identified with the farming and business interests of Deep Creek township, Clinton county, is Edward L Cain, a man who has worked long and hard for what he has and is therefore deserving of the success that is today his.
Mr. Cain was born in Union City, Michigan, April 15, 1865, was reared on a farm and educated in the rural schools and one year at St. Joseph's College, Dubuque, Iowa, also two years at St. Ambrose College, Davenport. He is the son of Edward and Celia (McKirnan) Cain, both of Ireland. They were married in New York state and remained there a short time, then moved to Michigan, where the father improved farms and set out orchards. In 1867 they moved to Jackson county, Iowa, where he bought prairie land and improved another farm; latter he sold out in Jackson county and came to Clinton county and bought land where the subject yet lives. It had been under cultivation, but there were no buildings. The subject moved and settled near and his father made his home with him and the son erected all the buildings. He has a commodious, two-story frame house, three large barns and outhouses for all contingencies, and his three hundred and sixty acres is all under fence and in pasture and cultivation. The father died here on September 2, 1904. In his active days he did general farming and raised stock and was successful. He was an early settler here, was a Democrat in politics and filled some township offices in Jackson county, was township trustee many years and held other minor township offices, filling each position with which he was entrusted with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of the people. He was well known in Jackson county and highly respected, his integrity and honor being above reproach. His wife died in January, 1882. Both were Catholics. Five children were born to them, namely: Lizzie, Mrs. O'Neil, of Montana; Thomas died in 1905, single; John is a business man of Preston, Iowa; Ellen, Mrs. John Ryan; Edward L, of this review.
Edward L Cain remained under the parental roof until he married, when he took charge of this farm and his father made his home with him during his declining years. The son has made all the substantial improvements on the farm and has a well improved place in a good state of cultivation. He has a good young orchard and a fine farm home. He is a general farmer and raises stock, which he feeds and ships to the market, having been very successful. He also holds stock in the Goose Lake Bank. He is among the leading Democrats of his township, and in Jackson county he was elected tax collector, and after settling in this township in 1904, he was elected township clerk, which position he has filled creditably to himself and satisfactorily to the people. He was brought up in the Catholic church, from which faith he has never departed.
Mr. Cain married in April, 1891, Margaret Flynn, who was born in this township November 13, 1865, and who has proved a worthy wife and good helpmate. She is the daughter of Mathew and Margaret (Phelan) Flynn, both natives of Erin's green isle, but they were married in Clinton county. He came to America when nineteen years old, and spent a few years in the east. About 1835 or 1836 he came west to Dubuque, Iowa and followed such labor as he could find to do and, after a few years at Dubuque, came to Clinton county about 1837, as a pioneer and entered land in Deep Creek township and improved it. Later he married, and made a government settlement, being a pioneer in the settlement. He helped lay the foundation for moral and physical development and for good government. He was a strong Democrat and well posted on all matters of public interest, using his influence for the party. He was a hard working man and by good management he created a good estate, a large, valuable farm and was a general farmer and raised and fed stock for market. He gave his farm and products all his attention. He was a broad minded, intelligent farmer and a good financier. He was social and enjoyed friends, was charitable to the afflicted and needy, a good neighbor and friend. When he first came he did his milling at Hauntown, on the Elk river. He was among the first to settle here, and he underwent many deprivations and hardships such as all early settlers had to undergo. He was a strong Democrat, but had held no office. He was a constant and worthy member of the Catholic church. He died April 3, 1890, and is buried by the church in the Catholic cemetery. His wife, who died in April, 1900, was also a Catholic.
Six children were born to Mr and Mrs Flynn, the wife of Mr. Cain being the fifth in order of birth. To Mr and Mrs Cain have been born five children, namely: Matthew, Anna, Joseph, Ella and Cecelia, all living at home. Mr and Mrs Cain are consistent and worthy members of the Catholic church and are educating and bringing up their children in that faith.

 


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