THE IRISH IN IOWA

Biographies of Those Who Came From Ireland

McNAMARA

Brewer, Luther A. and Barthinius Wick. History of Linn County, Iowa From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time Vol II. Chicago: Pioneer Publishing Company, 1911.

     Frank P. McNamara, a well known farmer and prominent citizen of Buffalo township, has spent his entire life in Linn county, his birth occurring here on the 18th of February, 1866. His parents, John and Ann (Slattery) McNamara, were natives of Ireland and on their emigration to America in 1849, located in Buffalo, New York, where they spent two years. At the end of that time, however, they came to Iowa and for five years made their home in Jones county. The father then purchased forty acres of land in Buffalo township, Linn county, whereon the family took up their abode. As an agriculturist he steadily prospered and bought more land from time to time as his financial resources increased until he had accumulated five hundred acres in this county, one hundred acres in Jones county, and six hundred and forty acres in South Dakota. His Linn county property he placed under a high state of cultivation and improved by the erection of good, substantial buildings. He continued the operation of his farm for many years but finally deeded eighty acres to each of his children as they became of age. After a useful and well spent life he passed away May 10, 1900, and his wife, who had been a faithful helpmate to him throughout her life, died February 25, 1903. They were communicants of the Catholic church and were laid to rest in Castle Grove Catholic cemetery.
     Frank P. McNamara was reared in much the usual manner of farm lads, acquiring his literary education in the schools near his boyhood home. He was twenty-five years of age when he left the parental roof and settled on the eighty acres of land given to him by his father and to its improvement and cultivation he has since devoted his energies. He has extended the boundaries of his farm from time to time, however, and now has two hundred and forty acres of very valuable and productive land which has been improved by himself and is now one of the best farms of the county. He has always devoted considerable attention to the raising of fine stock but has never made a specialty of any particular breed except the Hereford cattle.
     Mr. McNamara was married January 24, 1894, to Miss Katy Drummy who, like her husband, acquired a good common school education in her youth. Her parents are W. F. and Lizzie (Kehoe) Drummy, the former a native of New York and the latter of Delaware county, Iowa. They were married on the 25th of October, 1875, and located upon a farm in Delaware county. Both are still living. Eleven of the fifteen children born to them also survive. To Mr. and Mrs. McNamara have been born ten children, as follows: Francis P., who was born October 26, 1894, and died August 2, 1896; Thomas E., born February 26, 1896; John W., born August 8, 1897; Elizabeth B., born December 21, 1898; William Joseph, born July 4, 1900; Emlin A., born May 16, 1902; Bernard A., born May 15, 1903; Anna M., born May 30, 1905; Frances D., born June 4, 1907; Bernice M., born June 30, 1909. The parents are faithful members of the Catholic church and in his political views Mr. McNamara is liberal, supporting the men and measures he believes best calculated to promote the public welfare. He is a progressive and public-spirited citizen and gives his earnest support to those measures which he believes will advance the general welfare of the community in which he resides.

GAWLEY

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

ECCLES W. GAWLEY, M. D. The calling of a physician is not only one of the most arduous but one of the most responsible pursuits in which a man can engage, and he who attains a high reputation in this calling must necessarily be endowed with physical endurance, keen intelligence and excellent judgment. The subject of this sketch is one whose extensive
practice and high standing in the profession prove conclusively his mental endowments. He was born in Ireland in 1850, and is descended from a long line of prominent physicians.
Our subject attended the schools of his native place, which were noted for their high standard, until reaching his twenty-first year, when he determined to seek his fortune in another country. He consequently emigrated to Canada and after spending a few months there crossed into the States. It was his desire to fit himself for a professional career. Entering the Medical Department of the University of Michigan, he spent two years, after which he went to Detroit and became a student in the Detroit Medical College, from which institution he was graduated in 1875. Dr. Gawley then remained in the City of Straits engaged in practice for two years, and at the end of that time came to Iowa, locating at once in Anamosa. Since coming hither Dr. Gawley has built up an extensive and growing practice and is often called upon to visit patients in adjoining states. He also conducts a sanitarium for the accommodation of those placed under his care. He is rarely adapted to his profession by nature and temperament, possessing, as he does, fine, sympathetic feelings, a high sense of honor, a clear brain, steady nerve and the other essentials of a true physician. The Doctor has a fine library of medical works and a well equipped office. In 1879 our subject was married to Miss Mamie C. Coats, of Dubuque. The Doctor, socially, is a member of the Iowa Union Medical Society and in 1885 was appointed, during Cleveland's administration, Secretary of the Pension Board of Examiners, which position he holds at the present time. He is a
man of practical business talent and financial ability, and by judicious investment of his money has become well-to-do.

--Contributed by Becky Teubner

.

HOLT

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     EDWARD   C. HOLT, Postmaster at Anamosa, is greatly respected for those qualities of head and heart which have won for him the esteem and confidence of all with whom he associates. He is popular in his official capacity, and is discharging the duties of his position with characteristic fidelity and greatly to the satisfaction of all concerned.
     Our subject was born in Ireland January 8, 1832, and when three years old emigrated to New Brunswick in company with his parents, who made their home in St. John's. There he attended school, and upon completing his education learned the trade of a stone and brick mason, together with plastering, under the instruction of Otis Small, of Bangor, Me.
March 30, 1857, Mr. Holt crossed into the States, coming, May 30, to Anamosa, which at that time was a small town. He immediately found work at his trade and ere long began contracting, building stores, dwellings and churches. He was thus employed until 1893, when, having accumulated a sufficiency of this world's goods, he retired from active business, devoting his time to looking after his property in the city.
         In the spring of 1894 Mr. Holt was appointed Postmaster of Anamosa, entering upon the duties of the office May 9, 1894. He is a stanch Democrat in politics, and has served as Chairman of the Central Committee. He has always been interested in educational affairs and for a period of twelve years rendered efficient service on the School Board.  Mr. Holt,
with his family, occupies a beautiful residence in the city and numbers his friends among its best residents.
         In 1861 Edward C. Holt and Miss Mary A. T. Sales were united in marriage. The lady was the daughter of Dr. Nathan G. Sales, who was a prominent physician and politician of this city and a most praiseworthy citizen. He held the office of Receiver of Moneys in the land office at Chariton, Iowa, from 1853 to 1856, under the administration of Franklin
Pierce. He departed this life December 24, 1892. Mrs. Holt departed this life June 19, 1885, leaving a family of six children, namely: Tirzah C., Josie A., Harry J., Eddie S., Clara L. and Nellie. Harry J. assists his father in the post-office. Mr. Holt built the brick opera house on the
corner of Maine and Garnavillo Streets in 1867, and is still the owner of that property besides much other valuable real estate in the city.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner

McCANN

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     HON. JAMES McCANN, one of the best known citizens  of   Dubuque, represents
his district in  the State Legislature and takes a prominent part in public and political affairs, his name being  inseparably connected with the history of this community.   He was born in Ireland on the 27th of August, 1840, and is a son of Patrick McCann, who in 1845 came to America, landing at New York City, whence he made his way to Dubuque. His death occurred here in 1891, at the advanced age of eighty-two years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Ellen Morgan, is still living in Dubuque, and is now (1894) seventy-five years of age.
     Our subject was a child of only five summers when with his parents he crossed the ocean and became a resident of Dubuque,  where the greater part of his life has since been passed.   He was educated in the common schools and at the age of fifteen years began working on his father's farm, where was employed until twenty years of age, but in 1860 he abandoned
agricultural pursuits and made an overland trip to Colorado, in the hope of more rapidly acquiring wealth in that state. He there engaged in gold mining for five years, and for three years and a-half had charge of the Smith & Parmalee gold mine. In 1865 he returned to his old home and resumed farming, which he successfully carried on until 1874. He then opened an agricultural implement store and was engaged in business along that line for seven years.
     The official career of Mr. McCann began in 1881, when he was elected Sheriff of Dubuque County, and so ably did he discharge the duties of the office that he was four times re-elected, serving in all for eight years. In 1889 he embarked in the real-estate business, which he conducted for two years. In 1891 he was elected on the Democratic ticket to represent Dubuque
County in the Twenty-fourth General Assembly of Iowa. Two years later he was re-elected, and is now serving as State Representative with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents, He received the caucus nomination of his party for the office of Speaker of the House, but the Republicans being in the majority he was defeated. He has taken quite a
prominent part in politics, and is recognized as one of the leaders of the Democracy in Iowa, and is now Chairman of the Congressional Committee of the Third Congressional District. In the fall of 1892 he aided in the organization of the Excelsior Brass Works, and was made President and General Manager of the same, which position he held until July 10, 1893,
when he sold his interest in the enterprise.
     On the 22d of February, 1865, occurred the marriage of Mr. McCann and Miss Catherine A. Dawson, of Dubuque, daughter of Nicholas Dawson, who is numbered among the honored pioneers of this city in 1837. Mrs. McCann died April 22, 1893, leaving six children, three sons and three daughters, James A.; Lucy M., who is now engaged in teaching; Frank N., a contractor of Dubuque; Charles V., Ruth and Stella. Mr. McCann is a member of the
Catholic Church, and with his family resides at No. 1573 Main Street.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner

DOUGHERTY

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     JOHN DOUGHERTY is one of the natives of Ireland who have been prominent in  the development  and  success of Linn County, where he has resided from its early days. He owns a good homestead situated on section 7, Buffalo Township, and  to  the improvement of   this property he has devoted the past quarter of a century.
     The birth of our subject occurred in the northern part of the Emerald Isle in 1836. He is a son of Michael and Anna Dougherty, who like him were natives of Ireland, where they passed their entire lives. The boyhood and youth of our subject were passed near the place of his birth and he received such school advantages as the neighborhood afforded until he was fifteen years of age. He was a great reader and an ambitious young man and early made up his mind that he would try his fortunes in America. Accordingly in 1851, when in- his sixteenth year, he took passage on a sailing-vessel bound for New York City. On reaching his destination he proceeded to Cambria County, Pa., and secured employment for a time near
Johnstown. As he was possessed of industrious and persevering qualities, and was ready to work at whatever came to hand by which he could make an honest dollar, he managed to lay aside regularly a small sum, and five years after landing in the United States a stranger without any means, he came to Iowa and secured a contract on railway construction work. In that line of business he acted as a foreman for some years and made a good success of his undertakings.  During this time his home was mainly in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, but he kept his eyes and ears open to opportunities, and becoming confident that Jones County was an ideal location for enterprising farmers, he came here in 1867 and became the owner of a small tract of land. To this as the years have passed he has continually added adjoining land until his farm now numbers two hundred and eighty acres. This property, which is very fertile, is finely adapted for the raising of certain crops and brings in the owner a steady income, amply sufficient for the needs of his family; he is also enabled to lay aside a certain sum for
his declining years. The property is well improved with good barns and a substantial residence and the owner takes great pride in keeping everything about the place in good order.
July 3, 1861, Mr. Dougherty was married in Cascade, Iowa, to Miss Mary Hayes, who was born in Ireland. The worthy couple have had born to them nine children, four sons and five daughters, who in the order of their birth are as follows: Maggie, John, Annie, Mary, Barney, Sadie, Tressa, Grace and James.
         Mr. and Mrs. Dougherty were reared in the faith of the Catholic Church, to which they still adhere and are regular attendants of the congregation of Buffalo. Politically our subject is a Democrat and takes great interest in all matters relating to the affairs of his party, He
lives in Linn County but owns land in Jones County, where he carries on business.

--Contributed by Becky Teubner

McDERMOTT

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     A. S. McDERMOTT, dealer in agricultural implements, is the senior member of the firm of McDermott & Biggins of Dubuque.  In this city he was born on the 18th of September, 1834, and is therefore one of its oldest residents, his parents being among the honored pioneer settlers of the county. His father, James McDermott, was a native of Ireland, and on emigrating to the United States, took up his residence in Pottsville, Pa.  He was united in
marriage with Priscilla Lendeman, whose father was a Frenchman and his mother a German lady. The year 1833 witnessed the arrival of James McDermott in Dubuque. Here he engaged in lead mining until 1837, when he removed to Prairie Creek Township and began farming, which occupation he followed until his death in 1877. He was born July 4, 1804. He took an
active part in public affairs, did all in his power to promote the growth and upbuilding of the community, and in politics was a supporter of the Democratic party. His wife, who was born in 1812, was called to her final rest in 1883, at the age of seventy-one years.
     A. S. McDermott has the honor of being the first male child born in the city of Dubuque.    He spent his boyhood days upon the farm and was early inured to the arduous task of developing wild land. His educational privileges were limited, but his training in the fields was by no means meagre. When he entered upon a business career for himself it was as a
farmer, and to the improvement and cultivation of his land he devoted his energies until 1854, when he came to Dubuque and learned the carpenter's trade. On the 5th of June, 1855, he left this city and went to Rice County,Minn., with a squad of men under Gen. James Shields, who went thither in order to  establish a settlement and became the pioneers of that locality. They founded a trading post and engaged in trading with the Indians all through  the country as far up as Lake Superior.   Mr. McDermott learned the language of  the red men, with whom he could converse  fluently in their own tongue.    He remained in Minnesota until the fall of 1857, when we again find him in Dubuque.   In the spring of 1864 he went to
Montana.   On the 1st of March he left home and crossed  the plains to Virginia City, where he arrived on the 10th of July, 1864. He was there engaged in gold mining until the 15th of October of the same year, when he crossed the mountains into Idaho and made his way to Idaho City; there he opened a carpenter shop, carrying on business along that line for a
time.   Later he traveled through Oregon, Washington, California and British America, and on  the 31st of October, 1866,  returned   to Dubuque.   He  then resumed farming, which he carried on until 1881.  He was regarded as one of the leading agriculturists of the community, a reputation which was sustained by the neat and thrifty appearance of his place. Mr. McDermott was married December 21, 1858, to Miss Margaret McDermott, a
native of Ireland.  To them have been born eight children, five sons and three daughters: H. J., who is now living in St. Paul, Minn.; C. J., also of St. Paul; Ambrose, of Butte City, Mont.; Gus P. and John A., of Dubuque; Mary and Maria, at home, and a daughter deceased.
         In the spring of 1881, Mr. McDermott formed a partnership with Hon. James McCann and together they engaged in the sale of agricultural implements until Mr. McCann was elected Sheriff of Dubuque County. The connection was then discontinued and Mr. McDermott was alone in business until 1893, when he was joined by Thomas F. Biggins. Under the firm style of McDermott & Biggins they now conduct business and are enjoying an extensive trade which they well merit. In 1871 our subject patented the McDermott Cultivator and has since manufactured the same. He was one of the organizers of the McDermott Cultivator Company, and as early as 1868 he had attached a spring to the cultivator which he patented. He has also issued several other patents and his inventions are useful and are now much used. He possesses much genius as a mechanic and is a man of more than ordinary ability, who well deserves mention among the best citizens of Dubuque. He has traveled extensively over this country, especially in the northwest, and is a well informed man. In politics he is a Democrat.  He and his family are members of the Roman Catholic Church.

--Contributed by Becky Teubner

FOLEY

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     JOHN FOLEY.  This substantial resident of Anamosa is engaged as a railroad contractor, and also is the owner of a good farm in Fairview Township.  He is a native of Ireland, having been born February 18, 1838. His parents, Thomas and Mary (Kelly) Foley, were also natives of  the Emerald Isle, the former corning to the United States when advanced in years.  John, when emigrating hither, landed in New York City, whence he made his way into Champaign County, Ohio, where he attended school for one winter, and then began working on the Columbus & Cleveland Railroad.
     In 1856 the subject of this sketch went to Wisconsin, where he was employed on the La Crosse & Milwaukee Road, and afterward removed to Watertown, that state, working for the Chicago & Northwestern, and afterward as an employe for the Janesville & Oshkosh Road. Three years later young Foley came to Iowa, making his headquarters for a time in Ottumwa in the employ of the Des Moines Valley Railroad Company, in grading the road bed. He afterward was engaged by the Illinois Central, and located at Waterloo, this state. In the year 1860, our subject came to Anamosa, in the employ of the Milwaukee & St. Paul Road, laying the track between this city and Sperryville. After completing this work he went to Benton County and constructed the road between Cedar Rapids and Marshalltown for the Northwestern Road. We next find Mr. Foley in Lanark, Ill., working for the Milwaukee & St. Paul under Captain Smith, on that portion of the road lying between Freeport and Savannah.
     March 26, 1864, our subject again came to this city and was married to Miss Nora Sullivan, of Anamosa, and the daughter of Michael and Ellen Sullivan, natives of Ireland. After his marriage  Mr. Foley was engaged in farm pursuits for two years, but finding this business did not suit him, again engaged in railroad work, this time for the Chicago & Northwestern. In 1867 he worked for a time on the Rock Island, and the same year laid the track of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy between Clinton and Indianola. In 1870 our subject returned to Anamosa, investing his surplus money in real estate and carried on general farming for the succeeding three years. His possessions now aggregate eight hundred acres, five hundred of which are under the best methods of improvement. His farm is stocked with fine animals, has an ample supply of buildings, including a commodious dwelling
and good barn. In addition to this property Mr. Foley owns a fine grocery store in Anamosa, which is carried on by his son, Thomas W. As has already been seen, our subject is a truly self-made man. During his childhood he experienced many disadvantages, but not withstanding discouragements he pushed ahead, and the result proves the wisdom of his
course. He has in vested his money judiciously, has a beautiful home in the city, and is prepared to spend the declining years of his life in peace and comfort, surrounded by many of the luxuries of life. With his good wife, Mr. Foley is a member of St. Patrick's Church at Anamosa, in the faith of which they have trained their children.

--Contributed by Becky Teubner-

KELLY

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     JAMES  KELLY   is a  representative  of the mercantile interests of Dubuque, being the senior member of the firm of Kelly & Son dealers in  books, stationery and periodicals. They have a well appointed store, equipped with everything found in a first-class establishment of the kind, and carry a large and well assorted stock of books and stationery, together with all the latest periodicals. The members of the firm are pleasant, genial gentlemen, who try earnestly to please their customers, and by their courteous treatment and honorable dealing they have won a liberal patronage. Mr. Kelly, whose name heads this record, is a native of the Emerald Isle, and attended the public schools of that country until sixteen years of age.
In the spring of 1852 he sailed for the United States, hoping to find here a home and fortune. For two years he lived with an uncle at Lancaster, Pa., and attended the high school. For two years he engaged in clerking in a general store owned by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Pennsylvania Railroad Company, On the expiration of that period he determined to
continue his journey westward, and in accordance with this resolution came to Dubuque, where for two years he was employed as a salesman by the firm of McGuire & Co., dealers in books and stationery. In 1853 he began business for himself on a small scale, opening a news stand which he stocked with periodicals and home newspapers. He was the first man to
establish a news stand in the state. His business increased with the growth of the city's population, and he added a stock of books and stationery. He is now one of the oldest news and book dealers, in years of continuous business, in the state, He counts his customers by the hundreds, for his courteous treatment always insures the continuance of patronage when once obtained. His store is located at No. 747 Main Street, and is 21x70 feet in dimensions.
     In 1865 Mr. Kelly was united in marriage with Miss Katie Fitzpatrick, daughter of John Fitzpatrick, an old and highly respected citizen of Dubuque, who came hither in 1840. Unto our subject and his wife have been  born seven children, five sons and two daughters, namely: three boys who died when young; Clermont D., who is now clerking in Chicago; Joseph T., who is now associated with his father in business, under the firm name of James Kelly & Son; and Mary and Isabel, who are yet at home. Mr. Kelly and his family are all members of St. Raphael's Catholic Church.
         They reside at No. 394 Bluff Street, and their home is noted for its hospitality, its doors being ever open for the reception of their many friends. They are highly esteemed, and with pleasure we present to our readers this record of their lives. Mr. Kelly is a self-made man, who
entered upon his business career at an early age in the humble capacity of a clerk. Thus he labored until he had acquired a sum sufficient to establish a small news stand, when he began business for himself. Steadily has he worked his way upward, and his resolution, enterprise and perseverance have brought him well merited success.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner-

HILLOCK

Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamilton Counties, Iowa. Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1888.

     H.C. Hillock, section 32, Rose Grove Township, was born in Tecumseh, Lenawee County ,Michigan, November 28, 1836. His father, Hugh Hillock was a native of the north of Ireland, and came to the United States when a lad. He was married in Ithaca, New York, to Euphelia Landon, a native of New Jersey, and they moved to Lenawee County, Michigan, in 1824, being early settlers of that county. The father went to California in 1852 and returning home via New York, died at Ithaca. H.C. Hillock was reared in Michigan and was given good educational advantages. In 1856 he came to Iowa, making the trip to Davenport by rail, thence by stage to Iowa Falls and from there to Webster City on foot, arriving at the latter place April 7. The first year he worked for Willson brothers. In 1857 he was one of the expedition who went from the county to take part in quelling the troubles at Spirit Lake, and for some years was a member of the Northern Border Brigade and was stationed at Cherokee, Peterson and Spirit Lake. In 1864 he opened a meat market, which he conducted in connection with buying and shipping stock for several years. He was appointed sheriff of the county to fill an unexpired term, and the following year was elected to the office and served two years, and the following two years served as deputy. In 1874 he moved to Rose Grove Township and settled on the farm where he now resides, which he had bought some years before and had partially improved. His farm contains 320 acres, being the east half of the section. Six acres of it is a fine grove of chestnut and other forest trees, there being about 1,000 tress of the former variety, and he also has a small orchard and an abundance of small fruit. His farm is all under cultivation and his building improvements are comfortable and convenient, all having been erected by Mr. Hillock with a view of making this his permanent home. In politics Mr. Hillock affiliates with the Republican party, and is one of its standard bearers in Hamilton County. He has at different times held most of the township offices and has also served on the board of county supervisors. He was married in October, 1865, to Jennie M. Carpenter, a native of Astabula County, Ohio, daughter of William and Isabel (Lusk) Carpenter. They have four children- Carrie Belle, Grace E., Benjamin Lewis, and Hugh Royden.

CARR

Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamilton Counties, Iowa. Chicago: Lewis Publishing, 1888.

     J.J. Carr, farmer and stock raiser, section 25, Rose Grove Township, is a native of Canada, born June 7, 1857, a son of Robert Wallace and Jeanette (Henson) Carr. His father was a native of Ireland, and came to America when a young man and located in Canada, where he was married and lived until 1865, when he removed to Hamilton County, Iowa, and settled in Rose Grove Township, where he still lives. J.J. is the second of a family of four sons and two daughters. He was reared in his native country and Iowa, and was given the benefits of a good common school education and is one of the enterprising young men of the township. He has a good farm of 180 acres, well improved, with good residence and farm buildings. He is engaged in general farming and stock-raising and some of the finest stock in the county can be found on his farm. He was married September 6, 1883, to Hattie Hennefin, a native of Hardin County, Iowa, daughter of Calvin E. and Malinda R. (Cacfin) Hennefin. To them have been born two children- Nora Emma and Cora Rebecca. In politics Mr. Carr is a Democrat. He has served as a member of the school board, taking an active interest in the cause of education and all interests of benefit to the community. He is a public spirited man and is a liberal supporter of all enterprises that tend to elevate the people of the county as well as all that promises advancement to its material interests.

McNAMARA

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

MF. McNAMARA, Supervisor of Dubuque County, is one of those progressive, wide-awake farmers who find both pleasure and profit in cultivating the soil, and by means of dignity and ability tend to raise the standard of their chosen occupation. His possessions aggregate five hundred and forty acres on section 27, Table Mound Township, and they form one of
the most valuable and highly cultivated tracts in the county. Our subject was born in the city of Dubuque, August 17, 1840, and is the son of John McNamara, a native of Ireland, who came to America when a lad of seventeen years. The latter was born June 24, 1804, and prior to his emigration had received a fair education in the public schools near his home. In 1835 he located in Dubuque, where he worked in the lead mines by the day for a time, after which he engaged in business for himself for twelve years. At the end of that time John McNamara purchased four hundred acres of land in Table Mound Township, which he placed under admirable tillage and resided upon until 1874, when, having accumulated a handsome
fortune, he retired and moved to the city of Dubuque. He was well and favorably known throughout the county, and departed this life April 6, 1880, greatly mourned by all who knew him. His brother, Michael McNamara, was a civil engineer and for a time was inspector of arms and ammunition in the army, and served under General Jackson for five years.
The maiden name of our subject's mother was Bridget Gearon, of French descent. Her father served as a Colonel in the French army. Mrs. McNamara was born in Ireland, and when fifteen years of age was orphaned and emigrated with friends to America. She made her home for a time in Troy, N. Y., after which she came to Dubuque, and in 1839 was married to John
McNamara. She departed this life in 1861 at the age of fifty years.
         The parental family of our subject comprised one daughter and three sons, of whom M. F., was the eldest. John, born in 1841, died at the age of twenty years; Catherine, born in 1843, became the wife of James Boland, of Dubuque, and James E. was born in July, 1845, and died May 21, 1891. M. F. received his primary education in the schools of Dubuque, and
also attended in Table Mound Township. He afterward carried on his studies in Bully's College, in Dubuque, from which institution he was graduated in 1873. The year prior to receiving his diploma, however, he opened a grain and commission business with M. Brown, and continued to operate with him for four years. At that time our subject disposed of his interest in the business and moved to Parsons, Kan., where he engaged in the same business
and at the same time owned a half-interest in a steam flouring mill in that city. He remained there until the spring of 1881, when he returned to Dubuque and located on the old homestead, having previously purchased the property from the rest of the heirs. He has since carried on the business of a general farmer, giving special attention to raising of fine grades of stock, and has on his estate some of the finest and most valuable animals to be found in the county.
     Mr. McNamara cast his first Presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln, and continued to vote the straight Republican ticket until an effort was made to nominate Grant for the third term, since which time he has cast his ballot for Democratic candidates. He has been the recipient of various offices of trust within the power of his fellow-townsmen to bestow, and for
three terms was Clerk of his township and is now serving his second term as County Supervisor.
     October 6, 1876, our subject and Miss Bell Armstrong were united in marriage. The lady was born in Nebraska City, Neb., in October, 1858. Her grandfather served as a patriot in the Revolutionary War, and made his home where is now the city of Cincinnati, before there was any indication of its reaching its future greatness in numbers. To Mr. and Mrs. McNamara there have been born three sons and five daughters, bearing the respective names of Estella K, born in 1878, who is attending school in Dubuque; John A,, born in 1879; Jennie, in 1882; Lorena, in 1883; Lettitia B., in 1885; Willard F., in 1886; Leona, in 1888, and Michael F., in 1890. Mr. McNamara is a devout member of the Catholic Church, in the faith of which he is
rearing his children.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner-

McGAHAREN

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

HENRY G. McGAHAREN.  Among the enterprising and active young business men of Elkader is the gentleman whose name heads this sketch and who now occupies the responsible position of Cashier in the Elkader State Bank. He is well educated and well informed on general topics, and having a mathematical turn of mind is just the man to fill the place which was unanimously tendered him by the Directors and officials of this institution. His trustworthy and honorable principles, in addition to his other qualifications, have won for him this place of honor and responsibility.
     One of the native sons of Iowa, our subject was born in Fayette County in 1864. He comes from a long lived family, his father, M. M., having lived to attain the age of ninety-one years, and his mother, who was in her girlhood Rosa Sheridan, is still living at the age of four-score years. M. M. McGaharen was a native of the Emerald Isle, and on coming to the United States settled in Iowa, being one of the pioneers of Fayette County, where he followed agricultural pursuits with good success until well along in years, his death occurring in February, 1898. In politics he was a pronounced Democrat, and was always active and interested in all public improvement and in school affairs. His wife was likewise born in Ireland.
         The early years of Henry G. were passed in Fayette County, and he acquired a good knowledge of agricultural pursuits on the old homestead, giving his assistance to his father in operating the farm. He pursued his studies in the common schools of the neighborhood, after which it was his privilege to attend the Decorah Institute, which is located at Decorah,
Winneshiek County, this state, where he continued his studies for three years. In 1887 he began his business career by clerking in the drug store operated by Bayless & Hagensick. During this time he studied to become a pharmacist, and secured a diploma from the State Board of Pharmacy on the completion of a required course and after passing a strict examination. The same year he took charge of the Elkader Drug Company of this place, which
position he held until October, 1892. The State Bank of Elkader was then organized and he was offered the position of Cashier, which he accepted, having held the post up to the present time. Being a young man of great ability, he has shown himself to be fully capable of discharging the duties of this position, and by his genial and affable manner makes many friends and customers for the bank. His home is in this city, where he is received in the best social circles. Though a young man, he has considerable general business experience and manifests great sagacity and good judgment in dealing with financial matters.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner-

MAGUIRE

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894


 J.E. MAGUIRE, M, D., who now devotes his time and energies to the practice of medicine in Dubuque, is one of the younger members of the medical fraternity, but possess skill and ambition, which will no doubt win him a place among the leading physicians of this locality.   He was born in East Dubuque, Ill., on the 1st of June, 1870, and is a son of Thomas Maguire, native of Ireland, who bade adieu to the Emerald Isle, and crossed the Atlantic to America.   He took up his residence in East Dubuque in an early day, and is still engaged in merchandising in that place, one of its representative and well known citizens.   The   mother of the Doctor bore the maiden name of Ellen Grath.  She is a native of Racine, Wis., and a
daughter of Peter Grath, one of the honored pioneers of Jo Daviess County, Ill.
     The Doctor spent the days of his boyhood and youth in his native city, being reared in his parents' home, and completed his literary education by his graduation from the high school of Dubuque in 1886. Previous to this time he had taken a business course of study in the Bayless Commercial College of Dubuque, from which he was graduated in 1882. He was an apt scholar and his studious disposition and earnest application have made him
a well informed man.
         In 1890, Doctor Maguire, with the view of fitting himself for his life work, entered the Medical department of Iowa State University of Iowa City, and was graduated from that institution in the spring of 1893. In the summer of the same year he opened an office in Dubuque, where he has since conducted a general practice in medicine and surgery. He is now doing a successful business, and has the regard of not only his patrons, but also the members of the profession. He has also spent some time in the Chicago Polyclinic School, and is a member of the Dubuque Medical Society. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the Democratic party.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner-

McLAUGHLIN

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

    JOHN A. McLAUGHLIN is one of the prominent and well-to-do farmers of Castle Grove Township, his postoffice being Monticello. His history has been during his entire life interwoven with that of Jones County, for here his birth occurred June 13, 1845, and, with the exception of a few terms when he was away at college, he has rarely been outside the county limits. He comes from one of the worthy pioneer families who were the founders of the prosperity which has come in so great a measure to this region. His parents, James and Mary (Hill) McLaughlin, were both natives of Ireland, who, when in childhood, came to the United States. Their marriage was solemnized in New York State, and in 1837 they came to Jones County, locating on a piece of land in Wayne Township, which is now the property of
the Hon. George W. Lovell. At that early day there were few neighbors and no schools or other advantages.
     The family later removed to Castle Grove Township, where the father entered a tract of land from the Government, and from time to time, as his resources increased, extended the boundaries of his farm, until, at the time of his death, which occurred in 1873, he owned a valuable farm comprising five hundred acres. The faithful wife and mother, who had truly
been a helpmate in every sense of the word to her industrious husband, survived him many years, passing from this life in 1892. By her marriage she became the mother of three sons and three daughters, namely, Anna, Elizabeth, Michael, James W., John A., and Mary J., who died at the age of seven years.
     John A. McLaughlin is the fourth in order of birth of the surviving children of his parents. He received a good district school education, and afterwards attended the Hopkinton (now Lenox) College, located at Hopkinton, Iowa. In 1863 he went to Wisconsin, where he passed six months in college work, and on leaving there prosecuted his studies for two terms in the excellent Notre Dame University of South Bend, Ind. Later he returned to Lenox College, being a student there for two terms more. Thus equipped for the practical duties of life with a good foundation of general knowledge and information, the young man returned to the old homestead and began in earnest to make his own way. In his boyhood he had been familiar
from actual practice with general farm duties, and now began paying special attention to stock raising and dairy farming. From forty to fifty cows were daily milked, the product being sold to neighboring creameries, arid from this source a steady and reliable income was derived. The first purchase by our subject was one hundred and sixty acres of land in this township, he has pushed his business enterprises successfully, and as his means accumulated invested in more land, and has continued in this policy until he now finds himself the fortunate possessor of eight hundred acres of valuable land, most of which is under high cultivation. The buildings on the farm are substantial and well kept. There are two large barns, a fine residence and attractive surroundings, and everything about the place gives
evidence of the careful supervision of the owner.
         In 1877 Mr. McLaughlin married Miss Allie Downer, of Jones County, who was born and reared within its limits. Her father, the late Horace Downer, was one of the early settlers and pioneers of this locality. To Mr. and Mrs. McLaughlin have been born six sons and a daughter, whose names are as follows: Frank J., William, John, Rollo, Clarence, Minnie and Eugene. In his political faith our subject is a thorough-going Republican, having given that party his support since he was first able to vote. He has never sought nor desired public office.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner-

ROCHE

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

    REV. LAWRENCE F. ROCHE, Pastor  of St. Martin's Catholic Church of Cascade, was born in Ireland in 1850.  He received his education in that country and was ordained by Archbishop Patrick Tealey, of Cashel, Ireland.  He came to America in 1872 and settled in Dubuque. He was  afterward given  charge of St. Peter's Church  at Temple  Hill,  Jones County, and in 1876 was transferred to St. Anthony's Church at Davenport, where  he  remained  five years.   Returning to Dubuque at the expiration of that time our subject took charge of the Cathedral in that city and continued as its pastor until he came to Cascade.   This congregation was originally attended by the Rev. Father Predine about fifty years ago.  It was then a small mission  and the pastor only visited them occasionally in order to attend to their spiritual wants.  He was succeeded by Rev. Father Tracy, who was stationed at Garry
Owen. The Cascade Mission was separated from Garry Owen and attached to Temple Hill, which was a flourishing Catholic settlement in an early day as it is at present.  The Rev. Father McGinnis, now deceased, was pastor of the church at that time. The building in which they met for worship was a small brick structure near where the present large church now stands.   Resident priests supplied the congregation for  some time, among whom  was the Rev. George A. Hamilton, who remained with them for six months; Rev. James Slatterly succeeded, and in 1860 the Rev. J. O'Connor took charge, remaining for one year. He was followed by Rev. James Cunningham, whose death occurred two years later. Rev. Michael Lynch was then called and for eleven years he faithfully served the church. During his pastorate the present commodious building was erected and also that of St. Martin's Convent and accompanying schools.
         In 1876 Father Lynch was succeeded by the Rev, John Hennessy, who administered the affairs of St. Martin's until 1880. Then Father James P. Barren occupied the pastorate until June of the following year, when our subject assumed control. He has the spiritual welfare of one hundred and forty families to look after. Since coming to Cascade he has made many
valuable improvements in the church property, among which was the large church tower and the priest's residence, which was built at a cost of $5,000, and a school building at about $1,000. The church proper is a solid stone structure, nicely furnished, and when completed cost $16,000. There is a fine school for boys, the building occupying two lots on Keene Street.
The girls' school is situated in the Convent of St. Martin's and the total scholarship is one hundred and twenty. Six Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary are employed as teachers and instruct the pupils in all branches of education. Rev. Father Roche gives his entire attention to his church work and is highly respected in the community in which he lives.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner-

NEILL

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

     J. J. NEILL. Prominent among the settlers of Clayton County who have witnessed the wonderful development  the country has made during the past decade or so, and who have by honest toil and perseverance succeeded  in acquiring a competency and are now enabled to enjoy their well earned  rest, is the gentleman whose name heads this biographical notice.
Mr. Neill was born September 16, 1840.  His father was Joseph Neill, a native of the Emerald Isle, who emigrated to America and settled in New York State for a time, then came to Clayton County, Iowa, settling in this township. He received some land from the Government and on it built a log cabin; he remained here, improving the land, until his demise, at the age
of sixty-four. He was a stanch Democrat, and an earnest member of the Congregational Church, and was a well known personage in this country. The mother was also a native of Ireland. She died there when our subject was yet an infant. The following children were born to her: Mary J., William and John, who all attained maturity but are now deceased. The subject of this sketch was but six years old when he came to this county. He was reared in this township and attended the little log school-house here. He was married June 19,1866, to Miss Harriet Wakeman, who is a native of Indiana. Her parents came from New York State to Indiana, and from there to this county. She was reared in this township, and after her marriage with our subject they settled at their present location. Out of two hundred and forty acres of land, he has but twelve that are not cultivated. He is a stock raiser as well as a tiller of the soil, and makes a specialty of Poland-China hogs, besides fine blooded horses and cattle. There were five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Neill, as follows: Mabel C., William E., Walter J., Herbert N. and Alice E., William now being deceased. The parents are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he being a Trustee of the same. He has been a member of the School Board for a number of years, and is also a stockholder in the company that operates the Farmers' Creamery, and was for a time its Director and Vice-President.
         Mr. Neill has never asked for any offices of public trust, but is always selected by his friends and neighbors because of his ability. He has a most excellent wife and she has impressed her intelligence upon her children to a marked degree. Literally a self-made man, he may with satisfaction review his life of energetic industry, animated by a courage and determination which have enabled him to overcome obstacles and win financial success and an abundant competence.  An upright man and liberal spirited citizen, he is universally respected, and enjoys the high regard of many friends. Politically a Democrat, Mr. Neill is interested in both local and national issues, and intelligently posted in all matters tending
to the promotion of the general welfare, and does his full duty as a true and patriotic American citizen.

-Contributed by Becky Teubner-

McCONNON

Portrait and Biographical Record of Dubuque, Jones and Clayton Counties
Chicago: Chapman Pub. Co., 1894

   JOHN McCONNON, a highly respected resident of Monticello, is engaged in the flour and feed business, having a well stocked establishment, and follows a line of trade in which he is making a success.    He was born in Boston, Mass., April 26, 1826, and is the son of Hugh and Ann (O'Donnell) McConnon, both of whom were natives of Ireland, and came to the United States in 1819, locating in Boston.  The father worked as a slater while living in
the Hub City, but after moving to New Hampshire carried on farm pursuits and there passed his last days.
     Mrs. Ann McConnon came to Iowa in company with our subject in 1854, with whom she made her home until her decease in Monticello, in 1885, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. Hugh McConnon was only forty-five at the time of his death. The parents reared a family of four children, May; John, of this sketch; Sarah, the wife of John Matthews of this city, and Ellen, the wife of W. H. Proctor, a merchant in Monticello. The subject of this sketch was given a good education in Claremont, N. H., after which he passed his years on his father's farm, until coming to Iowa in 1854. He at once made his home in this city, and for eighteen years was teamster for his brother-in-law, W. H. Proctor. He then opened a flour and
feed store, and since 1879 has been engaged in this line of business and thus commands a good trade.
     John McConnon was married in 1855 to Miss Sally A., daughter of Alex and Betsey Graham. Their union has resulted in the birth of three sons and two daughters, namely: William, an electrician, who makes his home in Albany, N. Y.;  John, who is also an electrician, and is engaged in business in New Orleans; Frank, who is a student in Ames, Iowa; Anna G., the wife of T. F. Bevington of Sioux City, this state, who died in 1888 when twenty-four years of age, and Nellie, who afterward married her brother-in-law, T. F.
Bevington.
         In politics Mr. McConnon is strongly in sympathy with the Prohibition party and always votes that ticket, believing that the day will soon come when they will elect a President.  In religious affairs he is a devout member of the Catholic Church.





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