THE IRISH IN IOWA

Biographies of Those Who Came From Ireland

HIGGINS

History of Crawford County, Iowa...by F. W. Meyers. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J.
Clarke Pub. Co., 1911.

      A productive farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Willow township yields gratifying returns for the labor of John W. Higgins. He was born on the place where he now lives, January 5, 1884, a son of John and Mary (Gaynor) Higgins. The father was born in Ireland and came to the United States at the age of eighteen. He spent nine years in Chicago and then, having decided to devote his attention to agricultural pursuits, located in Crawford county, Iowa, upon a tract of eighty acres on section 26, Willow township. He improved his farm and then disposed of it, purchasing one hundred and sixty acres on section 18, where he lived for twenty-eight years. He cultivated the soil, planted trees and made the farm one of the most attractive properties in the locality. In 1908 he removed to Ute, Iowa, where he now lives retired. The mother of our subject was also born in Ireland and was married to Mr. Higgins at Chicago. She now enjoys with him the fruits of many years of labor. There were seven children in the family, six of whom are now living, namely: Mary, who is at home; Margaret, the wife of Dan Hartigan, who lives near Ute; Johannah, who married Patrick Devin and is now living on part of the home farm; Anna and Lizzie, both of whom are at home; and John W., of this review.
     Educated in the district schools of Willow township John W. Higgins early displayed a power of application to his studies which gave good evidence of his mental ability and his desire to make the most of opportunities in life. He continued at home until twenty years of age and then went to Chicago, where he became connected with the wholesale department of Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company. However, he yielded to an irresistible desire to return to agricultural pursuits and accordingly came to Crawford county and began farming on his own account on sections 27 and 28, willow township. After two years he went to Stanley county, South Dakota and settled upon a homestead but did not prove up on it, lacking from October until the following March. Returning to Crawford county, where conditions are much more favorable than he found them in South Dakota, he farmed the Shipley place for one year and then removed to his father's farm, where he has since resided. He is now the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of good land, which he has cultivated with marked success.
     On the 12th of February, 1907, Mr. Higgins was united in marriage to Miss Pearl Ball, a native of Monona county, Iowa, and they have two children, Daniel and Laverne. Although Mr. Higgins is only twenty-seven years of age he has made an excellent start in business and ranks as one of the enterprising and progressive farmers of his township. His success is mainly due to his interest in his work and an honorable ambition to accomplish what he undertakes regardless of the time or labor involved. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party, in whose principles he is a firm believer. He is a strong advocate of education and has served as a member of the school board. Fraternally he is identified with the camp of Modern Woodmen of America at Ute, and he and his estimable wife are members of the Catholic church in whose faith they were reared.

RYAN

History of Delaware County, Iowa...Captain John F. Merry, supervising ed. 2
vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914

William James Ryan was for a number of years a farmer in Delaware
township but for four years preceding his death was engaged in the lumber
business in Fayette, Iowa. He was born in Delaware county, near Manchester,
on a farm in Delaware township, October 8, 1864, a son of William and
Phoebe (Smith) Ryan, natives of New York and Ireland respectively. They
were married in Illinois and after living there for a time came in 1856 to
this county, where they have since made their home. The father during his
active years was a farmer and stock raiser. To their union were born five
children, namely: Huldah, now Mrs. E. R. Leamon, of Manchester; Charles,
who died at the age of two; Ernest; William James; and Harry L.
         William J. Ryan attended the country schools in the neighborhood
of the home farm and also the common schools of Fayette. When he had
attained his majority he started out for himself and became a farmer,
having from boyhood been familiar with practical methods of agriculture,
and as he was a tireless worker and also a man of sound judgment he
prospered, his resources increasing from year to year. His farm of one
hundred and twenty acres, which was situated on section 12, Delaware
township, two and one-half miles southwest of Oneida, was one of the well
improved properties of his locality. In 1908, on account of failing health
he left the farm and moved to Fayette, entering the lumber business, in
which he was engaged for four years. On the 20th of February, 1913, his
determined fight for life was ended and he passed to his reward. He was
laid to rest in the cemetery at Manchester.
         Mr. Ryan was united in marriage on the 25th of February, 1890, to
Miss Cora May Hatch, a daughter of Phineas and Eliza (Rowe) Hatch, natives
of New York state and Illinois respectively. Her parents came to this
county about forty-four years ago and located on a farm in Delaware
township, where they resided for many years. The father passed away in
December, 1907, but the mother still resides upon the home farm, which is
situated two miles west of Oneida. To their union were born three children:
Cora May, Adrian John and Royal. Mr. and Mrs. Ryan became the parents of a
son, Harry Julius, whose birth occurred November 15, 1891. After attending
the rural schools he completed his education at Manchester and Fayette and
is now in the implement business at Greeley, in which connection he is
proving successful.
         Mr. Ryan of this review was a republican in his political belief
and served as school director for a number of years besides taking a keen
interest in all public affairs. His farm is still in possession of his
family and is kept in excellent condition. He was a lover of all kinds of
domestic animals and found great pleasure in raising graded stock for his
own use. His many friends remember with mingled sorrow and gladness his
life, grieving that he is gone but gratefully recalling the many years that
they were privileged to know him intimately. He was a man of innate
kindness of heart and in an unostentatious way went to the assistance of
many who were in need of help. His word was never questioned and his name
stood invariably for honor and strict integrity.

[From the 1880 census records I found that Wm. Sr.'s parents were born
in  NY and Canada. Whether they were of Irish descent before that I don't
know.  Phoebe was born about 1835.  Appears to have immigrated to IL as
that is where she married Wm. Ryan, Sr.]--Becky Teubner

  

WASHBURN

History of Delaware County, Iowa...Captain John F. Merry, supervising ed. 2
vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914

John J. Washburn is busily engaged in the conduct of a dairy as
well as in the production of corn, wheat and other crops which he raises
upon his farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Elk township. Iowa is his
native state and he has ever displayed much of the spirit of enterprise and
progress which has been the dominant factor in the upbuilding of the middle
west. He was born in Clayton county, Iowa, April 17, 1860, a son of Frank
and Martha (Holmes) Washburn, the former a native of Indiana, while the
latter was born in Illinois. It was in the '50s that Frank Washburn brought
his family to this state and here he carried on farming until the time of
the Civil war, when he joined the army and died during the period of
hostilities. His widow survives and in their family were two children, of
whom John J. is now the only survivor.
         A detailed account of the youthful days of John J. Washburn would
present a clear picture of conditions which existed in this county during
the middle of the nineteenth century. He attended school near his home and
alternated study with work in the fields. The experience which he gained
was of a practical nature and he early learned the lesson that industry and
determination are salient factors in success. As a companion and helpmate
for life's journey he chose Miss Joanna Collins, to whom he was united in
marriage on the 8th of January, 1882. She was born May 12, 1858, in
Illinois, a daughter of Michael and Ann (Hennessey) Collins, both of whom
were natives of Ireland, where they lived until 1850 and then severed the
ties which bound them to the old world and came to America. They first
settled in the state of New York but some years afterward made their way
westward to Illinois. In 1860 they came to Iowa, settling at Dyersville,
where they lived a short time, and then settled in Delaware county and
purchased the farm upon which Mr. and Mrs. Washburn now reside, comprising
one hundred and twenty acres on section 17, Elk township. This property has
now come into possession of our subject and his wife. Both the father and
mother continued to live there until their life's labors were ended.
         Mr. and Mrs. Washburn have a daughter, Mary Helen, who was born
February 21, 1900. Their home is not far distant from Greeley and in the
community they are widely and favorably known. Mr. Washburn gives almost
his entire attention to his farming interests, and his dairy, with its
excellent products, constitutes one of his chief sources of revenue.  When
the time comes to express is political belief and opinions he votes with
the democratic party, but he has never sought or held public office.  For
eight years he served as school director and during that time gave helpful
aid to improving the condition of the schools through employing good
teachers and adhering to high standards of instruction.

Submitted by--Becky Teubner

WORLEY

History of Delaware County, Iowa...Captain John F. Merry, supervising ed. 2
vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914

         Charles E. Worley is a dealer in harness, coal, automobiles and
supplies at Ryan, where he is conducting a profitable and growing business.
He was born in Hazel Green, Iowa, on the 21st of August, 1864, a son of
Joseph and Electa (Malory) Worley, the former a native of Kentucky and the
latter of Indiana. In the year 1843 the mother came from the Hoosier state
to Iowa, settling on a farm in Delaware county. In 1847 Joseph Worley
arrived and they were married in this county. Nine children were born unto
them. Mary became the wife of George Belknap, a farmer of Prairie township,
and died in 1910. Martha became the wife of Willis Collins and for several
years lived in Hazel Green township but afterward removed to a farm near
Des Moines, where Mr. Collins passed away in 1901. His widow is now living
north of Des Moines. Hester became the wife of Sylvester Green and both
have passed away. Eliza is the wife of Samuel Morgan and is a resident of
Manchester. Frank is living at Baldwin Park, California. Margaret became
the wife of Charles Palmer, of Sac county, Iowa, and, removing to Texas,
both passed away in that state. Susie is the wife of Oss Earley and they
are now residents of San Jose, California. Charlotte is the wife of Robert
Snodgrass, who is living in Sheridan county, Nebraska.
         The other member of the family is Charles E. Worley, who acquired
his education in the schools of Union township and of Hazel Green township
and also spent one year as a student in the Northern Indiana Normal School
at Valparaiso.  On the 28th of December, 1893, he was united in marriage to
Miss Mary Connor, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Cavanaugh) Connor. Her
father, a native of Pennsylvania, arrived in Delaware county, Iowa, in
1854, and the mother, a native of Ireland, left that country with her
parents and settled at Delhi, Iowa, in 1854. Throughout the years of his
active life Mr. Connor followed the occupation of farming but in his later
years lived retired, passing away September 26, 1914. His widow now lives
with her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Worley, unto whom have been
born three children: Eva, Marie and Ruby, all yet at home.
         Charles E. Worley was twenty years of age when he left Iowa and
went to Nebraska, where he remained until 1893, during which time he was
engaged in ranching and breaking horses. He also worked for two years in
the harness business but in 1893 returned to Iowa and for a year thereafter
engaged in farming. He then embarked in the harness business in Ryan, where
he is now engaged in handling not only harness but also coal, automobiles
and supplies. He has a well appointed store and he has sold more buggies
than almost any man in the county in the same length of time. In addition
to his business here he owns six hundred acres of land on the Grand Prairie
of Arkansas, his old homestead of four hundred acres in Nebraska and three
hundred acres in South Dakota and from his property interests derives a
substantial annual income.
         Mr. Worley is a man of sound business judgment who readily
recognizes and utilizes opportunities and makes wise use of his time and
talents. When obstacles and difficulties arise, they do not seem to deter
him but rather act as an impetus for renewed effort and thus he has
gradually advanced, making a creditable record in business circles, his
methods being thoroughly reliable as well as enterprising. He holds
membership with the Modern Woodmen of America and has been prominent in
public affairs of his community, serving for four years as mayor of Ryan,
during which period he gave to the town a public-spirited and businesslike
administration of benefit along various lines.

[Charles was not Irish but his mother-in-law was!]-- Becky Teubner

HARPER

Biographical Souvenir of the Counties of Delaware and Buchanan... F. A. Battey & Co., 1890.

JAMES HARPER belongs to the list of successful men of Delaware county. He
is familiar with pioneer life in Iowa, and knows  what hard times meant in
the "fifties."    He has by his industry and hard work transformed three
hundred   and forty acres of raw prairie land into one of the finest and
most productive farms in the country.
Mr. Harper is a native of Huntington county, Pa., and was born near a
famous old English fort December 15, 1812. His father, Robert Harper, was a
native of Ireland. He came to America in 1790, when quite young, and
settled in the Keystone State, where he died in 1845. He followed
agricultural pursuits throughout life. He lived a consistent Christian life
and was a zealous member of the Presbyterian church. The mother of our
subject bore the maiden name of Rosana Moreland. She was a native of
Ireland, but came to the New World with her parents when a child. She died
in 1847. She was a bright example of a Christian lady, kind, generous and
hospitable, always ready to help the poor, the unfortunate and the
distressed, relieving their wants and speaking kind words of comfort and
hope. She had hosts of friends and not an enemy in the world. A faithful
wife and devoted mother, her death was mourned not only by her relatives,
but also by a large circle of friends, to whom she was greatly endeared.
She was the mother of six children, three of whom still survive her.
James Harper was reared on a farm and his limited education was obtained in
the old-fashioned log school-house with puncheon floor, slab seats and
large fireplace, with chimney made of sticks and clay.
He remained at home until he became of age, and then went to Wisconsin,
where he spent thirteen years in the lumber camps of that state. He owned
one sawmill, and did an extensive business.
In 1850 he returned to his native state, where he was engaged in farming
for four years.
In 1854 he removed to Delaware county, Iowa, settled in South Fork
township, where he purchased land and where he has since lived. Settlers
were few and far between in those days and wild game was plentiful.
Mr. Harper married in Pennsylvania in 1852, taking for a life companion
Miss Matilda Jefferies, a native of that state. She is a daughter of David
and Elizabeth Wilson Jefferies, both of whom were natives of the Keystone
State and descendants of William Penn's colony. The father was a farmer and
a man of considerable prominence, having been justice of the peace for many
years. He was a zealous member of the Presbyterian church and respected by
all who knew him.
The union of Mr. and Mrs. Harper was blessed by the birth of  two children,
Elizabeth (now deceased) and Matilda.
Mr. Harper lost his first wife in 1857, and six years later he married
Julia Larabee, a native of Maine. The result of this union was six
children, five of whom are now living, viz.Ada J., Lavinia, William, James
and George.
Mr. Harper was reared a democrat and affiliated with that party for twenty
years, but has since been a stanch republican. While he has never sought
office, he has been called upon to fill some important positions of public
trust.    He was a member of the board of county supervisors one term and
has filled other minor offices.
He has lived a Christian life for many years and is a regular attendant at
the Presbyterian church, of which he has been a member for a few years.
He owns a fine estate of three hundred and twenty acres of
highly-cultivated land, equipped with all modern improvements. He is one of
the leading farmers of South Fork township, and is deservedly popular in
the community.

Submitted by--Becky Teubner

HENDERSON

History of Delaware County, Iowa...Captain John F. Merry, supervising ed. 2
vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914

Charles W. Henderson, a representative and enterprising agriculturist of
Delaware county, operates a well improved farm of two hundred acres on
sections 35 and 36, Adams township. His birth occurred in Jackson township,
Linn county, Iowa, in 1876, his parents being Henry and Hannah (Blodgette)
Henderson. The father, a native of Canada, was born twenty-five miles north
of Quebec, while the mother's birth occurred in Jackson township, Linn
county, this state. Their marriage was celebrated in Linn county in
February, 1876, and there they still reside. Throughout his entire business
career Henry Henderson has devoted his attention to general agricultural
pursuits. To him and his wife have been born two children, namely: Charles
W., of this review; and Lester, who is married and lives in Waterloo, Iowa.
Charles W. Henderson .supplemented his early educational training by a high
school course at Coggon. Since putting aside his text-books he has given
his time and energies to agricultural pursuits and now operates a valuable
farm belonging to his wife's father, which comprises two hundred acres
south of Ryan, on sections 35 and 36, Adams township. He cultivates the
cereals best adapted to soil and climate and also devotes considerable
attention to stock-raising, this branch of his business adding materially
to his annual income.
On the 21st of June, 1899, Mr. Henderson was united in marriage to Miss
Louise Patton, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. James Patton of Coggon, the
former a native of Ireland. Our subject and his wife have two children,
Bertha and James Wilbur Henderson. Fraternally Mr. Henderson is identified
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Coggon and Manchester and also
with the Modern Woodmen of America. His life has been such as to merit the
respect, of his fellowmen, and by his honesty, uprightness and industry he
has contributed much toward the upbuilding of the community of which he is
a representative citizen.

[The subject is not Irish but his wife had an Irish father, James Patton.  I
have more on the entire Patton family in my database if anyone is
interested.  Bertha Louise's mother was Mary P. Minor of Illinois. ]--
Becky Teubner

PALMER

From Iowa Official Register 1909-1910

 Railroad Commissioner, was born in Washington, county, Pennsylvania, November 15, 1839. His father, Samuel  R. Palmer, was born in Ireland, and his mother, Margaret Munce Palmer, in the United States. In 1856 he came to Iowa with his parents, where they settled on a farm in Washington county. Colonel Palmer still makes this farm his home place. he attended the common schools and in 1859 and 1860 attended the United Presbyterian College in Washington, Iowa, quitting to teach school, hoping to make enough money in this way to complete his education. In the spring and summer of 1861, however, when his duties as school-teacher had ended, men were enlisting for the war, and on July 10, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company "C", Eighth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and was promoted to corporal September 9, 1861.
     At the battle of Shiloh, on April 6, 1862, he was severely wounded in the left breast and as soon as possible was sent to his home. When the Twenty-fifth Iowa Volunteer Infantry was organized, and mustered in at Mount Pleasant, September 27, 1862, Corporal Palmer, who had organized a company at his home town while his left arm was still in a sling, was elected captain of Company "A". He was promoted to lieutenant-colonel of the regiment June 9, 1863. He was with Grant at the siege of Vicksburg and in the Chattanooga campaign; through the Atlanta campaign and marched with Sherman to the sea and up through the Carolinas, resulting in the capture of Columbia; was in the grand review in the city of Washington, May 24, 1865; mustered out June 6, 1865, and honorably discharged from the service.
     Colonel Palmer returned to his home in Washington at the close of the war and in 1866 married Letitia H. Young. Colonel Palmer has always followed farming as his vocation and has always been a Republican in politics. He was auditor of Washington county from 1876 to 1880, was in the State Senate in the Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth, Twenty-sixth, and Twenty-seventh General Assemblies, resigning at the close of the Twenty-seventh Assembly to accept the position of Railroad Commissioner, to which place he was appointed by Governor Shaw upon the death of Major C.L. Davidson. The following November he was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Major Davison, and has since that time been a member of the Board.

DUGAN

History of Crawford County, Iowa...by F. W. Meyers. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J.
Clarke Pub. Co., 1911.

     Among the citizens of Crawford county who have been successful in agriculture and stock-raising and are now enjoying the fruits of many years of labor is C.M. Dugan, of West Side township. He is a native of Michigan, born April 1, 1859, a son of Martin and Mary (Ryan) Dugan, both of whom were born in Ireland. They emigrated to America and lived for a number of years in Michigan. The family came to Linn county, Iowa, about 1859, and in 1871 arrived in Crawford county. The father devoted his attention to farming, in which he continued until his death, May 25, 1899. The mother passed away five years later, on March 18, 1904. There were eight children in their family, seven of whom are now living.
     C.M. Dugan attended the public schools in his boyhood and remained with his parents until thirty years of age assisting in the work of the home farm. He then removed to a farm on section 7, West Side township, which he cultivated to good advantage for ten years, and at the end of that time he took up his residence in Vail, where he continued for five years. In 1906 he removed to a place of one hundred and forty-five acres on section 30,  West Side township, which he now owns. The air of neatness and order that prevails throughout his farm indicates the thoughtful attention which he bestows upon his work and is also proof of generous financial returns. In addition to his agricultural interests he is vice president of the Farmers State Bank at Vail. He is a man of Marked influence in the community whose opinion commands respect wherever he is known.
     In 1892 Mr. Dugan was united in marriage to Miss Anna Kelly, who was born at Peoria, Illinois, November 25, 1871, a daughter of M. and Mary (Conway) Kelly. The father was born in Ireland and the mother in Massachusetts. Mrs. Kelly died August 1, 1882, in Illinois, and subsequently Mr. Kelly came to Crawford county, Iowa, where he is now living. There were seven children in his family, five of whom survive. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dugan, Mabel, Martin, Nellie, Edward, Carl M., and Lucile. The three older children are in attendance at the high school at Vail.
     Mr. Dugan has always been a man of sound common sense. He is honorable and upright in his dealings and generous in his estimate of others, standing among the representative and progressive citizens of the county. In the development of this section he has borne his share and it may be said to his credit that he has never sought to advance his interests in the injury of others. Politically he gives his support for the democratic party. He has served as a member of the board of county supervisors and as a township trustee and school director. In religious belief he and his wife are sincere adherents of the Catholic church.

WALSH

History of Crawford County, Iowa...by F. W. Meyers. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J.
Clarke Pub. Co., 1911.

     A highly improved farm of one hundred and eighty acres in West Side township is evidence of the energy and ability of John T. Walsh, who is recognized as one of the progressive men of his section. His success has been due to a laudable ambition and an unalterable perseverance which are important elements of his character. He is a native of Livingston county, Illinois, born June 10, 1869, and is a son of James E. and Honora (Breen) Walsh, both of whom were born in Ireland. The father came to America in 1850 and was married in Illinois to Miss Honora Breen. Later he came with his family to Crawford county, Iowa, and he and his wife are now living at Vail, the former having reached the age of seventy-six, while the latter is seventy-seven years of age. They are the parents of four children.
     John T. Walsh received his early education in the common schools and later had the advantage of attending the high school. He continued at home until arriving at maturity and then, having decided to devote his attention to agricultural pursuits, he began farming upon his own account. He has applied himself to such excellent advantage that he now owns one hundred and eighty acres of land on sections 29 and 32, West Side township, all of which is under admirable cultivation and capable of producing large crops. Everything about the place is in good order and denotes that he has prospered in his calling and is in comfortable circumstances. He raises various grains, but make a specialty of raising and feeding stock for the market.
     On May 21, 1907, Mr. Walsh was united in marriage to Miss Alice Coughlin, who was born in Canada, a daughter of Patrick and Mary (Quinn) Coughlin. The father was born in Ireland and the mother in Canada. She is now deceased, but Mr. Coughlin is living at Dunlap, Iowa. There were eleven children in their family, eight of whom survive. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Walsh: Maurice Francis Carroll, who was born October 19, 1909; and James P., who was born April 17, 1910,and died July 6 following.
     Mr. Walsh may be designated as a self-made man, as he has attained a gratifying degree of financial prosperity entirely through his own efforts. He is recognized as the possessor of clear judgment and sound business ability, and as he is genial and public-spirited, he enjoys the unqualified respect and esteem of those who know him. Politically, he is not identified with any of the great organizations, but votes independently, preferring to be controlled by the conditions that prevail at the time of the election. Fraternally he is a valued member of Lodge No. 780, K.C., of Carroll, and has taken a great interest in the order, having filled all the chairs in the lodge. In religious belief he and his wife are Catholics.

IRWIN

Biographical History of Pottawattamie County: Lewis Pub. Co., 1891.

     F.T. Irwin, editor of the Neola Reporter, was born in Steubenville, Ohio, June 24, 1853, the son of James and Margaret (Lucas) Irwin, natives of Ireland. James Irwin was born December 12, 1838, came to America when a boy, and at the age of thirteen years began to learn the printing business, in Harrison County, Ohio. After he had served his apprenticeship he lived in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and other places, and finally located in Steubenville, where he was married. He was in business there two years then sold out, and for a number of years was foreman on the Steubenville Herald. Since 1864 he has resided at Des Moines, Iowa. His wife was born in January, 1839, and died in November, 1882, leaving three children, namely: H.T. and Elizabeth, now the wife of William B. Graham, in Kansas City, Missouri; and Annie E., who was born October 17, 1857, and now resides in Des Moines.
     Mr. Irwin, the subject of this brief notice, began his apprenticeship in the art of printing at the age of fifteen, in Des Moines. In the spring of 1878 he was married in Panora, Iowa, where he remained until 1882, when he returned to Des Moines. In the fall of 1883 he came to Neola and purchased the office of the Neola Reporter, of which he is now the popular editor. It is a journal sparkling with news and wit. Mr. Irwin is a Republican on national issues and independent in local elections. He has been Town Recorder for the past three years; is a member of the Crystal Lodge, No. 238, K. of P., of Neola of which society he is treasurer. He is a live, energetic young man.
     January 19, 1878, at Panora, he married Anna Bowen, the daughter of William and Sarah (White) Bowen, both natives of Ohio, the former now residing in Nebraska, the latter having died July 5, 1890. She was born September 17, 1857, the fourth in a family of seven children, and a farmer's daughter. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of Neola.

DOHANY

Biographical History of Pottawattamie County: Lewis Pub. Co., 1891.

     John Dohany was born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, in 1826, the son of John and Margaret (English) Dohany, natives of Ireland, who came to America about 1820, locating first in Pennsylvania and afterward removed to New Jersey, where the father died in 1833; the mother died in Pennsylvania in 1836.
     Our subject came west to Indiana in 1837, where he made his home until he was seventeen. Then in 1842 he came west to St. Louis. In 1846 he went to Dubuque, Iowa, spending the time until 1851 in Dubuque and Jackson counties. In the spring of 1852 he went to southern and central Missouri. In 1856 he came to Council Bluffs, and he has done as much as any other man in the city toward building it up. He was one of the few who were instrumental in having the terminus of the Union Pacific Railroad in Council Bluffs, and in many ways has done much to his credit that will stand as a monument of his true worth long after he is gone.
     He has always been associated with the Democratic party.
     he was married December 31, 1849, to Clara Noble, of Bellevue, Iowa, born in Illinois in 1828, of Puritan extraction, and died in Council Bluffs in 1885. They had five children: Ada, wife of Martin G. Griffin, of Portland, Oregon; Margaret, wife of W.H. Maurer, of Council Bluffs; Adella, at home; Julia, wife of William A. Keelind, of Council Bluffs; John, a resident of Portland, Oregon. They are members of the Catholic Church.

PENTONY

History of Delaware County, Iowa...Captain John F. Merry, supervising ed. 2
vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914

     John J. Pentony, a deputy sheriff of Delaware county, has demonstrated that he is a man of high standards of public service and of absolute fearlessness in the discharge of his duties. He was born in Woodstock, McHenry county, Illinois, February 22, 1861, a son of William
Pentony, who was born in Ireland in 1822. By trade the father was a carpenter and in 1864 he settled in Delaware county, where he passed away in 1905. His wife, who in her maidenhood was Elizabeth Gannon, was born in the same county in Ireland, although they did not meet until after they had come to this country. Her death occurred on Christmas day, 1894. They had seven children, namely: Mary, the wife of Edward Malone, a resident of Milesville, South Dakota; Henry, who has passed away; J. J., the subject of this review; Julia, who passed away leaving four children; William F., deceased; Anna Lucinda, the wife of Peter J. McEnany, of Adams township, this county; and Mrs. Ella Collis, living at Yuma, Arizona.
         John J. Pentony attended the common schools of the county in the acquirement of his elementary education and subsequently was a student in the Manchester Academy, now defunct, until 1880. He then began reading law in the office of E. M. Carr and so continued for two years, but before he was admitted to the bar he gave up his plan to become a member of the legal profession and entered the railway mail service, with which he was connected until 1890. He was then for two years a traveling salesman and subsequently, during Cleveland's second term, was deputy postmaster of Manchester under P. J. Wellman. However, he gave up his position before the expiration of his term in order to open a drug store at Ryan in 1895. After three years he sold the business to his partner, A. S. Gibbons, and devoted his energy to the real-estate business, handling land in northern Wisconsin and Minnesota until 1906. However, he spent the winter of 1903-04 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In September, 1906, he became deputy sheriff of Delaware county and has served continuously in that office. He is his party's nominee, in 1914, for sheriff. He has displayed the admirable characteristics of energy, decision and sound judgment in everything that he has done and holds the respect and confidence of his fellowmen.
         Mr. Pentony was married on the 10th of February, 1886, to Miss Clara Eleanor Magill, who was born in Clinton, Illinois, on the 7th of December, 1866, a daughter of William and Mary (Simms) Magill. Her father, who was a banker and merchant, has passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Pentony have been born six children: Madge A., the wife of Charles G. Newcomb, a
resident of New Mexico; Mary C., the wife of Earl A. Davis, of Glenwood county, this state; Clara M., the wife of Roy Stewart, who resides in Manchester; and Joseph, Beatrice and Isabel, all at home. Mr. Pentony is a democrat in politics and is ever loyal in his support of the men and measures of that party.

Submitted by--Becky Teubner

BRISTOL

History of Delaware County, Iowa...Captain John F. Merry, supervising ed. 2
vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914

W. H. P. BRISTOL.
The merchants of Colesburg have done much for the development of the town
and W. H. P. Bristol has been among the first to introduce new methods in
retail selling and has always kept his stock up-to-date and of pleasing
variety. He was born in Orange county, New York, August 25, 1838, a son of
John D. and Mary (Decker) Bristol, also natives of the Empire state. In
1855 the family migrated west and located in Clayton county, Iowa, where
the parents resided until called to their reward. The father was a
carpenter by trade but previous to coming to this state was for some time a
railroad man.
W. H. P. Bristol was one of a family of six children, five of whom survive,
and he remained at home until he attained his majority. He began clerking
in Colesburg, being so engaged for ten years, after which he started a
store of his own, which he has since conducted. In 1909 he entered into
partnership with J. C. Bolsinger and the firm name is now Bristol &
Bolsinger. Their patronage is drawn from the country around Colesburg as
well as from the town itself and the volume of business conducted annually
is steadily increasing, as the excellence of their goods and the courtesy
with which all customers are treated cause those who have bought of them
once to return again and these same qualities attract new customers.
In 1891 Mr. Bristol was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Moreland, who
was in this county, a daughter of B. F. and Catherine (Glynn) Moreland. Her
father was a native of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, and her mother of Ireland.
They had ten children, eight of whom survive. The family home was
established in Clayton county, Iowa, in the early '40s, when the state was
still largely an undeveloped territory, and later a removal was made to
Delaware county. Mr. Moreland engaged in mercantile business in Colesburg
for a number of years and was highly respected in the community. He and his
wife both passed away in this county.
Mr. and Mrs. Bristol are members of the Congregational church and its
teachings guide and mold their lives. He is a republican in his political
views and stanchly upholds the principles of that party. Fraternally he
belongs to Colony Lodge, No. 50, I. O. O. P., at Colesburg, and is a past
grand, having filled all the chairs.  In addition to his store he owns
three lots and buildings in Colesburg.  He is one of the prosperous
citizens of the community and in winning material success has conformed his
life so closely to the highest standards both of personal and business
ethics that he has the full confidence and the highest respect of those who
know him.

Submitted by--Becky Teubner

FUNK

History of Delaware County, Iowa...Captain John F. Merry, supervising ed. 2
vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914

JOSEPH P. FUNK.
Joseph P. Funk is the owner of a good farm of one hundred and thirty-three
acres on sections 10, 11, 14 and 15, Honey Creek township, a portion of
which was unimproved land at the time it came into his possession. One of
the county's native sons, his birth occurred February 2, 1881, in the
township which is still his home, his parents being John and Bridget
(Conley) Funk. The father was a native of Austria and in his boyhood days
crossed the Atlantic to the new world, taking up his abode in Delaware
county, where he remained until his death. In this state he wedded Bridget
Conley, who was born in Pennsylvania and came to Iowa with her parents
during her girlhood, since which time she has remained in this state. Mr.
and Mrs. Funk became the parents of nine children, all of whom are yet
living, but the family circle was broken by the hand of death when, in
1904, the father was called to the home beyond. He had prospered in his
business affairs as the years had passed on and had become a large landowner.
Joseph P. Funk had the usual experiences of the farm boy who works in the
fields through the summer months and attends school in the winter seasons.
He remained at home until he attained his majority and then purchased the
farm upon which he now resides, comprising one hundred and thirty-three
acres of land on sections 10, 11, 14 and 15, Honey Creek township. Since
that time he has labored persistently and energetically to make his farm
one of the best properties of the district and his efforts are practical
and resultant. He makes dairying a feature of his business and is also
engaged in raising stock, for which he finds a ready sale and secures a
good price.
In 1910 Mr. Funk was united in marriage to Miss Mary McTaggart, who was
born in Clayton county, Iowa, a daughter of Michael and Nellie (Carr)
McTaggart, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of this country.
They are now residents of Clayton county, this state. Mr. and Mrs. Funk are
the parents of one son, Paul J., who was born October 26, 1913.
Mr. and Mrs. Funk hold membership in the Catholic church and he belongs to
the Modern Woodmen Camp No. 225. Mrs. Funk was a school teacher prior to
her marriage, successfully following that profession for several years.
Politically Mr. Funk is a democrat. Both have spent their entire lives in
this part of the state and have a wide and favorable acquaintance.

Submitted by--Becky Teubner

HETHERINGTON

Biographical Souvenir of the Counties of Delaware and Buchanan... F. A. Battey & Co., 1890.

     THOMAS HETHERINGTON was born in Lycoming county, Pa., June 6,
1817. He is a son of David and Elizabeth (Huff) Hetherington, the former of
whom was a native of Ireland, and the latter a native of New Jersey. The
father came to the United States when a young man, and settled in
Northumberland county, Pa., afterwards moving to Lycoming county, that
state, where he married, and thence moved to Richland county, Ohio, in
1838, and there died in 1853, at the age of eighty-four. He was a farmer
throughout life, an enterprising, industrious and successful one. The
mother died while the family was residing in Lycoming county, Pa., in the
year 1835, at the age of sixty.
         To David and Elizabeth Hetherington were born eleven children, of
whom the subject of this notice is the sixth. Only two besides our subject
are now living- Ruth Ann, wife of Alexander McElvane, and Asher, both
residing near Mansfield Ohio. The deceased brothers and sisters are-John,
Mary, Ellen, William, Eliza, Nancy, James and David.
         Thomas, the subject proper of this notice, was reared in his
native county, in Pennsylvania, and  had attained his majority when his
father moved to Richland county, Ohio.    He accompanied his father to
Ohio, and settling in Richland county resided there till 1844, when he went
to Rock county, Wis.  He married in Rock county, and  lived  there till
June, 1853, then came to Iowa and settled in Delaware county.    On
locating in this county he bought a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of
land in Delaware township, for  which he paid $6.50 per acre, and a
tract  of forty  acres   in  Coffin's Grove township, for which he paid
$75.00.   He settled on the former tract, and engaged at once in farming,
and has been so engaged since.    In fact, Mr. Hetherington has been a
farmer all his life, was reared on the farm and has followed the pursuits
for which he was trained in youth with industry and has met with a fair
degree of success.    He resided on his farm in Delaware township till
1880, at  which date   he moved to Manchester, where he has since lived,
still retaining his farming interest, however.   Coming to this county at
the date he did, Mr. Hetherington has seen  most of the   changes
which   have marked the progress of his adopted home, from a wild prairie
to a country of well improved farms, and in the labor of bringing about
this great change he has faithfully borne the part that has fallen to his
lot, in connection with his own locality.
He   has   served   in   the   usual   number of   local   offices,   the   duties   of   which he has discharged with credit to himself and satisfaction to those concerned.   He has taken no
particular interest in  any matter of a political nature, but for the upbuilding of the social, industrial and educational interests of his community he has always been active, and his name has ever stood pledged for the enforcement of the law and the preservation of order and good government in the vicinity where he has resided.
         Mr. Hetherington married January 6, 1846, taking to wife Miss Susanna Crall then of Richland county, Ohio, where also she was born, March 18,1827.  The wife of his youth abides with him, having borne him a faithful and affectionate companionship for more than forty-four years.    Mrs. Hetherington is a daughter of John and Sarah  (Lacer)  Crall, her  father   having been a  native of Dauphin county, Pa., where he lived for many years.   He died in Rock county, Wis., in February, 1876, having attained the seventy-third year of his   age.     He  was   a   farmer   and was always engaged in agricultural pursuits. He was a son of Matthias Crall, who was a Pennsylvanian  by birth and who lived most of his life in his native state, but died in Richland county, Ohio, at the age of   seventy-five.       Mrs.   Hetherington's mother  was  born  in Perry county, Pa., and died   in   Richland   county, Ohio, in 1860, at the age of fifty-four.    She was a daughter of Christian Lacer, a Pennsylvanian, who died in his native state in 1855, aged seventy-one years.
         Mr. and Mrs. Hetherington are the parents of eight children. Maria, their eldest, was born February 20, 1848. She is now the wife of Andrew Hesner, and lives in Weaver, Minn. Russell, their next, was born October 8, 1849. He married Addie Hudson, of this county, and she afterwards dying, he married Nellie O'Donnell, also of this county. He lives in Rawlins county, Kans., and is a miller. John was born April 27,1853. He married Mary J. Thornburg, of this county, and now resides here, the father of two children - Harry Ernest and Florence Belle. Amos B. and Asher F., Mr. and Mrs. Hetherington's next two children, are twins and were born June 1, 1856. The former resides in this county and a sketch of him appears in this work. The latter is in Black Hills, Dak. Matilda was born February 13, 1858, and still resides with her parents. Mary Jane was born August 5, 1863, and is also with her parents.
Amanda was born March 3, 1866, and is the wife of Albert Acers, of this county.
         While Mr. Hetherington has never taken much interest in partisan
politics he has not neglected his duties as a citizen and voter. In earlier
years he was a whig and supported the whig ticket with much zeal. On the
disappearance of the old party lines, he cast his political fortunes with
the republican party, and he has maintained a steady allegiance to the
teachings of that party since. He is an intelligent and public-spirited
citizen and in the progressive town of his residence a worthy personage and
important factor.

Submitted by--Becky Teubner

MAHONEY

History of Crawford County, Iowa...by F. W. Meyers. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J.
Clarke Pub. Co., 1911.

     Joseph H. Mahoney, who holds the responsible position of freight inspector of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, with headquarters in the superintendent's office at Boone, Iowa, was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin, May 24, 1866, a son of Timothy and Mary (Hickey) Mahoney. The parents are natives of Ireland, whence they emigrated at an early age and upon arriving in this country located in Wisconsin where they continued to reside until the spring of 1867, when they came to Boone county. Subsequently they removed into Boone city and for the past thirty years have lived in retirement, passing the evening of their lives in peace and contentment and in the enjoyment of the fruits of their early labors. They are both hale and hearty, although the father has passed the eightieth milestone on life's journey, while the mother is but five years his junior. Mr. Mahoney still retains possession of his farm in Boone county.
     To this worthy couple have been born ten children, the following of whom are still living: William, who lives in Casper, Wyoming, and is employed as an engineer on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad; Frank, who is connected with the Union Pacific Railroad and resides in Denver, Colorado; Edward, who makes his home in Boone, Iowa; Joseph H. of this review; Dora, who became the wife of P.M. Reilly and lives in Hastings, Nebraska; Mary, who resides with her parents; Timothy, who is a partner in the law firm of Goodykoontz Mahoney, located in Boone. The members of the family who are deceased are James, George and John.
     The early education of Joseph H. Mahoney was obtained in the district schools and, being a bright scholar as well as an ambitious youth, when but sixteen years old he secured a position as teacher in one of the county schools working on the farm during the summer months. After being three years thus employed he attended the Iowa State College for one year and then secured clerkship in the postoffice at Boone, which position he occupied one year. On November 15, 1887, he entered the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, serving in various minor capacities at the Boone station for seven years and on December 5, 1894, was promoted to the office of station agent at Denison, representing the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, serving in this capacity during the following fifteen years. On December 15, 1909, he was again promoted, this time to the position of freight inspector, with headquarters at Boone, having jurisdiction over all matters pertaining to the handling of freight in the territory from Des Moines to Omaha, including the branches of the Sioux City division of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. He maintains a residence in Denison, where he owns a comfortable home.
     Mr. Mahoney was married June 20, 1898, to Mollie B. Malony, a daughter of Andrew and Bridget (Sherran) Malony, to whom five children were born, those living as follows: Judith, who married C.S. Marshall, of Charter Oak; Mary, who became the wife of Edward Phalen and lives in Omaha, Nebraska; Kate, who is now living in Denison and is the widow of D.O. Johnson, a former resident of Charter Oak; Mollie, the wife of our subject; a and Maggie, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney are the parents of one child, George Andrew, who was born in 1911.
     In his political opinions Mr. Mahoney has always given his support to the republican party. In religion he is a member of the Roman Catholic church and fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias. He is a man of strong character, ever faithful to his duties, which he has always performed with an efficiency that has won for him the commendation of his superiors and socially he possesses the high regard of a wide circle of friends.

THOMPSON

The History of Marshall County, Iowa. Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1878

     Thompson ,William, farmer, Sec. 36; P.O. State Center; born 1807 in Ireland; in 1832 came to Providence , R.I.; in 1857 came to Belvidere, Ill.; in 1867 removed to his present farm; owns 160 acres of land valued at $35 per acre. Married Elizabeth A. Nelson July 4, 1837; she was born in 1817 in Ireland; had 11 children-5 living: Sarah J. Mary E., Ella, William S., Maggie E. Are members of United Presbyterian church.

McCRACKEN

The History of Marshall County, Iowa. Chicago: Western Hist. Co., 1878

     McCracken, William, farmer, Sec. 6; P.O. Bangor; owns 80 acres of land valued at $30 per acre; born in Ireland in 1823; came to America in 1846 and settled in Virginia; removed to this county in 1865. Married Miss Lucy Hawthorne in 1860; she was born in Pennsylvania in 1840; have 4 children- John R., William J., Mary J., Anna B. Members of the M.E. Church; democrat.


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